Search Results

11 - 20 of 22 items :

  • "17th century" x
  • Linguistics and Semiotics x
Clear All
“When That Wounds Are Evil Healed”: Revisiting Pleonastic That in Early English Medical Writing

Abstract

The origin of pleonastic that can be traced back to Old English, where it could appear in syntactic constructions consisting of a preposition + a demonstrative pronoun (i.e., for py pat, for pæm pe) or a subordinator (i.e., op pat). The diffusion of this pleonastic form is an Early Middle English development as a result of the standardization of that as the general subordinator in the period, which motivated its use as a pleonastic word in combination with many kinds of conjunctions (i.e., now that, if that, when that, etc.) and prepositions (i.e., before that, save that, in that) (Fischer 1992: 295). The phenomenon increased considerably in Late Middle English, declining rapidly in the 17th century to such an extent that it became virtually obliterated towards the end of that same century (Rissanen 1999: 303-304). The list of subordinating elements includes relativizers (i.e., this that), adverbial relatives (i.e., there that), and a number of subordinators (i.e., after, as, because, before, beside, for, if, since, sith, though, until, when, while, etc.). The present paper examines the status of pleonastic that in the history of English pursuing the following objectives: (a) to analyse its use and distribution in a corpus of early English medical writing (in the period 1375-1700); (b) to classify the construction in terms of genre, i.e., treatises and recipes; and (c) to assess its decline with the different conjunctive words. The data used as source of evidence come from The Corpus of Early English Medical Writing, i.e., Middle English Medical Texts (MEMT for the period 1375-1500) and Early Modern English Medical Texts (EMEMT for the period 1500-1700). The use of pleonastic that in medical writing allows us to reconsider the history of the construction in English, becoming in itself a Late Middle English phenomenon with its progressive decline throughout the 16th and 17th centuries.

Open access
Translator’s Preface as a Genre: A Comparative Analysis of Lithuanian and English Prefaces

T. (1995). Correctness and clarity in applying for overseas jobs: a crosscultural analysis of U.S. and Flemish applications. Text 15.4, 457–476. Genette, G. (1987). Paratexts: Thresholds of Interpretation . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Gómez, M' C. B. (2003). The Preface as a Genre in English Translations in the 17th Century . Retrieved from https://www.google.lt/?gws_rd=ssl#q=Preface+as+a+Genre+in+English+Translations+in+the+17th+Century . Hosseinzadeh, M. (2015). Translatorial Prefaces: A Narrative Analysis Model. International

Open access
In How Far is Elckerlijc Dutch? References to the Dutch Origin in the Polish Reception of the Middle Dutch Text

Narodowy im. Ossolińskich. Borowski, A. 2007. Iter Polono-Belgo-Ollandicum: Cultural and Literary Relationships between the Commonwealth of Poland and the Netherlands in the 16th and 17th Centuries. Krakow: Księgarnia Akademicka. Brückner, A. 1902. “Zdziejow dawnego teatru polskiego.” Pamiętnik Literacki: czasopismo kwartalne poświęcone historiiikrytyce literatury polskiej 1(1/4): 539-556. Davidson, C., M.W. Walsh, en T.J. Broos, eds. 2007. Everyman and Its Dutch Original, Elckerlijc. Middle English Texts Series. Kalamazoo

Open access
“[…] Non urbs, tamen urbibus ipsa major.” The Image of The Hague in the Dutch Literature and Art of the 17th and 18th Century

. Blockmans, Wim, and Wouter Prevenier. 1997. De Bourgondiers: De Nederlanden op weg naar eenheid 1384-1350. Amsterdam: Meulenhoff / Leuven: Kritak. Borowski, Andrzej. 1987. Pojęcie i problem „Renesansu połnocnego.” Przyczynek do geografi i historycznoliterackiej humanizmu renesansowego połnocnego. Krakow: Uniwersytet Jagielloński. _____. 2007. Iter Polono-Belgo-Ollandicum: Cultural and Literary Relationships between the Commonwealth of Poland and the Netherlands in the 16th and 17th Centuries. Krakow: Księgarnia Akademicka

