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El-Shaddai Deva

Références bibliographiques Bandia, Paul. Translation as Reparation : Writing and Translation in Postcolonial Africa . Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2014a. Bandia, Paul, « African European-Language Literature and Writing as Translation : some ethical issues ». In : Hermans, Theo (dir.). Translating Others. Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2014b : 349-361. Berman, Antoine. L’épreuve de l’étranger : Culture et traduction dans l’Allemagne romantique : Herder, Goethe, Schlegel, Novalis, Humboldt, Schleiermacher, Hölderlin . Pciris : Gallimard

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Robert Krzyżek

(2), pp. 161-181. DOI: 10.2478/geocart-2014-0012 Krzyżek, R. (2015a). Algorithm for modeling coordinates of corners of buildings determined with RTN GNSS technology using vector translation method. Artificial Satellites Journal of Planetary Geodesy, 50(3), pp. 115-125. DOI: 10.1515/arsa-2015-0009 Krzyżek, R. (2015b). Mathematical analysis of the algorithms used in modernized methods of building measurements with RTN GNSS technology. Boletim de Ciências Geodésicas, 21(4), pp. 848-866 Krzyżek, R.(2015c). Modernization of the

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András Zopus

Abstract

My study aims to scrutinize the extent to which bilingualism and diglossia influence Transylvanian translators’ texts when the target language is Hungarian. While studying the narrower and wider interpretations of these linguistic phenomena, we may find that all the conditions are given that are required for us to say: Transylvanian translators’ bilingualism and diglossia may be considered as facts, and socio-lingual effects become tangible in various translations.

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Gordana Dimković Telebaković

Abstract

The primary purpose of this article is to propose standard Serbian terminological expressions for 140 English telecommunications and postal traffic terms. To achieve this aim, we adopt a synchronic lexico-semantico-translation approach and develop an eight-principle translation and standardisation model. The results of the study clearly show that Anglicisms, synonymous and polysemous terminological units, terminological gaps and imprecise translation terms cause problems. Some solutions are suggested to bridge terminological inaccuracy and to set the standard status of certain Serbian terms.

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Katalin Lajos

Abstract

“As every inhabited area, culturally Transylvania can also be conceived of mainly as a symbolic space. Starting from its physical, material reality, our perceptions are made up into a subjective image of the area in question. This is the real Transylvania, or rather, the place in connection with which we formulate our ideas and to which we adjust our deeds. This image may seem so real also because it is equally shared by many, occasionally several millions. If many see things in the same way, we could say, this means that they are so in reality, though most of the time we only share prejudices, clichés and misunderstandings” - Sorin Mitu writes. Comparative imagology examines the formation of these collective ideas as well as the issues of identity and attitude to the Other. As a member of the imagology research group at the Department of Humanities of Sapientia Hungarian University of Transylvania, Miercurea Ciuc, Romania, I translated one chapter of Sorin Mitu’s volume entitled Transilvania mea [My Transylvania]. During the translation process it became obvious to me that if translation is not only linguistic but also cultural transmission, it is especially true for the translation of historical works and that it would be worth examining whether some kind of rapprochement could be detected between the Romanian and Hungarian historical research of the past decades; if yes, whether this is reflected in the mutual translation of the respective works

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Elena Rodríguez Murphy

-Colonial Literatures. Lon don/New York: Routledge, 1989. Print. Bandia, P. F. “Translocation: Translation, Migration and The Relocation of Cultures.” A Companion to Translation Studies. Eds. S. Bermann and C. Porter. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2014. 273-284. Print. ---. “An Interview with Professor Paul Bandia.” Interview by Elena Rodriguez Murphy. Perspectives. Studies in Translatology, vol. 23, no. 1. 2015: 143-154. Print. Bhabha, Homi. The Location of Culture. London/New York: Routledge, 1994. Print. Brancato

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Zu theoretischen und praktischen Aspekten des Fachübersetzens I.

Verwendbarkeit von Textkorpora für das Fachübersetzen und für die Übersetzungswissenschaft

Olivia Seidl-Péch

References Baker, Mona. 1993. Corpus Linguistics and Translation Studies. Implications and Applications. In: Baker, Mona-Francis, Gill-Tognini-Bonelli, Elena. (eds). Text and Technology: In Honour of John Sinclair. Amsterdam-Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 233-250. Baker, Mona. 1995. Corpora in Translation Studies. An Overview and Some Suggestions for Future Research. Target 7/2. 223-243. Davies, Mark. 1990-2015. Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA). http

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Iulia Cosma

), Georgiana Lungu-Badea (coord.). Timişoara: Editura Universităţii de Vest, 2006. Repertoriul traducerilor româneşti din limbile franceză, italiană, spaniolă (secolele al XVIII-lea şi al XIX-lea). Studii de istorie a traducerii (II), Georgiana Lungu-Badea (coord. ). Timişoara: Editura Universităţii de Vest, 2006. Un capitol de traductologie românească. Studii de istorie a traducerii (III), Georgiana Lungu-Badea (coord.). Timişoara: Editura Universităţii de Vest, 2008. Lâutarulu abridged and translated by M.A. Canini şi I

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Márta Minier

Abstract

This article explores a theatre performance (National Theatre Pécs, 2003, dir. Iván Hargitai) working with a 1999 Hungarian translation of Hamlet by educator, scholar, translator and poet Ádám Nádasdy as a structural transformation (Fischer-Lichte 1992) of the dramatic text for the stage. The performance is perceived as an intersemiotic translation but not as one emerging from a source-to-target one-way route. The study focuses on certain substructures such as the set design and the multimedial nature of the performance (as defined by Giesekam 2007), and by highlighting intertextual and hypertextual ways of accessing this performance-as-translation it questions the ‘of’ in the ‘performance of Hamlet (or insert other dramatic title)’ phrase. This experimentation with the terminology around performance-as-translation also facilitates the unveiling of a layer of the complex Hungarian Hamlet palimpsest, which, as a multi-layered cultural phenomenon, consists of much more than literary texts: its fabric includes theatre performance and other creative works.

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Anita Hegedűs

Abstract

Introduction: This paper undertakes to investigate the connection between two approaches to scoring translation by examining 115 test papers of the translation component of the C1 level PROFEX English for Medical Purposes (EMP) exam. The main objective of the study is to reveal whether, and to what extent, the method of assessment influences the score.

Material and method: The test papers were scored independently by two experienced raters according to the marking scale of the PROFEX EMP exam, then holistic scoring was carried out by a third rater, who was uninformed of the official scores for the test papers. Correlations were calculated, first between the holistic scores and the official scores based on the combined holistic and discrete point approach, then between other components of the written part of PROFEX EMP exam (reading comprehension and writing) and the holistic scores and the scores reached with the combined method, respectively.

Results: A strong correlation has been revealed between the scores achieved by the purely holistic method and those assessed with the combined holistic and discrete point approach. The holistic method was shown to be slightly more reliable than the combined approach.

Conclusion: The study has revealed that the method of assessment does not significantly influence the score in the evaluation of translation in the PROFEX EMP exam.