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Programming of Urban Revitalization

Abstract

The planning stage of the investment–construction process is of a crucial importance. Its overall impact on the costs, construction time and the quality of design solutions is huge. However, in practice, little attention is given to this pre-design stage, except for public buildings or other buildings of particular importance. In consequence, the results of investment and construction activities are unsatisfactory. Therefore, the issue has been given careful consideration in this paper.

The paper discusses the issue of programming urban revitalization, emphasizing its socio-economic importance. To illustrate the complexity of revitalization projects planning, the author draws attention to social, economic, technical and organisational factors, such as public participation, reorganization and revaluation of land use planning, rationalization of energy use, organization and management of revitalization processes, as well as technical progress. Summarising the paper, the author concludes that in order to improve the quality of life of town residents and to protect material national heritage, it is indispensable to continuously revitalize subsequent town areas.

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Revitalised geotourism mining heritage potentials in the Posavje Folds

Abstract

The territory of the Posavje Folds offers many geotourism potentials reflecting in particular in rich mining heritage. For a long time, local communities have considered them mainly in the context of local problems, but nowadays we may see individual examples of successful revitalization of cave chambers and mining structures. All that has given rise to fantastic stories about the mining wealth of the underground world and the mining heritage interpreted with modern approaches and new findings. In addition to managers and heritage owners, the revitalization process also includes scientists, artists, architects and educators who, each in their own way, contribute to a holistic perspective of the values of the past in light of contemporary understanding of this type of heritage. As a result, the territory has witnessed the revitalization of the medieval lead and silver mine Padež pri Laškem, the former Laško coal mine machine room, which was transformed into the Strojnica Gallery, and the polymineral mine Sitarjevec within the last five years. All mentioned examples are cases of abandoned mining activities with long-lasting mining tradition, which left an imprint in the area in terms of the diverse social structure of the population and in terms of town development, which also allows us to evaluate from a distance the contribution to the construction of the railway between Vienna and Trieste, which put these towns on the European map of centres of industrial significance in the mid-19th century. Trains that still connect the Austrian capital with the Adriatic coast may in future, in light of sustainable green tourism, attract curious guests to stop and linger a while, which is the ultimate goal of the attempts of local communities to revitalise mining heritage. Meanwhile, the goals set can only be realised with the help of new and attractive tourist products that reflect own creativity related with tradition ranging from design ideas, music events, art installations, popular science evenings; in short, with contents that are suited to visitors of all ages.

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Specifics of Formal and Legal Issues in Processes of Revitalizing Post-Industrial Buildings

Abstract

The article deals with issues from the initial phase of the investment process connected with revitalizing postindustrial buildings: planning and programming investments in the functional and financial scope, as well as designing. The described formal and legal aspects are the result of a study of a few projects concerning the adaptation of buildings to serving a new function in Zielona Góra and Żaganie. The conclusions drawn from an individual view into each of the described problems are no different than when designing new buildings. It is not until we look into the whole preparation and design process, and gathering all experiences from the formal-legal sphere, that allows us to notice that, in the case of revitalizing postindustrial buildings and their adaptation to serve modern-day functions, a multifaceted but also specific approach is required.

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The Mexican ‘Pueblos Mágicos’. A Qualitative Research Using Ethnological Methodology

ABSTRACT

The main focus of this study is on the ‘magical villages‘ in Mexico. The magical villages were originally established based on a political project with the aim to increase travel and tourism and revitalise the culture. In the introduction, the author describes the type, function and goals of this project based on the official requirements set by its originators. Firstly, the author explains the aims and methods of the intended research supported with theoretical hypothesis to analyse the project as a whole. Secondly, the author defines the methodology used to describe locations of the researched topic. In conclusion, the author provides own hypothesis and expected outcomes of the research.

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Military Brownfields in the Czech Republic and the Potential for their Revitalisation, Focused on their Residential Function

Abstract

One of the basic transformation processes of the period since 1989 has been that of demilitarisation. Among other things, one of its consequences is the emergence of abandoned military buildings and areas - so-called military brownfields. These kinds of brownfields have a large number of specific features to which their subsequent revitalisation must necessarily be adapted. Since a large number of these areas are situated within municipalities or are directly adjacent to them, it is essential for their revitalisation to be approached with great sensitivity. This contribution deals with chosen examples of Czech revitalised post-military areas with a special view to their residential function, which is presently their dominant functional use.

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A historical survey of the Corunca Castle, Romania, based on the military survey maps and present-day measurements

Abstract

Corunca is situated at 4.5 km SE from Târgu-Mureș, near the Salt Stream, the Bozeni Stream, and the Vațman Stream. Its area is inhabited from ancient times. Both prehistoric and Roman findings were reported to have been found within the village boundaries. Its neighbouring medieval village, Sárvári, perished in the 16th century, while Kisernye was devastated by Turkish troops in 1661. The settlement was first recorded in 1332 as Korunka. The Reformed Church was built between 1769 and 1778, while its spire dates from 1793. The earlier church was surrended by high protective walls, which were demolished in 1769.

