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Open access

William Pavot

Abstract

Research interest in topics such as happiness, the quality of life, and the experience of well-being has dramatically increased in the past four decades. Global measures of Subjective Well-Being (SWB) have long held a prominent position in this burgeoning body of research (Diener, 1984; Pavot, 2008). Despite their widespread acceptance and use, the validity and utility of global measures of SWB have been challenged at several levels of analysis. These critiques have ranged from the conceptual basis of SWB (e.g. Ryan & Deci 2001; Ryff, 1989; Ryff & Singer, 2008) to very specific concerns about the context of the assessment situation and the cognitive processes involved in formulating a response to such measures (Pavot & Diener, 1993a; Schimmack & Oishi, 2005; Schwarz, & Strack, 1999). The purpose of this paper is to review and address some of the more prominent critiques of global measures of SWB, and to discuss methodological procedures and strategies for minimizing threats to the validity and increasing the utility of global measures of SWB.

Open access

Romualdas Malinauskas and Vilija Malinauskiene

Abstract

This study aimed to examine the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and psychological wellbeing in a three-month follow-up study of male athletes. In addition, we examined the mediating role of perceived social support and perceived stress on the relationship between EI and psychological wellbeing. The sample included 398 male athletes who completed measures of emotional intelligence (Schutte Self-Report Inventory), psychological wellbeing (Ryff Psychological Wellbeing Scale; SSRI), perceived social support (Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support), and perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale–10). Results from structural equation modelling procedures identified that perceived social support and perceived stress partially mediated the association between EI and psychological wellbeing. The sequential mediation effects of perceived social support–perceived stress on the relations between EI and wellbeing were confirmed. Finally, limitations and recommendations for future research were considered

Open access

S. Roslan, N. Ahmad, N. Nabilla and Z. Ghiami

Abstract

This study attempted to determine the level of psychological well-being among postgraduate students. The study also aimed to assess the relationship between psychological well-being and demographic factors, such as age and field of study. Psychological well-being questionnaires were administered to a sample of 192 Master of Education students. The findings demonstrated that Master of Education students possessed a slightly high level of psychological well-being. Differences were found in students’ psychological well-being across age groups, F (4, 167) = 3.178, p = 0.01, and field of study, F (8, 163) = 2.668, p = 0.01, respectively. According to the results, students in the age group of 41 years and above possessed the highest level of psychological well-being (M = 5, SD = 0.71).

Open access

Domingo García-Villamisar and Araceli Del Pozo Armentia

Abstract

An emerging literature has begun to document the emotional consequences of everyday executive functions on emotional distress. Little is known, however, about whether this relation is mediated by other variables.

A multiple mediation model was proposed to integrate core concepts of daily executive dysfunctions with emotional distress in order to increase understanding of their relationship to psychological well-being and emotional regulation. The working hypothesis was that dimensions of well-being and emotional regulation may be a suitable mediator. It was hypothesized that dimensions of well-being and emotional regulation are a possible mediator between the executive dysfunctions and psychological distress. Participants were 122 undergraduate students from university courses in General Education and Social Education at, the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, with a mean age of 21.76. Results indicate that several dimensions of psychological well-being and emotional reappraisal strategies mediate the relationships between daily executive dysfunctions and psychological distress. Implications of these data are discussed.

Open access

Jowita Wycisk

Abstract

Previous research on LGB parenting is dominated by comparing the LGB families to traditional families with heterosexual parents. Little is known about personal experiences of LGB parents and psychological consequences of nonheterosexual parenting in a heteronormative environment.

This article presents the conceptualization of lesbian, gay and bisexual parents’ minority stress and focuses especially on it’s sources. LGB parents are considered as a multiple excluded minority group. Using a theoretical framework of minority stress (Meyer 1995) the main stressors are described with reference to parental situation: discrimination and violence, perceived stigma, self-concealment and internalized homophobia. These factors’ possible impact on psychological wellbeing is discussed on the basis of research available. The Polish sociocultural context and its potential influence of LGB parents’ stress is also described.

The specificity of LGB parents’ minority stress is that it challenges the aspect of identity associated with a parental social role. The most common stressors undermine the status and quality of parent-child bond and involves the child himself/ herself. In conclusion, minority stress of LGB parents is recognized as a risk factor for decrease in mental health, but also as an opportunity for personal development based on the stress - related growth.

Open access

Vislava Globevnik Velikonja, Tina Lozej, Gaja Leban, Ivan Verdenik and Eda Vrtačnik Bokal

Abstract

Objective

The aim was to determine whether pregnant women conceiving through in vitro fertilization (IVF) differ from those conceiving spontaneously in terms of psychological well-being and the quality of life.

Methods

In a prospective study we included 75 women conceived after IVF and 78 who conceived spontaneously in the same time period (control group). All the women were sent a self-report questionnaire about demographic and reproductive history, health, pregnancy concerns, containing Subjective Quality of Life Scale (QLS), Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), the Psychological Well-Being Scale (PWB), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Zung Self-Assessment Anxiety Scale (SAS); obstetric and newborn’s data were obtained from medical records. Response rate was 66.6% in the IVF and 83.3% in control group.

Results

The mean women’s age was 33.8 years in the IVF, and 32.5 years in the control group (NS). There were no significant differences between groups on the most of the outcome measures assessing psychological status. IVF mothers were just less satisfied in “friend/acquaintances” (P=0.03), a higher percentage had sexual problems prior to conception (P=0.03); the length of hospitalization during pregnancy was longer (P=0.02), and the preterm delivery rate was higher (P=0.01). Withingroup changes over gestation time indicated that IVF women, not controls, showed an increase in positive affect (P=0.04) and purpose in life (P=0.05).

Conclusions

IVF women are inclined to social isolation. Despite more medical problems during pregnancy, they reported improved positive emotions and purpose in life as the pregnancy progressed.