Search Results

11 - 20 of 29 items :

  • "gastrointestinal stromal tumors" x
Clear All
The role of endoscopic ultrasound and endoscopic resection for gastric glomus: A case series and literature review

gastrointestinal hemorrhage and abdominal pain. [ 6 ] Many glomus tumors of the stomach, however, are misdiagnosed as other mesenchymal tumors, such as gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and leiomyomas. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to accurately preoperative diagnose gastric glomus tumors. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a useful imaging technique for diagnosing the gastric submucosal tumors, [ 7 , 8 , 9 ] but only a few case reports have been published regarding the characteristics of gastric glomus tumors. [ 10 ] Surgical resection is a curable treatment

Open access
Spindle Cell Rhabdomyosarcoma Displaying CD34 Positivity: A Potential Diagnostic Pitfall; Report of Two Pediatric Cases / CD34 Pozitivitesi Gösteren İğsi Hücreli Rabdomyosarkoma: İki Pediatrik Tuzak Olgunun Sunumu

Abstract

Spindle cell rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare subtype of rhabdomyosarcoma mainly seen in children. Occasional aberrant staining with a variety of immunohistochemical markers has been noted. The aberrantly expressed markers include alpha-smooth muscle actin, cytokeratin, S100, neurofilaments, CD20, immunoglobins, and CD117. We report herein two pediatric cases displaying strong CD34 positivity and one with additional focal CD117 positivity, causing considerable difficulty in distinction from solitary fibrous tumor and extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumor. To our knowledge, CD34 staining has been merely reported in rhabdomyosarcoma. Spindle cell rhabdomyosarcoma has to be considered in the differential diagnosis of childhood spindle cell tumors. Post-chemotherapy specimens should be evaluated in caution, since chemotherapy can cause considerable changes in tumor antigen expression. Since CD117 and CD34 are stem cell markers, their positivity in pediatric tumors should be interpreted with caution. Even if the morphology is not supportive, a wide immunohistochemical panel should be applied in childhood malignant solid tumors

Open access
Systemic Treatment for Soft Tissue Sarcoma: What is Standard, What is New

Abstract

Soft tissue sarcoma (STS) is a biologically heterogeneous malignancy with over 50 subtypes. This solid tumor is one of the most challenging diseases to treat for the medical oncologist. STS often forms in the body’s muscles, joints, fat, nerves, deep skin tissues, and blood vessels. The natural history of high-grade STS is characterized by a strong tendency toward local recurrence and metastatic spreading, despite optimal initial strategies. The lung is the most common site of metastases, with poor prognosis. We present the current international guidelines for the adjuvant treatment and systemic treatment for advanced STS and the new discoveries. Many new molecular targeting drugs have been tried in the last ten years, and some were approved for soft tissue sarcoma. The first approved was Imatinib, as a treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Following Imatinib, other tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) received the approval for GISTs such as Sunitinib and Regorafenib, and Pazopanib for non-GIST soft tissue sarcomas. In 2016, FDA approved the first monoclonal antibody that targets platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)-α, Olaratumab. The new treatment demonstrates an overall survival advantage. In this review, we aimed to summarize the results from the most recent studies on adjuvant treatment for high-grade STS and systemic strategies for advanced STS.

Open access
Myxoid liposarcoma with gastric localisation – Case Report

7. Weiss, S.W. & Goldblum, J.R. (2008). Soft tissue tumors (5th edition) (pp. 312-1080). Mosby Elsevier 8. Miettinen, M. & Lasota, J. (2006). Gastrointestinal stromal tumors: review on morphology, molecular pathology, prognosis and differential diagnosis. Arch Pathol Lab Med . 130(10), 1466-1478. PMID:17090188 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] 9. Bosman, F.T., Carneiro, F, Hruban, R.H. & Theise, N.D. (2010). WHO Classification of Tumours of the Digestive System (4th edition). World Health Organization

