Search Results

11 - 20 of 36 items :

  • "efficiency" x
  • IT-Security and Cryptology x
Clear All
Substring-Searchable Symmetric Encryption

Abstract

In this paper, we consider a setting where a client wants to outsource storage of a large amount of private data and then perform substring search queries on the data – given a data string s and a search string p, find all occurrences of p as a substring of s. First, we formalize an encryption paradigm that we call queryable encryption, which generalizes searchable symmetric encryption (SSE) and structured encryption. Then, we construct a queryable encryption scheme for substring queries. Our construction uses suffix trees and achieves asymptotic efficiency comparable to that of unencrypted suffix trees. Encryption of a string of length n takes On) time and produces a ciphertext of size On), and querying for a substring of length m that occurs k times takes Om+k) time and three rounds of communication. Our security definition guarantees correctness of query results and privacy of data and queries against a malicious adversary. Following the line of work started by Curtmola et al. (ACM CCS 2006), in order to construct more efficient schemes we allow the query protocol to leak some limited information that is captured precisely in the definition. We prove security of our substring-searchable encryption scheme against malicious adversaries, where the query protocol leaks limited information about memory access patterns through the suffix tree of the encrypted string.

Open access
A Practical Set-Membership Proof for Privacy-Preserving NFC Mobile Ticketing

Abstract

To ensure the privacy of users in transport systems, researchers are working on new protocols providing the best security guarantees while respecting functional requirements of transport operators. In this paper1, we design a secure NFC m-ticketing protocol for public transport that preserves users’ anonymity and prevents transport operators from tracing their customers’ trips. To this end, we introduce a new practical set-membership proof that does not require provers nor verifiers (but in a specific scenario for verifiers) to perform pairing computations. It is therefore particularly suitable for our (ticketing) setting where provers hold SIM/UICC cards that do not support such costly computations. We also propose several optimizations of Boneh-Boyen type signature schemes, which are of independent interest, increasing their performance and efficiency during NFC transactions. Our m-ticketing protocol offers greater flexibility compared to previous solutions as it enables the post-payment and the off-line validation of m-tickets. By implementing a prototype using a standard NFC SIM card, we show that it fulfils the stringent functional requirement imposed by transport operators whilst using strong security parameters. In particular, a validation can be completed in 184.25ms when the mobile is switched on, and in 266.52ms when the mobile is switched off or its battery is flat.

Open access
Reducing Metadata Leakage from Encrypted Files and Communication with PURBs

Abstract

Most encrypted data formats leak metadata via their plaintext headers, such as format version, encryption schemes used, number of recipients who can decrypt the data, and even the recipients’ identities. This leakage can pose security and privacy risks to users, e.g., by revealing the full membership of a group of collaborators from a single encrypted e-mail, or by enabling an eavesdropper to fingerprint the precise encryption software version and configuration the sender used.

We propose that future encrypted data formats improve security and privacy hygiene by producing Padded Uniform Random Blobs or PURBs: ciphertexts indistinguishable from random bit strings to anyone without a decryption key. A PURB’s content leaks nothing at all, even the application that created it, and is padded such that even its length leaks as little as possible.

Encoding and decoding ciphertexts with no cleartext markers presents efficiency challenges, however. We present cryptographically agile encodings enabling legitimate recipients to decrypt a PURB efficiently, even when encrypted for any number of recipients’ public keys and/or passwords, and when these public keys are from different cryptographic suites. PURBs employ Padmé, a novel padding scheme that limits information leakage via ciphertexts of maximum length M to a practical optimum of O(log log M) bits, comparable to padding to a power of two, but with lower overhead of at most 12% and decreasing with larger payloads.

