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Benoni Sfârlog and Daniel-Sorin Constantin

Abstract

The military leader is the central pillar of the military structures whose functionalism is sustained and enhanced by the exercise of effective leadership. Explaining the role and place of the military leader in an organizational context creates prerequisites for the identification of his/her action aspects, in situations specific to the military organization at peace or during war. On this basis, it is possible to outline the sphere of competences of the military leader from the point of view of the defining features of the reference level at which the leader exercises his prerogatives. The content of the competences and the correlations established in their integrated system are the basis for operational and formative investigations and substantiation

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Ricardo G. Lugo, Stefan Sütterlin, Benjamin J. Knox, Øyvind Jøsok, Kirsi Helkala and Natalie Marie Lande

1 Introduction The rapid progress in cyber threats and cyber security has dominated political thinking to an increased extent and has facilitated the development of national cyber defense strategies in recent years. In network-centric warfare, this has opened space for a new type of astute cyber planner and talented computer network defense operator. These individuals and teams now fulfill a crucial role in defending identified and unidentified network vulnerabilities across countless vectors against unknown threats. Still bound to traditional military

Open access

Kim Janssen and Piet Wit

Abstract

This paper describes a recently developed training module on the “ecosystem approach”, with the military as target group. Initiated by NATO-affiliated Civil-Military Co-operation Centre of Excellence (CIMIC COE), the module fits into a multidisciplinary new training approach, in which the military learns to integrate specific concepts into their missions, such as environmental issues. In developing the training module, a combination of the Rapid Ecological Assessment (REA) and Rapid Rural Appraisal (RRA) techniques has been formed into a stepwise approach for military to enable them to quickly scan and analyse important environmental issues in their mission environments. The result of the training module is an instructive publication and an attached instruction card, the latter being a tool commonly used by military

Open access

Mircea Vladu, Stelian Popescu, Ioan Dan Popa and Florin Ilie

Abstract

The applications highlighted the fact that, in crisis situations and war time, there were military negotiations, in which the partners have proven their unfairness and stiffness. The inflexibility and unfairness of the negotiator resides in the fact that he used incorrect tactics⦋1], especially subterfuges, for obtaining advantages. About this negotiating partner we would like to have the following discussion

Open access

Valentina V. Pidlisnyuk, Larry E. Erickson, Josef Trögl, Pavlo Y. Shapoval, Jan Popelka, Lawrence C. Davis, Tetyana R. Stefanovska and Ganga M. Hettiarachchi

). Preliminary results on growing second generation biofuel crop miscanthus x giganteus at the polluted military site in Ukraine. Nova Biotechnol. Chim . 15(1), 77–84. DOI: 10.1515/nbec-2016-0008. 29. Stefanovska, T., Pidlisnyk, V. & Tomashkin, J. (2015). Growing second generation biofuel plant Miscanthus x giganteus at military soils contaminated with heavy metals. Bioenergy . 1, 50–53. (in Ukrainian). 30. Andersen, J. (2000, February) Management of contaminated sites and land in Central and Eastern Europe. Retrieved June 2, 2017, from http

Open access

Anne Koskinen and Jorma Jormakka

-193. [16] J. Jormakka and J. Lucenius: “Architectural Aspects of Migrating C4I2SR Systems to Service-Oriented Architecture,” IEEE/IARIA ICDT 2010, 2010, June 13-19, Athens. [17] A. Koskinen: “Maritime Situational Awareness and usability - Operators point of View,” User’s view on battlespace systems (eds. J. Jormakka, S. Oksa), Finnish National Defence, University Department of Military Technology Series 3 No 9, 2009, p. 23-41. [18] J. Langan-Fox, M. J.Sankey, and J. M. Canty: “Human Factors Measurement for Future Air Traffic Control

