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Open access

Jarosław Popiel and Agnieszka Cekiera

Abstract

The aim of the study was to estimate the usefulness of measuring the thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAbs) concentration in dogs’ serum in order to assess thyroid functioning. The study was performed on 383 dogs. The animals were divided into two groups: group A (n = 308) consisted of dogs with hypothyroidism and group B (n = 75) consisted of dogs with euthyreosis. TgAbs was determined in both groups. The reaction to the TgAbs in group A was strongly positive in 32% of dogs, weakly positive in 33% of dogs, and negative in 35% of dogs. The TgAbs were observed in 32% of the dogs from group B, in which 8% of the animals had strongly positive reaction (++) and 24% - slightly positive (+). The correlation between the concentration of total and free fraction of the thyroxin and the level of the TgAbs were observed in group A. The tendency to positive reaction to the antibodies (++) in dogs with lower concentrations of total thyroxine and free thyroxine was observed. It was noted that the presence of the TgAbs was common in dogs with hypothyroidism. However, it could be also found in the animals with euthyreosis.

Open access

P. Sobiech, R. Targoński, A. Stopyra and K. Żarczyńska

Changes in the blood coagulation profile after ovariohysterectomy in female dogs

This study investigated changes in the coagulation profile of 10 healthy female dogs subjected to ovariohysterectomy. Blood samples were collected three times - before, directly after and 24 h after surgery. Plasma samples were analyzed to determine thrombin time (TT), prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen content, D-dimer content and antithrombin (AT) III activity. The results revealed post-operative haemostatic system disorders related to prolonged APTT, higher fibrinogen and D-dimer concentrations and lower levels of AT III activity.

Open access

H. Matyjasik, Z. Adamiak, W. Pesta and Y. Zhalniarovich

Laparoscopic procedures in dogs and cats

Laparoscopic procedures are gaining wider application in veterinary medicine. The fnollowing article contains description of indispensable equipment for performing surgical procedures with use of laparoscopic technique and reviews some laparoscopic procedures which found application in veterinary medicine.

Open access

A. Rychlik, M. Nowicki, M. Kander and M. Szweda

Abstract

The present experiment evaluated the quality of macroscopic images and the mean time of capsule passage through different sections of the gastrointestinal tract in dogs subjected to different preparation protocols before capsule endoscopy. In the first examination, the colonoscopy preparation protocol was applied, and in the second examination, the animals were administered macrogol. The study revealed that macrogol administration before capsule endoscopy significantly improved the quality of macroscopic images. The colonoscopy preparation protocol may not support accurate visualization of the large bowel mucosa and, in selected patients, also the small bowel mucosa. Macrogol administration had no effect on capsule transit time through the alimentary canal. Capsules used in endoscopic evaluations of the small bowel in humans may have limited applications in macroscopic examinations of large bowel mucosa in dogs.

Open access

M. Zając, M. Szczepanik, P. Wilkołek, Ł. Adamek and Z. Pomorski

Abstract

Atopic dermatitis is a common allergic skin disease in dogs. Monitoring the progress of treatment and the assessment of the severity of disease symptoms are crucial elements of the treatment procedure. One of the common means of assessing the severity of the clinical signs of the disease is the CADESI 03. Research studies have pointed to a possibility of assessing the severity of skin lesions by means of measuring biophysical skin parameters such as TEWL, skin hydration and erythema intensity. The aim of the study was the assessment of changes in TEWL and CADESI values measured in ten different body regions during non-specific anti-pruritus treatment. The examination was performed on ten dogs with atopic dermatitis (age from 2.5 years to 7 years, mean age 3.8 years). The measurements were performed in the following body regions: the lumbar region, the right axillary fossa, the right inguinal region, the ventral abdominal region, the right lateral thorax region, the internal surface of the auricle, interdigital region of the right forelimb, cheek, bridge of nose and the lateral site of antebrachum. A statistically significant decrease in CADESI values was reported starting from the second week of treatment. In the case of the mean TEWL values, a fall was observed after one week of treatment in the ventral abdominal region and the interdigital region, after two weeks of treatment in the axillary fossa and the inguinal region, and after three weeks in the cheek and the lateral thorax region. There was no statistically significant decrease in TEWL values in the course of treatment in four other regions.

Open access

P. Holak, H. Matyjasik, M. Jałyński, Z. Adamiak and M. Jaskólska

Abstract

This article describes clinical experiments involving laparoscopic pyloromyotomy and pyloroplasty in six dogs diagnosed with hypertrophy of the pyloric sphincter. Laparoscopic pyloromyotomy was performed in three dogs, and pyloroplasty was carried out in the remaining three animals. The patients were operated on based on the authors’ previous experiences with experimental pyloromyotomy and pyloroplasty in pigs. Pyloromyotomy and pyloroplasty resulted in full recovery and complete subsidence of symptoms in all patients.

