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Anders Bo Rasmussen

Abstract

This article provides two examples of the Americanization of Danish journalism through an examination of Danish journalists’ adaptation of New Journalism and investigative journalism as seen through the pages of the Danish Union of Journalists’ periodical Journalisten. The article answers Daniel Hallin and Paolo Mancini’s call for more “concrete” studies of the Americanization process. The study demonstrates how news media in the United States, in the two examples provided, have served as an important source of methodological inspiration for Danish journalists from the late 1960s forward

Open access

The Nordic Journalists of Tomorrow

An Exploration of First Year Journalism Students in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden

Jan Fredrik Hovden, Gunn Bjørnsen, Rune Ottosen, Ida Willig and Henrika Zilliacus-Tikkanen

Abstract

The present article summarizes the findings of a survey among first-year journalism students in Denmark, Finland, Sweden and Norway. The survey covers a wide array of subjects including social recruitment, motivation for studying journalism, preferences regarding future journalistic working life, views on the role of journalism in society, attitudes toward the profession, journalistic ideals and ideas about what are the most important traits for journalists. The study reveals significant differences between journalism students in the Nordic countries. The analysis appears to support a ‘nation type’ interpretation of attitudes among journalists, linked to different national traditions, in explaining the differences found. Our results clearly indicate the importance of traditional sociological explanations of behavior for the understanding of journalistic preferences and ambitions. For example, the choice of preferred topics is strongly gendered and appears as the sexual division of labor sublimated into journalistic preferences.

Open access

Charlotte Wien

Abstract

The article seeks the roots of the journalistic concept of objectivity in various theoretical schools. It argues that the concept of objectivity in journalism originates in the positivistic tradition and, furthermore, that it is strongly related to tan earlier theoretical school within historiography. Journalism has made several attempts have been made by journalism to break free of the positivistic objectivity paradigm, none of them very successful, however. The paper discusses each of these attempts. Finally, using the concept of objectivity as a prism, the paper sketches out what might be termed a landscape of journalism theory.

Open access

Oksana Banias, Iwona Leonowicz-Bukała and Anna Martens

Abstract

This article attempts to assess the role of Twitter in international communication on the basis of intentionally selected part of reality. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the potential impact of messages, posted in the microblogging service by the internationally recognized journalist, on creating the image of Poland in the world. Case study was carried out on the example of Anne Applebaum’s Twitter account.

Open access

Taras Balda

Abstract

This article analyses creation and development of weekly newspaper “Nashe Slovo” (Our Word) and its role in the protection of Ukrainian identity. Also the author analyzes the role of newspaper in strengthening of Ukraine-Polish relations and the maintenance of Ukrainian national identity in Poland.

Open access

Weblogs and Journalism

A Typology to Explore the Blurring Boundaries

David Domingo and Ari Heinonen

Abstract

From the perspective of journalism, weblogs can be seen as a new category of news and current affairs communication. Although most weblogs do not even pretend to be journalistic or related to current events in the sense shared by institutional media, when bloggers approach the arena of journalism, some of their working principles can challenge traditional professional standards: Conversation with the audience, transparency in the reporting process or even participatory news production are common in blogging. By challenging the conventional understanding of what journalism is, weblogs have revitalized the voices that expect a paradigm shift in journalism in the Internet era. In order to contribute to the debate on the influences of weblogs on journalism and make it more systematic, we propose a typology of journalistic weblogs, along a continuum ranging from the least to the most institutionalized in terms of their relationship to the established media: At one end, we find weblogs produced by the public outside media companies, and at the other end, we find those that are part of media content and produced by professional staff journalists. We argue that weblogs are a symbol of the ongoing change in the relationship between citizens, media and journalists - a change that questions the basic assumptions of the traditional roles of institutional journalism.

Open access

Constructing Karl Popper

How does Science Journalism Employ Literary Devices?

Harald Hornmoen

Abstract

In the US, a new generation of science journalists are employing narrative techniques in their writing. What are the characteristics of this journalism? Why does it employ narrative techniques?

This article attempts to give some answers to these questions by drawing on studies of science and the media. I argue that literary science journalism is predominantly cast in a characteristic semi-narrative, coinciding with what has been regarded as the main aim of this journalism: a skilled translation of abstract knowledge assumed to have been developed by scientist sources.

In a comparative analysis of profiles of scientists written by the journalist John Horgan, I contrast his texts as they first appeared in the magazine Scientific American with later versions in his book The End of Science. The analysis sheds some light on how the different media provide different frames for the journalist’s literary portrayals of the scientists as well as different possibilities with regard to expressing a subjective and critical view on their scientific achievements.

Open access

Eko Harry Susanto and Silviana Dharma Zhang

Abstract

In Indonesia, there are three preconditions for a successful marriage: being of legal age for marriage; parental approval, especially from the father; and religious and ethnic compatibility. The Indonesian Marriage Law provides that “a marriage is legitimate, if it has been performed according to the laws of the respective religions and beliefs of the parties concerned”. This clause indirectly prohibits inter-religious or interfaith marriage. Therefore, every religion in Indonesia encourages it followers to marry someone of the same religious faith. This research examines the issue of interfaith marriage as reported by Indonesia’s cyber media. Case studies are presented to explain why different media institutions have differing stances on the issue. Using a qualitative approach, the research uses the analytical data technique of Norman Fairclough’s critical discourse analysis. The authors analyzed three cyber media, Republika Online, Kompas.com, and Sinarharapan.co from September to December 2014. One key aim was to discover which media have the tendency to support diversity, discourse practice, and sociocultural practice. Results indicated that Islam-oriented media, such as Republika Online, tend to reject the movement for the legalization of interfaith marriage, as interfaith marriage is banned by Islamic shari’ law. Secular online media, such as Kompas.com with an independent ethos of transcendental humanism, lean toward support for rights and legal certainty for interfaith spouses. Meanwhile, Christian-oriented Sinarharapan.co tended to neglect the issue, as if deeming it irrelevant to its readership.

Open access

Data Journalists Using Facebook

A Study of a Resource Group Created by Journalists, for Journalists

Ester Appelgren

Abstract

On Facebook there are interest groups created by journalists, for journalists, that focus on the journalistic profession and work methods. One example is the Swedish group, “Datajournalistik” (in English, “Data Journalism”), which was created in 2012. This article builds on Granovetter’s theory on the strength of weak ties and is focused on the skill development process taking place in the group. A content analysis has been carried out of all posts that received comments in order to explore the social functions of the group. The results indicate both a significant need for knowledge exchange and a need for self-affirmation. At the time of the study, the group was unique in the Nordic countries and as such has played a major role in data journalism’s development process in the Nordic region.

Open access

Rune Ottosen

Abstract

This article analyzes the framing of Norwegian media coverage of the war against terror in Afghanistan with special emphasis of the coverage of the Norwegian military presence in Afghanistan. Two main issues are discussed: 1. How was the start of the war covered in the media in October 2001? 2. In what context was the Norwegian military presence covered? The two newspapers analyzed are Aftenposten and VG. The choice of these two newspapers was made to include Norway’s largest and potentially most influential morning paper (Aftenposten) and its largest tabloid, as well as largest newspaper (VG). Quantitative as well as qualitative methods are used to analyze the coverage. Both Aftenposten’s and VG’s coverage on the first day of the war in Afghanistan are dominated by pro-US framing and the use of Western sources. The pro-US framing is more obvious in Aftenposten than in VG.