Open access
Practical Forward-Secure Range and Sort Queries with Update-Oblivious Linked Lists

Abstract

We revisit the problem of privacy-preserving range search and sort queries on encrypted data in the face of an untrusted data store. Our new protocol RASP has several advantages over existing work. First, RASP strengthens privacy by ensuring forward security: after a query for range [a, b], any new record added to the data store is indistinguishable from random, even if the new record falls within range [a, b]. We are able to accomplish this using only traditional hash and block cipher operations, abstaining from expensive asymmetric cryptography and bilinear pairings. Consequently, RASP is highly practical, even for large database sizes. Additionally, we require only cloud storage and not a computational cloud like related works, which can reduce monetary costs significantly. At the heart of RASP, we develop a new update-oblivious bucket-based data structure. We allow for data to be added to buckets without leaking into which bucket it has been added. As long as a bucket is not explicitly queried, the data store does not learn anything about bucket contents. Furthermore, no information is leaked about data additions following a query. Besides formally proving RASP’s privacy, we also present a practical evaluation of RASP on Amazon Dynamo, demonstrating its efficiency and real world applicability.

Open access
Breach-Resistant Structured Encryption

Abstract

Motivated by the problem of data breaches, we formalize a notion of security for dynamic structured encryption (STE) schemes that guarantees security against a snapshot adversary; that is, an adversary that receives a copy of the encrypted structure at various times but does not see the transcripts related to any queries. In particular, we focus on the construction of dynamic encrypted multi-maps which are used to build efficient searchable symmetric encryption schemes, graph encryption schemes and encrypted relational databases. Interestingly, we show that a form of snapshot security we refer to as breach resistance implies previously-studied notions such as a (weaker version) of history independence and write-only obliviousness. Moreover, we initiate the study of dual-secure dynamic STE constructions: schemes that are forward-private against a persistent adversary and breach-resistant against a snapshot adversary. The notion of forward privacy guarantees that updates to the encrypted structure do not reveal their association to any query made in the past. As a concrete instantiation, we propose a new dual-secure dynamic multi-map encryption scheme that outperforms all existing constructions; including schemes that are not dual-secure. Our construction has query complexity that grows with the selectivity of the query and the number of deletes since the client executed a linear-time rebuild protocol which can be de-amortized. We implemented our scheme (with the de-amortized rebuild protocol) and evaluated its concrete efficiency empirically. Our experiments show that it is highly efficient with queries taking less than 1 microsecond per label/value pair.

Open access
Black-Box Accumulation: Collecting Incentives in a Privacy-Preserving Way

Abstract

We formalize and construct black-box accumulation (BBA), a useful building block for numerous important user-centric protocols including loyalty systems, refund systems, and incentive systems (as, e.g., employed in participatory sensing and vehicle-to-grid scenarios). A core requirement all these systems share is a mechanism to let users collect and sum up values (call it incentives, bonus points, reputation points, etc.) issued by some other parties in a privacy-preserving way such that curious operators may not be able to link the different transactions of a user. At the same time, a group of malicious users may not be able to cheat the system by pretending to have collected a higher amount than what was actually issued to them.

As a first contribution, we fully formalize the core functionality and properties of this important building block. Furthermore, we present a generic and non-interactive construction of a BBA system based on homomorphic commitments, digital signatures, and non-interactive zero-knowledge proofs of knowledge. For our construction, we formally prove security and privacy properties. Finally, we propose a concrete instantiation of our construction using Groth-Sahai commitments and proofs as well as the optimal structure-preserving signature scheme of Abe et al. and analyze its efficiency.

Open access
Hardware-Supported ORAM in Effect: Practical Oblivious Search and Update on Very Large Dataset

Abstract

The ability to query and update over encrypted data is an essential feature to enable breach-resilient cyber-infrastructures. Statistical attacks on searchable encryption (SE) have demonstrated the importance of sealing information leaks in access patterns. In response to such attacks, the community has proposed the Oblivious Random Access Machine (ORAM). However, due to the logarithmic communication overhead of ORAM, the composition of ORAM and SE is known to be costly in the conventional client-server model, which poses a critical barrier toward its practical adaptations.

