Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 101 items for

  • Keyword: social media x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

Selami Özsoy

Use of New Media by Turkish Fans in Sport Communication: Facebook and Twitter

This research examines the use of Facebook and Twitter, two social networks, for sportive reasons in Turkey.

To this end, the literature was surveyed and a 5 Likert type data collection tool consisting of 21 questions was developed by the researcher based on the expert views. The sample of the research included 460 sport fans who are college students at Abant İzzet Baysal University and Sakarya University.

It was found in the research that 91.7% of the participants had a profile on Facebook and 13.3% had a profile on Twitter. The rate of opening an account on Twitter, which still has no version in Turkish language, was low. It was found that the fans mostly followed the official site of their favorite team on Facebook, got informed about the sports activities through Facebook and learned news, which they did not hear from other sources. It was also ascertained that male fans used social networks for sportive reasons more than female fans did (p<.05). It is possible to state that social networks such as Facebook and Twitter have become a rapidly-developing alternative medium in sports against traditional media such as newspaper and television.

Open access

Dominika Kaczorowska-Spychalska

Abstract

A role of social media in a communication process with a contemporary customer is systematically increasing, which is reflected in a size of marketing budgets allocated to this objective. Hence, people have always shared their opinions, remarks, and feelings, and social networking sites are perfect space for that purpose. Brands, which will understand the social media essence and lead a narration with their customers in a creative way, have an opportunity to last longer in their awareness. However, it is worth to consider what the customers expect and what they are inspired by which makes them active in social networking services.

Open access

Janina Stankiewicz and Hanna Bortnowska

Summary

Internet has become an important way of our image creation, including the professional one. By participating in social media, it is possible to shape our own image not only in eyes of private persons, but also of potential employers. The aim of the article is to identify activities which were undertaken by young participants in labour market (students) associated with creating their own professional image in social media. It was found that they usually concentrated on shaping private relationships, as well as the development of their knowledge of the subjects which were not connected with work or job and also on sharing that knowledge with other users of social media. In contrast, much less attention they paid on creating their own professional image and the development of their careers.

Open access

The Globalization of the Pavement

A Tanzanian Case Study

Ylva Ekström, Anders Høg Hansen and Hugo Boothby

Abstract

This article investigates examples of citizen media production and communication (blogs and social media sites in Tanzania and its diasporas) in the immediate aftermath of the Gongo la Mboto blasts in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, February 2011.

At the centre is the relationship between media use and communication practices of the pavement - drawing from the notion of pavement radio - and the spaceship, i.e. a metaphor for traditional mass media, exemplified by policies and practices of the BBC and its World Service.

We argue that new social media practices as digital pavement radio are converging with traditional forms of street buzz and media use. Forms of oral communication are adapting towards the digital and filling information voids in an informal economy of news and stories in which media practices are stimulated by already ingrained traditions. An existing oral culture is paving the way for a globalization of the pavement.

Open access

Mircea Fuciu, Ruxandra Lazea and Luigi Dumitrescu

Abstract

The usage of online social networks (OSN) in the last decade has changed the manner in which the individuals and especially the young people / students communicate with each other. The aim of our research paper, which is a part of a larger study, is to identify the manner in which the online social networks influence the communication process of the students from Sibiu and Alba Counties of Romania. The present marketing research is a quantitative one, based on a questionnaire that provides a clear insight on what are the main OSN used by the students and it shows how or if the students use the OSN to express their feelings and emotions. The research also shows the influence in the communication process between students and teachers, it points out the main reasons for using such a communication tool and activities undertaken by the students on their preferred OSN.

Open access

Beth L. Fossen and David A. Schweidel

Abstract

Social TV is the simultaneous consumption of television alongside social media chatter about the programming. This topic is highly relevant for marketers. Usually it is considered as a bad thing for TV advertisers. While there can be distraction from the ads, marketers can also benefit from positive effects. Consumers’ multiscreen activities can be used to attract more viewers, to leverage TV campaigns and to increase sales. This chatter creates free exposure for the brand online, extends the reach of television ad campaigns to the online space, and offers real-time feedback to advertisers on how their ads are being received. To take advantage of social TV, marketers need to develop a social media and ad design strategy for TV shows. Not every “social show” is good for them. Many programs receive a high volume of program-related chatter at the expense of advertiser-related word-of-mouth, but some programs generate high levels of online conversations that can also benefit their advertisers. Marketers are well served to identify those programs that are conducive to advertiser-related chatter. Also, specific ad designs can further encourage buzz.