The extremely ruinous castle with its neoclassical façade and a couple of neighbouring farm buildings appear on the left side of the European route E60 travelling from Târgu-Mureș to Sighișoara. Today, this is a barren place, although once it was surrounded by a grove the size of 120 cadastral acres [2].

During the reign of John Sigismund Zápolya, Prince of Transylvania and ruler of a part of the Kingdom of Hungary, the village belonged to Thomas Mihályfy. The castle was ravaged in 1562 by the revolted Szeklers. After the fall of the Mihályfy family, the Chancellor of Transylvania, Farkas Kovacsóczi owned the estate, which later came down to the Tholdalagi family. The Tholdalagi family belongs to one of the great magnate families of Transylvania, with nicknames deriving from Ercea and Iclod, but originating from Toldal, Mureș County, Romania – their ancient demesne from the 16th century. Mihály I. Tholdalagi (1580–1673), one of the wisest diplomats in the Principality, reshaped the original building to an impressive castle in the 1630s, whose size and adjoining buildings are described in the Inventory dating from 1680. The first members of the Tholdalagi family came to Transylvania from Hungary. According to the family traditions, and also mentioned in their Certificate of Count, their ancestor is the extinguished Alaghi family member, András, who obtained Toldalag settlement together with its neighbouring Ercse in 1453; hence the nickname “Ercsei”. Thus, Mihály Tholdalagi’s parents were Balázs from Gáldtő and Borbála Bessenyei [1].

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Modernization of Urban Space with Greenery / Modernizacja Przestrzeni Miejskiej Zielenią

Abstract

Modernization of urban space with greenery is part of a process of revitalization and restoration of building, which today are an important part of the design and realizations activities in the world. Adaptation of urban space to modern needs, often associated with the change of the original function is necessary to improve the quality of this space: utility, technical and aesthetic. Urbanization of the world combined with the destruction of the environment. It is necessary to return to nature in the context of the urban environment. Greater use of green, eco ideas of architecture and sustainable development becomes the norm. The paper presents some aspects of selected projects and activities in the countryside as a method of upgrading urban space.

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Revitalizing urban revitalization in Poland: Towards a new agenda for research and practice

Abstract

As a starting point, this paper recognizes the key role of the notion of ‘revitalization’ in the development of the multi-sectoral approach to urban renewal in Poland over the last 15 years. Thus, while acknowledging the important limitations of revitalization programs to date, it aims not so much to reject or criticize the current model revitalization, but rather to ‘revitalize’ the notion of revitalization itself. Based both on interviews with engaged practitioners of revitalization in Poland and on a review of practices existing elsewhere, this paper seeks to infuse the Polish imaginary of revitalization with transformative policy agendas.

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People, Place and Partnership: Exploring Strategies to Revitalise Town Centres

Abstract

More and more town centres in Western Europe are in decline, as indicated by growing shop vacancy rates in shopping streets. To turn the tide, decision makers look for revitalisation strategies. Are there any solutions? Making use of theoretical insights, empirical findings and anecdotal evidence from the Netherlands, we suggest that town centre revitalisation is a matter of connecting people, place and partnership. First, strategies should be based on an understanding of how customers (people) behave. Secondly, redesign of the physical environment (place) might be needed, since visitors prefer compact centres that are built on a human scale and known for a unique profile. Finally, close collaboration between a wide range of local stakeholders (partnership) is essential. We conclude that town centre revitalisation is possible, but takes a lot of energy and patience from the actors involved.

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Revitalisation of spoil tips and socio-economic polarisation – a case study of Ruhr area (Germany)

Abstract

The paper discusses issues about the revitalisation of spoil tips, socio-economic polarisation and social exclusion in the field of municipal recreational activities based on an example of the largest post-industrial region in Europe – the Ruhr area in Germany. Revitalisation of brownfield areas very often leads to the creation of leisure facilities of various types (with a range of entrance fees) and because of this it may mitigate, or exacerbate, the severity of these negative phenomena. In the Ruhr area there are 104 spoil tips of different origins (mine tips, slag heaps, rubbish dumps), sizes and shapes (from conical heaps, through table mountains shaped tips and intentionally shaped for landscape tips, to major tips) and state of preservation. The research has shown that it is possible to use the majority of these spoil tips in the Ruhr area (87 of them) as leisure facilities as they have been changed into green areas, parks, playgrounds, locations for sports activities and tourist attractions after their restoration. Furthermore, they are mostly accessible free of charge and may serve a wide range of people – from locals to visitors, from children to senior citizens etc., regardless of their income. As such they may mitigate the socio-economic polarisation tendencies in the region.

Open access