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Open access

László Balázs

Abstract

The data necessary for the empirical research presented it this study were provided by 572 people, from altogether 26 schools. The schools included 18 primary schools, 7 secondary training institutions and 1 primary and secondary school. The major question of the study related to the pedagogues' emotional intelligence, more precisely if the teachers of different institutions showed any individual differences in their emotional intelligence patterns according to the given type of their school's organisational culture. We also examined if the nature of the organizational culture had any influence on the development the individual's emotional intelligence pattern. On the basis of the results we can declare that the teachers of different institutions having their own particular organizational cultures evolve different emotional intelligence patterns. Accordingly, we can come to the conclusion that in the long term the organizational culture affects the evolution of the individual's emotional intelligence pattern and vice versa.

Open access

Katarzyna Rutkowska and Dariusz Gierczuk

Abstract

Introduction. Wrestling is a sport that requires proper physical and mental preparation. The authors present selected psychological resources, emotional intelligence and creative attitude, as factors influencing the broadly defined mastery, both in the area of sport and out of it. These variables guarantee better adaptation to changing conditions and they are also connected with the effectiveness of handling different situations and optimal problem solving. The aim of the study was to diagnose emotional intelligence and creative attitude among young female and male wrestlers. Material and methods. The study included 20 females from the regional team of cadets and juniors and 19 male wrestlers from the sports school. The control group consisted of two deliberately selected groups of untrained students - 20 girls and 19 boys. KANH and INTE questionnaires were used in the study. Results. In the three groups under investigation medium levels of emotional intelligence and creative vs. reproductive attitude were observed. It was only female wrestlers who manifested low levels of emotional intelligence which, similar to the levels of nonconformity, heuristic thinking and creative attitude, were lower than in female students from the control group. The female wrestlers demonstrated higher levels of conformity and reproductive attitude. Female students demonstrated higher levels of emotional intelligence and conformity than male students. No differences between male and female wrestlers were observed. Conclusions. The findings show that it is necessary to conduct longitudinal research on athletes and untrained individuals. Bearing in mind that learning a motoric task depends, inter alia, on intellectual and emotional factors, the authors also recommend another course of research, i.e. the verification of how these variables are related to the effectiveness of learning motoric tasks. The authors' own research results as well as further (planned) investigations will make it possible to profile various educational effects and deliberately strengthen the potential of young wrestlers.

Open access

Nada Pop-Jordanova and Emilija Stoimenova-Canevska

Abstract

The aim of this study is to figure out possible connectedness between emotional intelligence and five big personality factors in female students selected from social sciences faculties.

The evaluated sample comprised 66 healthy students, of Macedonian nationality, mean age 18.9 ± 0.63 years. As psychometric instruments, we used the EI-test and NEO-PI-R, both with eligible metric characteristic and already used in the Republic of Macedonia. Statistical analysis was performed using Sta17, both descriptive and inferential statistics including medians, standard deviations, and two-tailed Pearson's correlation.

The obtained results for emotional intelligence showedn average anxiety level (M = 77.35), extraversion (M = 50.91) and a realistic outlook on life (M = 81.64), high self-confidence (M = 44.44) and generally satisfactory empathy (M = 85.39). Personality characteristics obtained with NEO-PI-R showed high extroversion (M = 123. 70), low agreeableness (M = 105.82) and consciousness (M = 104.67), as well as mild neuroticism (M = 91.33) and openness (M = 117.45). The results confirmed a high positive correlation between anxiety, optimism, and empathy; and between self-confidence and empathy within the EI test. Within NEO-PR-R there was a positive correlation between factors Extroversion and Openness to Experience and a negative correlation between the factors Extroversion and Agreeableness. However, just one negative correlation is noted, between Extroversion from EI and Openness to experience from NEO-PR-R (-0,25; p < 0.05).

We concluded that similar facets measured with different psychometric instruments have different basic concepts. The obtained results, although they figure out some support from other research, also differ from other studies. It is important for us to follow the obtained results and to provoke further research on a bigger and more diverse sample.

Open access

Anna Baczyńska

Abstract

Purpose: The research objective was to examine to what extent line manager competencies are linked to intelligence, and more specifically, three types of intelligence: analytical (fluid), practical and emotional.

Methodology: The research was carried out with line managers (N=98) who took part in 12 Assessment Centre sessions and completed tests measuring analytical, practical and emotional intelligence. The adopted hypotheses were tested using a multiple regression. In the regression model, the dependent variable was a managerial competency (management and striving for results, social skills, openness to change, problem solving, employee development) and the explanatory variables were the three types of intelligence. Five models, each for a separate management competency, were tested in this way.

Findings: In the study, it was hypothesized that practical intelligence relates to procedural tacit knowledge and is the strongest indicator of managerial competency. Analysis of the study results testing this hypothesis indicated that practical intelligence largely accounts for the level of competency used in managerial work (from 21% to 38%). The study findings suggest that practical intelligence is a better indicator of managerial competencies among line managers than traditionally measured IQ or emotional intelligence.

Originality: This research fills an important gap in the literature on the subject, indicating the links between major contemporary selection indicators (i.e., analytical, practical and emotional intelligence) and managerial competencies presented in realistic work simulations measured using the Assessment Centre process.

