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Seyed Ardebili, Irena Zajc, Boris Gole, Benito Campos, Christel Herold-Mende, Sara Drmota and Tamara Lah

References Louis DN, Ohgaki H, Wiestler OD, Cavenee WK, Burger PC, Jouvet A, et al. The 2007 WHO classification of tumours of the central nervous system. Acta Neuropathol 2007; 114 : 97-109. Pilkington GJ. Cancer stem cells in the mammalian central nervous system. Cell Prolif 2005; 38 : 423-33. Baur M, Preusser M, Piribauer M, Elandt K, Hassler M, Hudec M. Frequent MGMT (0(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase) hypermethylation in long-term survivors of glioblastoma: a single

Open access

Marina Gazdic, Vladislav Volarevic and Miodrag Stojkovic

REFERENCES 1. Volarevic V, Erceg S, Bhattacharya SS, Stojkovic P, Horner P, Stojkovic M. Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury. Cell Transplantation 2013; 22(8):1309-23. 2. Lukovic D, Moreno Manzano V, Stojkovic M, Bhattacharya SS, Erceg S. Concise review: human pluripotent stem cells in the treatment of spinal cord injury. Stem Cells 2012; 30(9):1787-92. 3. Rowland JW, Hawryluk GW, Kwon B, Fehlings MG. Current status of acute spinal cord injury pathophysiology and emerging therapies: Promise on the horizon. Neurosurg. Focus 2008; 25:E2

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C. Randall Harrell, Crissy Fellabaum, Bojana Simovic Markovic, Aleksandar Arsenijevic and Vladislav Volarevic

References 1. Gazdic M, Volarevic V, Arsenijevic N, Stojkovic M. Mesenchymal stem cells: a friend or foe in immunemediated diseases. Stem Cell Rev 2015;11:280-287. 2. Volarevic V, Ljujic B, Stojkovic P, Lukic A, Arsenijevic N, Stojkovic M. Human stem cell research and regenerative medicine-present and future. Br Med Bull 2011;99:155-168. 3. Volarevic V, Gazdic M, Simovic Markovic B, Jovicic N, Djonov V, Arsenijevic N. Mesenchymal stem cellderived factors: Immunomodulatory effects and therapeutic potential

Open access

Romulus Fabian Tatu, Mihai Hurmuz and Cătălin Adrian Miu

ligament graft. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc . 2008;16:224-231. 8. Claes S, Verdonk P, Forsyth R, Bellemans J. The “ligamentization” process in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: what happens to the human graft? A systematic review of the literature. Am J Sports Med . 2011;39:2476-2483. 9. Rizzello G, Longo UG, Petrillo S, et al. Growth Factors and Stem Cells for the Management of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears. Open Orthop J . 2012;6:525-530. 10. Bissell L, Tibrewal S, Sahni V, Khan WS. Growth factors and platelet rich plasma in

Open access

Meri Kirijas and Mirko Spiroski

Abstract

Major histocompatibility complex class 1 chain-related genes (MIC) are part of the non-classical MHC genes located on the short arm of chromosome 6. MICA comprises of approximately 11 kb DNA and encodes polypeptide of 383 amino acids. The expression of MICA is limited to the surface of the epithelial cells, fibroblasts, keratinocytes and monocytes, but not on the surface of CD4+, CD8+ and CD19+ lymphocytes. It manifests its role by binding with the NK cell receptor NKG2D. There are 84 different alleles for MICA due to discovered polymorphisms in the exons 2 to 5. The aim of this review is to present the data known so far about the association of MICA with different diseases and the role of anti-MICA antibodies in organ and stem cell transplantation. The frequency of different MICA alleles and their association with different HLAB alleles, as well as the association of MICA with different inflammatory diseases, infection diseases and tumors was determined. Post- and pre-transplant anti-MICA antibodies are associated with antibody-mediated rejection in kidney and heart transplantation. Patients with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, which have MICA mismatch, have higher frequency of graft versus host disease episodes. In spite of lack of conclusive data about the role of anti- MICA antibodies in organ and stem cell transplantation, there is still clinical relevance for investigation of the polymorphisms of the MICA gene and anti-MICA antibodies.