Open access

Ingrida Gečienė-Janulionė

Abstract

In recent years, Lithuania’s changing geopolitical environment because of the military conflict between Russia and Ukraine has increased the potential military threat that inevitably affects the subjective perception of security of the population. Based on the data from representative surveys and interviews conducted in 2014 and 2016, the article examines Lithuanians’ subjective perception of external military threats in the new geopolitical context, the impact of this perception on their coping strategies and the factors that have an impact on the selection of these strategies. The article is based on Buzan’s (1983, 1991, 2007) theoretical insights into subjective security and the sociological subjective security analysis approach of Inglehart and Norris (2012), applying it to the practically unexplored subjective response (strategies chosen by individuals) to the research into the field of military threat field. These two theoretical approaches allow the analysis of how a country’s population comprehends threats to its security amid a changing geopolitical context and the examination of the impact of different groups and approaches in society when selecting coping strategies. The article argues that the perception of security changes over time, as following the events that created the feeling of insecurity in the first place, the feeling of security again starts to rise gradually. In addition, knowledge of not only the current geopolitical context but also the historical experience is important, as in societies that have undergone radical political transformations, attitudes towards the existing democratic and former Soviet regimes play a rather major part in determining subjective security. The subjective security of different social groups and their selected coping strategies also differ, as it is the most vulnerable social groups that feel least safe. The least vulnerable social groups are most inclined to defend their country, whereas more vulnerable groups choose to be passive or to look after themselves and their families first and foremost.

Open access

Johan Sigholm

, Department of Defense Cyberspace Policy Report, Report to Congress Pursuant to the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2011, Section 934, Nov. 2011. [63] United Nations Charter, Article 2(4). Available: http://www.un.org/aboutun/charter/ [64] United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), “The Globalization of Crime: A Transnational Organized Crime Threat Assessment,” United Nations publication E.10.IV.6, 2010. [65] United States Department of Defense, “Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms,” Joint

Open access

Václav Zajiček, Jaromír Mareš, Jaroslav Talár and Martin Novotny

References [1] NATO Logistics Handbook, Brussels: NATO Graphics & Printing, 2012. ISBN 978-92-845-0190-8. [2] REJZEK, Martin, Místo a úloha dopravních jednotek, Brno: Vydavatelská skupina Univerzity obrany, 2010. ISBN 978-80-7231-763-9. [3] MILIĆEVIĆ, Milić; SOKOLOVIĆ, Vlada; MILENKOV, Marjan, Repairable spare parts flow in a multi-echelon inventory system. VOJNOTEHNIČKI GLASNIK / MILITARY TECHNICAL COURIER,, 2016, Vol. 64, No. 1, pp. 110-129.. [4] PETRESKI, Drage; ILIEV, Andrej; GJUROV, Lazar

Open access

Eugeniusz Sobczyński and Jerzy Pietruszka

Abstract

The article presents a review of contemporary Polish military topographic maps, with special focus on those in the scale of 1:50,000. They are basic maps used in all armies of NATO countries at tactical stages.

After the political breakthrough of 1989 Polish political elites saw the future of our country in the structures of Western Europe, but the Warsaw Pact still existed, and Soviet Army units were stationed in Poland and in the German Democratic Republic. All the Warsaw Pact countries used maps in the “1942” coordinate system and followed standardized rules of map elaboration. The article presents transformation of those maps into NATO standards, the first stage of which was elaboration of the, so-called, maps adapted to NATO standards.

At the end of 1990s there started elaboration of a new topographic map of Poland in the scale of 1:50,000. The project involved preparation of a level 2 map, in NATO nomenclature known as VMap Level 2, and simultaneously using the same base for to generate 580 sheets of a paper map in 1:50,000. Map elaboration finished in 2006 and in the following years the project was enhanced with publication of new maps based on high-resolution image data.

Since 2003 Polish cartographers have been participating in Multinational Geospatial Co-production Program (MGCP). Within the program high-resolution vector data is being prepared for selected areas of interest. They are mainly areas of current or potential military conflict, terrorist threat, ethnic or religious conflict, natural disaster, etc. MGCP data is not a ready product meant for direct usage, and without proper preparation it is simply unreadable. Therefore, special computer applications were developed to facilitate fast preparation of topographic maps in 1:50,000: MGCP Derived Graphic (MDG) and lately MGCP Topographic Map (MTM). Such maps differ from Polish topographic maps both in contents (to a lesser extent) and in graphic form (to a larger extent). They contain less objects, but include aerial information.