Open access

Selcan Kilis, Yasemin Gülbahar and Christian Rapp

Abstract

With the excessive use of social media in the 21st century, attempts to integrate social media within higher education have also increased. In this area, research has been particularly focused on the aspects of students, rather than the instructors. This study puts the emphasis on the instructors with the aim to explore their use of social media in educational settings. Their respective teaching preferences were explored, from a pedagogical perspective, with the help of a Social Media Toolkit. The toolkit was developed to guide instructors that want to integrate social media in their teaching. This study was designed as a descriptive study and quantitative data was collected from 583 instructors from 39 countries. The participants responded to four main questions in an online environment. Results revealed that instructors mostly prefer to teach their subject at the applying and understanding levels. They frequently use text-based materials and design their courses as problem-based or on a presentation model. They mostly prefer to assess students using alternative methods based on their performance, like portfolios, group works, etc. whilst classical methods were also preferred. Overall findings indicated that any instructor from any discipline or culture can transform courses onto a social media platform thanks to many different and varied features provided by social media tools.

Open access

Matti Santtila, Kalle Grönqvist, Jussi Räisänen and Heikki Kyröläinen

Summary

Study aim: the purpose of the present study was to survey the impact of a social media platform on physical fitness, physical activity levels and daily sitting time.

Material and methods: a total of 2039 users (1445 women and 594 men) of the social media service (HeiaHeia, Helsinki, Finland) voluntarily participated in the study by answering an online questionnaire provided by a survey.

Results: about 63.8% of the participants reported that the service has advanced their perceived level of physical fitness, while 36.2% reported no impact on their fitness. Most participants (71.3%) with BMI over 25 reported that the service had helped them to improve their physical fitness. Participants with BMI over 35 reported a more positive impact than in any other weight range groups. One-third of the participants (32.3%) sat for more than seven hours a day; 23.5% sat less than five hours a day. More than half of the participants (56.8%) were encouraged to be physical active during the day and aimed to reduce sitting time at their jobs during the workday.

Conclusions: there seems to be a positive impact of web services that promote physical activity on the physical fitness among social media users. Although the present service is not merely well suited for physically active and physical fit users, it motivates users of all fitness levels to exercise. However, more studies are needed to clarify effects of social media on physical activity, fitness and health.

Open access

Risk, Crisis, and Social Media

A systematic review of seven years’ research

Joel Rasmussen and Øyvind Ihlen

Abstract

The literature on social media use in risk and crisis communication is growing fast, and it is time to take stock before looking forward. A review of 200 empirical studies in the area shows how the literature is indeed increasing and focusing on particular social media platforms, users, and phases from risk to crisis relief. However, although spanning 40 countries, a large proportion of the world’s social media users are under-represented in the research. In addition, little attention is given to the question of who is actually reached through social media, and the effects of the digital divide are rarely discussed. This article suggests that more attention is given to the questions of equal access to information and ICTs, complementary media channels, and cultural diversity.

Open access

Zafiropoulou Maria and Papachristopoulos Konstantinos

Abstract

The use of new communications technologies and social media, in Greece, during the time of crisis, has led to the development of numerous online informal Civil Society Networks (CSNs) (i.e. networking-building platforms, self - organized groups in Facebook, forums, exchange platforms) proposing a rethinking of the status quo of formal civil organizations. This research, utilizing the methodology of discourse analysis, aims at summarizing the rise of these networks in Greece that incorporates both solidarity initiatives and autonomous political/economic spaces and identify the indicative predictive factors of their survival and growth. Some basic conclusions that have been drawn through this research is that alternative online networks can be proven as indicative sign of the social dynamism of a given period but in order to be resilient and sustainable they should develop focal points of physical reference, pursue national representation, focus mainly on monothematic goods/services and cultivate, in several cases, links with relevant social movements and local or national NGOs. A general induction through this research is that a CSN, during this current crisis, stands between two classical models of reference in a society seeking modernity and flexibility and can be considered as a proposed type of effective experimentation and mobilization that can pursue common social goals and serve needs of deprived people. Some issues that still remain underexplored and need further elaboration are social and political identity of participants, the potential links with local, national and international communities, the functional balance between structure and flexibility as well as the efficient distribution of energy between solidarity and protest.