Open access

Anna Borgosz-Guźda

Jakość życia pacjenta po zawale mięśnia sercowego leczonego PTCA, komórkami macierzystymi szpiku i poddanego rehabilitacji kardiologicznej. Opis przypadku

Celem pracy była ocena jakości życia pacjenta po zawale mięśnia sercowego, leczonego PTCA i komórkami macierzystymi szpiku, a także poddanego rehabilitacji kardiologicznej. Materiał i metoda: badanie przy pomocy kwestionariusza SF-36 wykonano około 2 lata po zawale. Pacjent: mężczyzna, 46 lat, z zawałem serca trafił do szpitala im. Jana Pawła II w Krakowie, gdzie przeprowadzono zabieg PTCA oraz wszczepienie komórek macierzystych szpiku celem regeneracji uszkodzonego niedokrwieniem mięśnia sercowego. Pacjent przeszedł także rehabilitację szpitalną, sanatoryjną w Polanicy Zdrój oraz kontynuuje rehabilitację w warunkach domowych. Wnioski: w porównaniu z wynikami innych badaczy można stwierdzić, że pacjent po PTCA, komórkach macierzystych i rehabilitacji kardiologicznej uzyskał wyższe wyniki w zakresie wszystkich skal, za wyjątkiem RP (ograniczenia z powodu zdrowia fizycznego), w porównaniu z wynikami innych chorych po zawale mięśnia sercowego. Ogólna ocena jakości życia i całkowite zdrowie psychiczne okazały się także wyższe od wartości uzyskanych przez pacjentów wyłącznie po PTCA, jedynie wartość całkowitego zdrowia fizycznego okazała się niższa. Ogólna jakość życia okazała się również wyższa w porównaniu z wynikami uzyskanymi przez pacjentów po CABG.

Open access

M. Pawlyta, K. Labisz and K. Matus

Abstract

Aluminium recycling is cost-effective and beneficial for the environment. It is expected that this trend will continue in the future, and even will steadily increase. The consequence of the use of recycled materials is variable and difficult to predict chemical composition. This causes a significant reduction in the production process, since the properties of produced alloy are determined by the microstructure and the presence of precipitates of other phases. For this reason, the type and order of formation of precipitates were systematically investigated in recent decades. These studies involved, however, only the main systems (Al-Cu, Al-Mg-Si, Al-Cu-Mg, Al-Mg-Si-Cu), while more complex systems were not analysed. Even trace amounts of additional elements can significantly affect the alloy microstructure and composition of precipitates formed. This fact is particularly important in the case of new technologies such as laser surface treatment. As a result of extremely high temperature and temperature changes after the laser remelting large amount of precipitates are observed. Precipitates are nanometric in size and have different morphology and chemical composition. A full understanding of the processes that occur during the laser remelting requires their precise but also time effectively phase identification, which due to the diversity and nanometric size, is a major research challenge. This work presents the methodology of identification of nanometer phase precipitates in the alloy AlSi9Cu, based on the simultaneous TEM imaging and chemical composition analysis using the dispersion spectroscopy using the characteristic X-ray. Verification is performed by comparing the simulation unit cell of the identified phase with the experimental high-resolution image.

Open access

Halim Cevizci

References Boshoff D., Webber-Youngman R. C. W., 2011. Testing stemming performance, possible or not? The J. ofthe South African Inst. of Min. and Metall., December, p. 871-874. Cevizci H., 2012. A newly developed plaster stemming method for blasting. The J. of the South African Inst. of Min. and Metall., December, p. 1071-1078. Cevizci H., Özkahraman H. T., 2012. The effect of blast hole stemming length to rockpile fragmentation at limestone quarries. International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences, vol. 53, p. 32-35. Devine J., Beck

Open access

Ramya Prasanthi Mokkapati, Jayasravanthi Mokkapati and Venkata Nadh Ratnakaram

, G.M., Chen, L., Deng, J.H., Zhang, X.R. & Niu, Q.Y. (2012). Copper (II) removal by pectin–iron oxide magnetic nanocomposite adsorbent. Chem. Eng. J. 185, 100–107. DOI: 10.1016/j.cej.2012.01.050. 21. Li, K., Fu, S., Zhan, H., Zhan, Y. & Lucia, L. (2010). Analysis of the chemical composition and morphological structure of banana pseudo-stem. Bioresources 5(2), 576–585. DOI: 10.15376/biores.5.2.576-585 22. Firdous, R. & Gilani, A.H. (2001). Changes in chemical composition of sorghum as influenced by growth stages and cultivar. Asian Australas. J

Open access

Eszter Mild, Erzsébet Lázár, Judit-Beáta Köpeczi, Enikő Kakucs, Marius Găzdac, Annamária Pakucs, Cezara Tudor and István Benedek

REFERENCES 1. Korbling M, Anderlini P. Peripheral blood stem cell versus bone marrow allotransplantation: does the source of hematopoietic stem cell matter? Blood . 2001;98:2900-2908. 2. To LB, Haylock DN, Simmons PJ, Juttner CA. The biology and clinical uses of blood stem cells. Blood . 1997; 89:2233-2258. 3. Jillella AP, Ustun C. What is the optimum number of CD34 peripheral blood stem cells for an autologous transplant? Stem Cells Dev . 2004;13:598-606. 4. Vose JM, Ho AD, Coiffier B, et al. Advances in mobilization for the