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Yusriadi, Haedar Akib and Andi Ihsan

Abstract

This study aimed at identifying the implementation of bureaucratic reforms and trying to offer some solutions for improvement of administrative services licensing. This study applied qualitative approach using a case study design. Techniques of data collection used three kinds of instrument, namely: observation, in-depth interviews, and office documentation. The data were analyzed through the stages of data reduction, data presentation, and conclusions and verification. The results found that the implementation of the bureaucratic reform of administration service licensing on the Institutional aspects in Bone regency have shaped the One Stop-Integrated Service; on the aspects of human resources found that the qualification of existing employees were not appropriate to the needs of the organization which lack of employees’ disciplines and responsibilities; on the aspects of systems and procedures indicated that the licensing generally resolved exceeds the specified time of period as well as discrimination and inconsistencies. Through this study, the researcher made verification in some of the concepts and theories in the form of formalism as one of the characteristics of prismatic society proposed by Fred W. Riggs in those phenomena which called “Heresy Regulation”.

Open access

Remigijus Civinskas

Can a Senior Civil Servant Adapt to Managing by Contract? Reform and Civil Servants' Preferences in Lithuanian Government

This article seeks to explain the attitudes of civil servants to the preparation of redesigning the civil service system. The starting point for this study is the perplexing point that the plans to reform the Lithuanian civil service system, which was designed to enhance the influence and role of top managers, resulted in the civil servants themselves as the plan's most conspicuous opponents. The article provides explanations to this puzzling situation, drawing on contractualization as the radical reform model or public management model. An attempt is made to find some support for performance contracts, as well as the objectives of rotation implementation and the creation of a higher civil service system. The article argues that civil servants may regard contracts and other managerial elements as a way of realizing other objectives in the reform that they value.

Open access

Gregor Virant and Iztok Rakar

Abstract

A major reform of the public sector salary system took place between 2003 and 2008, where public administration was included as one of the sub-sectors in a broader scheme, covering also the health care and social care sectors, the education sector and other parts of the public sector. The reform was extremely complex, and its development consisted of several phases. The reform resulted in a completely new salary system for the public sector. There are several tangible benefits of the reform; however, there are deficiencies, too, and some of them were amplified by measures inspired by the financial crisis. In our opinion, the changes should be focused on eliminating or drastically reducing de facto automatic promotion to higher salary grades, introducing more flexibility into the system without putting at risk its coherence and ensuring the budget for variable (performance-related) pay. Additionally, but with due caution, the option should also be considered and discussed to enable the government to classify certain positions in salary ranks higher than defined in the collective agreement, as a response to the situation on the labour market.

Open access

David Špaček

Abstract

The chapter summarizes and discusses the main topics, developments and issues of Czech administrative reform, based on desk research, secondary literature on developments of administrative reform in the country and input obtained through mapping and analyzing ESF / ESIF support and interviews with employees of central bodies that are responsible for the coordination and evaluation of the use of ESF / ESIF support. It is based on findings prepared within the project European Public Administration Country Knowledge (EUPACK) that focused on researching dynamics of public administration in EU member states and the contribution of external support to improving public administration quality. The research indicates that partial results have been accomplished particularly in the following areas: openness and transparency, quality management implementation (by municipalities and regions) and e-government. Civil-service legislation has been consolidated rather recently, yet has changed various times, and this undermines every effort to evaluate its effects. A national PA evaluation system is being developed by the Ministry of the Interior but focuses (similarly to PA strategies and related operational programmes) on input indicators. This raises questions about possibilities to evaluate actual quality in PA and results of projects implemented within PA reforms.

Open access

Remigijus Civinskas and Mindaugas Kaselis

Institutional Contexts of the Implementation of Quality Initiatives in the Public Sectors of Finland and Lithuania

This article reports the results of research of public service quality reform initiatives in Lithuania and Finland. Research reveals that quality management has been in vogue within the manufacturing sectors of both countries for several decades. The service industries have made heavy investments in this area. There are also major initiatives from the public sector to improve quality. This paper examines and compares the development of reform conceptions and programmes in terms of institutional interest and power positions. It demonstrates that the initiation and progress of reform initiatives were determined by particular unforeseen and accidental circumstances in both countries. On the other hand, it explains why Finnish institutions were ready for a constructive dialogue, and a pilot try-outs option in implementation or reform instruments. Lithuanian institutions, by comparison, are characterized by the creation of new structures and self-seeking interests. Finally, the paper reveals how the instruments of public service quality improvement were implemented in both countries.

Open access

Muiris MacCarthaigh

Abstract

Following the Irish general election of 2011, a new ministry emerged which sought to combine public expenditure, industrial relations and public sector reform. The creation of the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform (DPER) represented a major departure in Irish administrative history, not least because it introduced a new actor at the heart of Irish government, but also for the range of tasks with which it was endowed. This article provides an administrative reform context for the creation of DPER before examining its work across three domains: industrial relations, financial management reform and administrative reform. Drawing on Kingdon’s ‘multiple streams’ model of policy change, the article argues that reform efforts across all three were made possible by the ‘window of opportunity’ presented by the department’s creation and the coming together of problems, policies and politics in respect of public service reform.

Open access

Lenka Matějová, Juraj Nemec, Milan Křápek and Daniel Klimovský

Abstract

Many countries have carried out extensive amalgamation-related territorial reforms at the level of local self-government and created relatively large municipalities. The Czech Republic is one of the few remaining European countries with a fragmented territorial structure. There is a lot of discussion in the country about the need for amalgamation, but this discussion is mainly based on political arguments rather than on empirical evidence about the feasibility of amalgamation and its potential to improve local government performance. This paper analyses economies of scale on the local level as a factor that should be reflected in debates about the pros and cons of amalgamation in the Czech Republic. To add to the existing knowledge about the reality of economies of scale on the municipal level in the Czech Republic, we processed the municipal costs of three selected areas on a representative sample of municipalities in the South Moravian Region. The analysis showed that economies of scale can be identified for collecting local fees and for pre-school and elementary education, but not for local administration. Our results suggest that the existence of too small municipalities in the Czech Republic results in inefficiencies and should be addressed.