Open access
Desmoid-type Fibromatosis of the Mesentery: A Case Report

mimicking a gastrointestinal stromal tumour. Radiol Oncol. 2011;45(1):59-63. 4. Rodriguez JA, Guarda LA, Rosai J. Mesenteric fibromatosis with involvement of the gastrointestinal tract. A GIST simulator: a study of 25 cases. Am J Clin Pathol. 2004;121(1):93-8. 5. Gurbuz AK, Giardiello FM, Petersen GM, Krush AJ, Offerhaus GJ, Booker SV, et al. Desmoid tumours in familial adenomatous polyposis. Gut. 1994;35(3):377-81. 6. Spiridakis K, Panagiotakis G, Grigoraki M, Kokkinos I, Papadakis T, Kokkinakis T, et al. Isolated giant mesenteric fibromatosis (intra

Open access
Ureteral metastasis as the first and sole manifestation of gastric cancer dissemination

presentations. J Urol 1974; 112: 188-9. Yeh HC, Hsiao HL, Chang TH, Wang SL, Huang CH, Wu WJ. Postoperative disseminated intravascular coagulation in a patient with ureteral metastasis from gastric cancer. Kaohsiung J Med Sci 2008; 24: 319-23. Oblak I, Anderluh F, Velenik V. Postoperative radiochemotherapy for gastric adenocarcinoma: long term results. Radiol Oncol 2009; 43: 274-81. Žokalj I, Čulinović-Čaić R, Magaš Z, Pavčec Z, Saghir H, Igrec J, et al. Gastric gastrointestinal stromal

Open access
Gastric lipomatosis

REFERENCES 1. Jeong IH, Maeng YH. Gastric lipomatosis. J Gastric Cancer . 2010; 10:254-8. 2. Xiuli L, Wilcox CM, Nodit L, Lazenby AJ. Multiple gastrointestinal stromal tumors and lipomatosis. Arch Pathol Lab Med. 2008;132: 1825-9. 3. Aoyama S, Ami K, Fukuda A, Imai K, Chong JM, Ando M. Gastric lipomatosis treated by total gastrectomy: a case report. Surgical Case Reports . 2017;3:126. 4. Weinberg T, Feldman M. Lipomas of the gastrointestinal tract. Am J Clin Pathol . 1955;25:272-81. 5. Mills ES. Histology for Pathologists . 4

Open access
Molecular Biology and Genetic Mechanisms in the Progression of the Malignant Skin Melanoma

; 33(1): 33–7. 55. Willmore-Payne C, Layfield LJ, Holden JA. c-KIT mutation analysis for diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors in fine needle aspiration specimens. Cancer. 2005; 105(3): 165–70. 56. Fukuda R, Hamamoto N, Uchida Y et al. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor with a novel mutation of KIT proto-oncogene. Intern Med. 2001; 40(4): 301–3. 57. Curtin JA, Busam K, Pinkel D et al. Somatic activation of KIT in distinct subtypes of melanoma. J Clin Oncol. 2006; 24(26): 4340–6. 58. Cachia AR, Indsto JO, McLaren KM et al. CDKN2A mutation

Open access
in PRILOZI
Second primary cancers in patients with gastric cancer

: 418-25. Tepes B, Kavalar R. Gastric cancer, screening possibilities and proposals for endoscopic and histologic follow-up of premalignant gastric lesions. Zdrav Vest 2010; 79 : 366-74. Zokalj I, Culinovic-Caic R, Magas Z, Pavcec Z, Saghir H, Igrec J, et al. Gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumour. Radiol Oncol 2008; 42 : 187-95. Ohtani H, Yashiro M, Onoda N, Nishioka N, Kato Y, Yamamoto S, et al. Synchronous multiple primary gastrointestinal cancer exhibits frequent microsatellite

Open access
The role of Pazopanib in Soft Tissue Sarcoma: A comprehensive review of the literature

Glabbeke M, Verweij J, Judson I, Nielsen OS. Progression-freerate as the primary endpoint for phase II study in soft tissue sarcoma.European Journal of Cancer 2002;38:543-9. [9] Verweij J, van Oosterom A, Blay JY, et al. Imatinib mesylate (STI-571 Glivec, Gleevec) is an active agent for gastrointestinal stromal tumours, but does not yield responses in other soft-tissue sarcomas that are unselected for a molecular target. Results from an EORTC Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group phase II study. Eur J Cancer 2003; 39:2006. [10] Sleijfer S

Open access