Open access

Dorota Szczygieł and Łukasz Baka

Abstract

Our study was designed to examine an individuals’ affective traits (i.e., dispositional affectivity and emotional intelligence) and job stressors (i.e., interpersonal conflicts, quantitative workload and organizational constraints) on emotional exhaustion. One hundred and fifty-three employees participated in our study. All of them worked in teams and their job required face-to-face contacts with clients. Our main hypothesis was that emotional intelligence acts as a moderator in the relationship between job stressors and emotional exhaustion. The results indicate that employees who report more interpersonal conflicts at work, greater quantitative workloads and greater organizational constraints also report more symptoms of emotional exhaustion. Moreover, the results show that all three stressors were significant as predictors of emotional exhaustion beyond the employee’s dispositional affectivity. The moderating effect of emotional intelligence was observed in the relationship between interpersonal conflicts at work and emotional exhaustion. The relationship between interpersonal conflicts and emotional exhaustion was observed only among employees who were low in emotional intelligence. In contrast, interpersonal conflicts and emotional exhaustion were unrelated among employees who were high in emotional intelligence. The results are discussed from the Job Demands–Resources model perspective.

Open access

Albulena Metaj-Macula

Abstract

The studty aims at examining and understanding the relation between Emotional Intelligence and Perceived social support in a sample of 525 students of the University of Prishtina. Great number of studies in the field of Emotional Intelligence, have shown that that this new construct of Intelligence, (EI), operates within the social context, therefore the examination of socially relevant variables is crucial for personal and social context. It has been hypothesised that Emotional Intelligence and it’s dimensions correlate positively with the Perceived Social Support and the relation between these two variables is a great predictor of positive interactions, interpersonal relationships and is very relevant for the educational context as well. The study is based on the ability and competency based model of the Emotional Intelligence construct. Emotional Intelligence Scale (Schutte, N. S., Malouff, J. M., Hall, L. E., Haggerty, D. J., Cooper, J. T., Golden, C. J., & Dornheim, L. (1998) and the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (Zimet, Dahlem, Zimet & Farely, 1998) were administered to gather data in order to test the hypotheisis. The preliminary findings support theoretical and empirical perspective, and appear to be promising by emphasizing the Emotional Intelligence consutruct as an added value for the educational context, in specific for youth interactions and their wellbeing.

Open access

Ľudmila Majerníková and Andrea Obročníková

Abstract

Aim. The theory of emotional intelligence provides a framework to think about all of the non-technical skills you need in order to be a good nurse. It’s often described as the potential to feel, use, communicate, recognize, remember, describe, identify, learn from, manage, understand, and explain emotions. The aim of the study was to determine the level of total global Emotional Intelligence among undergraduate students of nursing and also to check the influence of factors (the year of study, type of completed high school education) on Emotional Intelligence.

Methods. The study involved together 86 university students of nursing (average age 21.7±1.4; 96.5% females). We used the standardized questionnaire Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire – Short Form (TEIQue-SF).

Results. The results show a higher level scores achieved by nursing students in all areas EI except Self-control compared to a population norm. Students who have completed non-health’s education achieved higher level scores of Emotionality (p ≤ 0.05).

Conclusions. EI abilities are essential for the profession of nursing in both educational and clinical practice. Examination of the role of education and the development of EI abilities in student nurses are needed to support this foundation of EI research.

Open access

Katarzyna Rutkowska and Dariusz Gierczuk

Emotional Intelligence and the Sense of Efficiency of Coaching and Instructing in Wrestling

Introduction. The aim of this study was to diagnose the level of emotional intelligence and sense of efficiency among the occupational group of coaches and instructors in wrestling. Material and methods. The study involved 27 participants of a training course for coaches and instructors in training (25 men and 2 women). The basic methods of research involved the Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire INTE and the GSES scale for measurement of the sense of efficacy. Their use allowed us to diagnose the average level of emotional intelligence and the sense of self-efficacy. Results. Coaches and instructors are characterised by average level of emotional intelligence and the sense of self-efficacy. First class coaches are characterized by significantly higher levels of emotional intelligence, and the belonging to the group of trainers has no influence on the sense of efficacy. Conclusions. The results of the study can provide guidance to create/modify training programs for sports coaches. Developing mental toughness and improving emotional intelligence should occupy a special place in the training process wrestlers.

Open access

Michał Bajerski

Abstract

Due to the growing interest not only in theoretical approaches to irony, but also in its pragmatic functions, the number of questions is increasing. One of them is: Is irony in any way connected to emotional intelligence? This paper outlines what irony is and how it is used in everyday conversations. Analysis of current studies in emotional intelligence highlights its influence over behavior and attitude. It led to an experiment where subjects (N = 80) where asked to fill an emotional intelligence questionnaire and an irony questionnaire. The results show that emotional intelligence is negatively correlated with the overall sum of ironic sentences and self-ironic sentences, and with the number of ironic praise sentences. Later, the implications of empirical findings are discussed.

Open access

Katarzyna A. Knopp

Abstract

This study investigates the relationship between EI and the state of mental health of unemployed persons. Gender differences were also identified in terms of mental health and its correlation with EI. A sample of 160 Polish unemployed persons aged 35 to 45 years filled in self-descriptive measures of EI and mental health. Significant gender differences were found - unemployed women were characterised by a greater intensity of mental health disorders than unemployed men. EI was negatively correlated with mental health disorders, but the correlations were few and weaker than expected. However, when unemployed persons with a low, average and high EI were compared, it turned out that participants with a low EI were characterised by a significantly worse condition of mental health than participants with a average or high EI.