In this paper, we propose a novel hardware-supported privacy-enhancing platform called Practical Oblivious Search and Update Platform (POSUP), which enables oblivious keyword search and update operations on large datasets with high efficiency. We harness Intel SGX to realize efficient oblivious data structures for oblivious search/update purposes. We implemented POSUP and evaluated its performance on a Wikipedia dataset containing ≥229 keyword-file pairs. Our implementation is highly efficient, taking only 1 ms to access a 3 KB block with Circuit-ORAM. Our experiments have shown that POSUP offers up to 70× less end-to-end delay with 100× reduced network bandwidth consumption compared with the traditional ORAM-SE composition without secure hardware. POSUP is also at least 4.5× faster for up to 99.5% of keywords that can be searched compared with state-of-the-art Intel SGX-assisted search platforms.

Open access
Privacy-Preserving Computation with Trusted Computing via Scramble-then-Compute

Abstract

We consider privacy-preserving computation of big data using trusted computing primitives with limited private memory. Simply ensuring that the data remains encrypted outside the trusted computing environment is insufficient to preserve data privacy, for data movement observed during computation could leak information. While it is possible to thwart such leakage using generic solution such as ORAM [42], designing efficient privacy-preserving algorithms is challenging. Besides computation efficiency, it is critical to keep trusted code bases lean, for large ones are unwieldy to vet and verify. In this paper, we advocate a simple approach wherein many basic algorithms (e.g., sorting) can be made privacy-preserving by adding a step that securely scrambles the data before feeding it to the original algorithms. We call this approach Scramble-then-Compute (StC), and give a sufficient condition whereby existing external memory algorithms can be made privacy-preserving via StC. This approach facilitates code-reuse, and its simplicity contributes to a smaller trusted code base. It is also general, allowing algorithm designers to leverage an extensive body of known efficient algorithms for better performance. Our experiments show that StC could offer up to 4.1× speedups over known, application-specific alternatives.

Open access
Automobile Driver Fingerprinting

Abstract

Today’s automobiles leverage powerful sensors and embedded computers to optimize efficiency, safety, and driver engagement. However the complexity of possible inferences using in-car sensor data is not well understood. While we do not know of attempts by automotive manufacturers or makers of after-market components (like insurance dongles) to violate privacy, a key question we ask is: could they (or their collection and later accidental leaks of data) violate a driver’s privacy? In the present study, we experimentally investigate the potential to identify individuals using sensor data snippets of their natural driving behavior. More specifically we record the in-vehicle sensor data on the controllerarea- network (CAN) of a typical modern vehicle (popular 2009 sedan) as each of 15 participants (a) performed a series of maneuvers in an isolated parking lot, and (b) drove the vehicle in traffic along a defined ~ 50 mile loop through the Seattle metropolitan area. We then split the data into training and testing sets, train an ensemble of classifiers, and evaluate identification accuracy of test data queries by looking at the highest voted candidate when considering all possible one-vs-one comparisons. Our results indicate that, at least among small sets, drivers are indeed distinguishable using only incar sensors. In particular, we find that it is possible to differentiate our 15 drivers with 100% accuracy when training with all of the available sensors using 90% of driving data from each person. Furthermore, it is possible to reach high identification rates using less than 8 minutes of training data. When more training data is available it is possible to reach very high identification using only a single sensor (e.g., the brake pedal). As an extension, we also demonstrate the feasibility of performing driver identification across multiple days of data collection

Open access
XPIR : Private Information Retrieval for Everyone

. Atallah and N. Hopper, eds.), vol. 6205 of Lecture Notes in Computer Science, pp. 93-110, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2010. [21] F. Olumofin and I. Goldberg, “Privacy-preserving queries over relational databases,” in Privacy Enhancing Technologies (M. Atallah and N. Hopper, eds.), vol. 6205 of Lecture Notes in Computer Science, pp. 75-92, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2010. [22] C. Devet and I. Goldberg, “The best of both worlds: Combining information-theoretic and computational pir for communication efficiency,” in Privacy Enhancing

Open access