Open access
The Travelogue as a Mirror of Thought

Gouden Eeuw. Eds Thijs Weststeijn en Menno Jonker. Nijmegen en Haarlem: VanTilt en Frans Hals Museum/De Hallen. 65-73. Molhuysen, Philipp C en Peter J. Blok. 1927. Nieuw Nederlandsch Biografisch Woordenboek. Vol. 7. Leiden: Sijthoff. Naarden, Bruno et al. (eds.) 2018. The Fascination with Inner Eurasian Languages in the 17th Century. The Amsterdam Mayor Nicolaas Witsen and the Collection of ‘Tartarian’ Glossaries and Scripts . Amsterdam: Pegasus. Peters, Marion. 2010. De wijze koopman, Het wereldwijde onderzoek van Nicolaes Witsen (1641

Open access
Joachim Lelewel’s Edda of 1807

Sturluson. 1997. Transl. and ed. by Arnulf Krause. Stuttgart: Philipp Reclam jun. Edda Neckel Kuhn (1983) = Edda. Die Lieder des Codex Regius nebst verwandten Denkmälern. Vol.1: Text. 1983. Ed. by Gustav Neckel and Hans Kuhn. Heidelberg: Carl Winter. Edda Islandorum (1977) = Two versions of Snorra Edda from the 17th century. Vol. 2: Edda Islandorum Vǫluspá. Hávamál. P.H. Resen’s editions of 1665. 1977. Ed. by Anthony Faulkes. Reykjavík: Stofnun Árna Magnússonar á Íslandi. Edda poetycka. 1986. Transl. and ed. by Apolonia

Open access
Early Modern Multiloquent Authors (EMMA): Designing a large-scale corpus of individuals’ languages

Abstract

The present article provides a detailed description of the corpus of Early Modern Multiloquent Authors (EMMA), as well as two small case studies that illustrate its benefits. As a large-scale specialized corpus, EMMA tries to strike the right balance between big data and sociolinguistic coverage. It comprises the writings of 50 carefully selected authors across five generations, mostly taken from the 17th-century London society. EMMA enables the study of language as both a social and cognitive phenomenon and allows us to explore the interaction between the individual and aggregate levels.

The first part of the article is a detailed description of EMMA’s first release as well as the sociolinguistic and methodological principles that underlie its design and compilation. We cover the conceptual decisions and practical implementations at various stages of the compilation process: from text-markup, encoding and data preprocessing to metadata enrichment and verification.

In the second part, we present two small case studies to illustrate how rich contextualization can guide the interpretation of quantitative corpus-linguistic findings. The first case study compares the past tense formation of strong verbs in writers without access to higher education to that of writers with an extensive training in Latin. The second case study relates s/th-variation in the language of a single writer, Margaret Cavendish, to major shifts in her personal life.

Open access
The Swift and Secret Messenger: John Wilkins’s Mercury and the Paradoxes of Language

seventeenth century. Journal of the History of Ideas 41.2. 319-329. Eco, Umberto, Richard Rorty, Jonathan Culler & Christine Brooke-Rose. 1992. Interpretation and overinterpretation. Edited by Stefan Collini. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Eco, Umberto. 1995. The search for the perfect language: Making of Europe. Trans. James Fentress. Malden: Blackwell Publishing. Formigari, Lia. 1988. Language and experience in 17th-century British philosophy. Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamin Publishing Company

Open access
A Testimonie’S Stance: Editorial Positioning in Ælfric’S Sermo in die Pascae

References Berkhout, Carl T. - Milton McC. Gatch (eds.) 1982 Anglo-Saxon scholarship . Boston: G. K. Hall Biber, Douglas - Stig Johansson - Geoffrey Leech - Susan Conrad - Edward Finegan 1999 Longman grammar of spoken and written English . London: Longman. Magennis, Hugh - Mary Swan 2009 A companion to Ælfric . Leiden: Brill. Bækken, Bjørg 2002 “ Yet this fillie doth many times assault the brauest minds : Affirmative declarative do in 17th-Century English”, Nordic Journal of English

Open access
“Speaking Pictures”: Ways of Seeing and Reading in English Renaissance Culture

. Iconologia, overo, Descrittione di diverse imagini cavate dall'antichità, & di propria inventione. Roma: Appresso Lepido Facii. Ripa, Cesare. N.d. Introduction to the Iconologia or Hieroglyphical Figures of Cesare Ripa, Knight of Perugia . Transcription of the 17 th -century British Library Ms. Add 23195: https://www.levity.com/alchemy/iconol_i.html (accessed on 24 October 2014). Ripa, Cesare. 1779. A Collection of Emblematical Figures. Chiefly composed from the Iconology of Cavaliere Cesare Ripa, Perugino . Translated by George Richardson. London: Printed

Open access