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The Place and Role of The Father in Early Life

Abstract

The present paper is an attempt to create bridges of understanding between the subjective investigation in the psychoanalytic situation and the empirical research concerning a subject not enough explored in its earliest dimensions – the place and role of the father in the first year of the child’s life. As part of a more extensive empirical research on the dynamics of child development in the first year of life, the research presented in this article was built and articulated within the psychodynamic theories of development, it was conducted in the form of a standardized research and generated a series of results that are re-integrated into the psychoanalytic understanding, validating and being validated by psychoanalytic knowledge. The central point of this encounter between the psychodynamic understanding and the results of empirical research is that the father is an active presence in the development of the child from the first year of life, in a formula of internal and external triadic relationship and that one of the most important function of the father in this early stage of life is to facilitate a way for the child to build his own loving and creative relationship with the world.

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Mourning, Separation, Mental Space

Abstract

The work of mourning and organization of the mental space may be seriously disturbed by the real loss of the object and the way how communication with the “still alive” objects is built. Certain obstacles in communication with significant people make the mental separation difficult. The problem of separation, individuation and building of somebody’s own mental space is linked to the way in which the child mourns in relation to the central objects of early childhood. Especially the real loss of a parental object during the early childhood implies a traumatic moment which will excessively dramatize the oedipal issues. In this context, the analysis of the infantile material and development of an analytical work, which would perlaborate the trauma of the loss under a full oedipal conflict of one of the parents, as well as the subjectivation difficulties deriving from this trauma are the indispensable elements of a psychoanalytic work.

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Association of severity of depressive symptoms with sleep quality, social support and stress among Pakistani medical and dental students: A cross-sectional study

.0d44. 10.5116/ijme.55e6.0d44 26342190 Park KH Kim D Kim SK Yi YH Jeong JH Chae J et al The relationships between empathy, stress and social support among medical students Int J Med Educ 2015 6 103 8 10.5116/ijme.55e6.0d44 Popa-Velea O Diaconescu L Mihăilescu A Jidveian Popescu M Macarie G. Burnout and Its Relationships with Alexithymia, Stress, and Social Support among Romanian Medical Students: A Cross-Sectional Study. Int J Environ Res Public Health 2017a;14:560. doi:10.3390/ijerph14060560. 10.3390/ijerph14060560 Popa

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Editorial
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Vitality as a Theoretical and Technical Parameter in Psychoanalysis

Abstract

Terms such as vitality and authenticity are difficult to define. Moreover, they cannot be considered true psychoanalytic concepts. If, however, as is happening, psychoanalysis tries to theorize in a more fine-grained manner the non-specific aspects of treatment, such as those related to the person of the analyst, then it becomes inevitable to refer to them. The thesis of the article is that vitality should emerge from its vagueness and be transformed into a precise psychoanalytic concept. This can be done if we discuss it in light of Bion’s concept of negative capability and the post-Bionian theory of the analytic field. Every time the analyst rediscovers to his surprise the dreamlike dimension of the session, he becomes vital gain and reinvests the patient, the analysis and the psychoanalytic method.Then he realizes that he is always a character in the stories of the analysis and has the chance to try to guess what happens by relying on his intensified bodily or emotional reaction.

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Authenticity and Analytic Style

Abstract

The question that has prompted this article could be formulated as follows: what are the vicissitudes of the analyst’s subjectivity in the bi-personal models and, more specifically, in the Bion field model? Using a clinical vignette, the author shows his own “toy box” mainly the way he uses reverie and the interplay between plot and characters in the session.

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The Art of Fielding

Abstract

Bion created different theoretical tools to observe emotional transformations during a therapeutic session. In the relational field, these tools are particularly useful to observe how emotions create representations as steps in the transformation of further emotional experiences. Describing the complex unfolding of this process, Bion used the word “truth” to highlight the tension towards the unknown, the absolute unachievable named “O”.

The word ‘authenticity’ is close to the theoretical concept of ‘truth’, but it better describes and includes something pertaining to relational experience. Authenticity especially appears as a broader concept, which includes something about style and the ability to reach a sense of contentment and sharing together.

The author explores as authenticity goes through the form, not just the content, of language; a form capable of arousing surprise, wonder and transformation of the gaze. The optimal regulation of the intensity of feeling and the subjective quality of the words allow the latter to cross the relational field and to be received by the other subject. The goal for therapy that strives to reach the patient and allow a creative, subjective and full relational experience can be described (or summarized) with the word ‘authenticity’.

Open access
Establishing an Authentic Artistic Identity

Abstract

Shirin Neshat is an Iranian contemporary female artist who is in exile by choice. Born in Qazvin, Iran, in 1957, the artist moved to the United States in 1974 in order to study arts. Due to the Islamic Revolution in 1979, she was prevented from going back to her country. In 1990, after almost 12 years, Neshat visited Iran for the first time after the revolution, which transformed her artistic life into a productive one, full of prizes. The aim of this article is to reflect on the impact of Neshat’s homecoming experience in developing an authentic artistic identity. The emphasis of the paper will be on the artist’s first cinematic film, Turbulent (1998), which will be discussed as a manifestation of the artist’s working through the turbulent encounter with the changes in the motherland after a long separation due to the revolution.

Open access