Open access

Rafi Rabecca Tono, Olufemi Oladayo Faleke, Alhaji Magaji, Musbaudeen Olayinka Alayande, Akinyemi Olaposi Fajinmi and Emmanuel Busayo Ibitoye

Abstract

The aim of this research is to study the presence and prevalence of trypanosome species in local dogs between January and July, 2010 in the Zuru area of Kebbi State, Nigeria.Standard trypanosome detection methods comprising of wet blood films, thin films and microhaematocrit centrifugation technique were used to detect trypanosomes; while the degree of anemia was determined through the use of FAMACHA® eye colour chart and packed cell volume values. A total of 567 dogs were enumerated in fourteen locations within the study area out of which 192 (33.7%) were randomly examined and 4 (2.08%) were positive for the presence of trypanosomes. All positive samples morphologically belong to the Trypanosoma brucei group. The obtained PCV values showed that 50 (26.04%) dogs were anemic, while the FAMACHA® detected anemia status of varying degrees in 104 (77%) sampled dogs.These findings are significant as this is the first time that the trypanosome infection will be reported in dogs from the study area. This study establishes the presence of Trypanosoma brucei group in the study area, which is of zoonotic and economic importance.

Open access

GALAC Sara

Abstract

Spontaneous hypercortisolism or Cushing's syndrome is a common endocrinopathy in dogs. Pituitary-dependent and adrenal-dependent hypercortisolism each require specific treatment and diagnostic imaging is very helpful in choosing the treatment that is appropriate. The aims and expectations of the treatment need to be established beforehand and discussed with the owner to avoid unexpected disappointments. The clinical signs of pituitary-dependent hypercortisolism caused by a pituitary microadenoma can be managed with the adrenocorticostatic drug trilostane, but the drug will not affect the pituitary tumor. Hypophysectomy is therefore preferred in those dogs that have an enlarged pituitary but are in good clinical condition and have a long life-expectancy. Inoperable pituitary tumors can be treated by radiotherapy. The best treatment in dogs with cortisol-secreting adrenocortical tumors is adrenalectomy. If surgery is not possible, because of vascular invasion or metastatic spread, mitotane is recommended. Treatment with trilostane can be considered but is only palliative: it does not affect the adrenocortical tumor.

Open access

Izabela Kozłowska, Joanna Marć-Pieńkowska and Marek Bednarczyk

Abstract

Inulin is widely used as a prebiotic additive in the nutrition of farm animals and pets. This fructooligosaccharide demonstrates a beneficial effect on host health by stimulating the growth and development of commensal bacterial species inhabiting the large intestine. Used for example in the feeding of piglets, inulin greatly enhances their daily body weight gains and also reduces the risk of anemia (Tako et al., 2008). In poultry, in the case of meat breeds, inulin provides better feed utilization, increases the daily gains and the final carcass weight (Ammerman et al., 1988). In laying hens, it positively stimulates the production of eggs (Chen et al., 2005). The addition of prebiotics in the diet of dogs has a positive effect on the concentration of the end products of sugar and protein fermentation in the colon, thus contributing to the health status and good condition of the animal (Flickinger et al., 2003 b; Middelbos et al., 2007). Moreover, inulin beneficially affects the efficiency of the immune system of the organism (including the anticarcinogenic properties) (Kelly-Quagliana et al., 1998), as well as lipids and the cholesterol metabolism by effectively reducing their concentrations in the blood serum (Grela et al., 2014 a). This paper characterizes inulin as a prebiotic additive in the diet of selected species of monogastric animals. In addition, data about the hypolipidemic and immunostimulatory properties of inulin are presented.

Open access

Dimirtinka Zapryanova, Teodora Mircheva, Tsanko Hristov, Lazarin Lazarov, Aleksander Atanasov, Yoana Petrova and Damyan Lalev

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to analyse the changes in concentrations of total proteins, albumin, globulins and albumin/globulin ratio in dogs with experimentally induced acute inflammation. The study was performed on 9 mongrel dogs (experimental group) and 6 mongrel dogs (control group) at the age of 2 years and body weight 12-15 kg. The acute inflammation was reproduced by inoculation of 2 ml turpentine oil in the lumbar region subcutaneously and in same quantity saline in control dogs. Blood samples were collected into heparinized tubes before inoculation (hour 0) then at hours 6, 24, 48, 72 and on days 7, 14, 21. The statistical analysis of the data was performed using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The level of albumin statistically decreased in the experimental dogs from at 72nd h to day 14 while the concentration of globulins increased from the 72nd h to day 21. On days 7 and 14 the albumin/globulin ratio slightly decreased. During the whole post inoculation period the values of total protein have not changed. The dates of the present study confirm that albumin, albumin/globulin ratio and globulins are sensitive factors in inflammatory conditions in dogs.