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Jerzy Baruk

Abstract

In the era of innovation revolution it is reasonable to conduct a rational innovation policy at the national, regional and enterprise level. Innovations have become an essential factor of the development of enterprises, increasing their competitiveness, improving their market position, increasing their economic efficiency etc. Assumptions of this policy should be based on a precise diagnosis of the existing situation in the field of innovation activity. In this article the attempt of this diagnosis was taken by seeking answers on the following questions: 1) Did companies operating in the Member States of the European Union conduct rational policy in range of innovation activity? 2) Did implemented innovations contribute to obtain the specified turnover? 3) What part of the obtained turnover did enterprises invest in innovation activities? To answer on these questions the method of statistical-comparative analysis of empirical researches was used. These researches were conducted by TNS Political & Social in the 28 Member States of the European Union, Switzerland and the United States in February 2016 on a group 14117 enterprises on EU business innovation terms.

Open access

Leszek Kwieciński

Abstract

This article presents the main elements of the creation of the pro-innovation policy as a new public policy. For understanding this kind of policy we should analyse the structural and functional aspects this public policy. The main concept of structural description pro-innovation policy is a National Innovation System. NIS is being analysed as a sub-functional part of the political system as a whole. This sub-functional political system should also have social and institutional connections. Furthermore, pro-innovation activity is connected with the market, state, and social aspects. The pro-innovation policy and system must be based on social endogenous resources, needs, and possibilities. These are the basic factors for legitimisation and participation, which are crucial elements for the effective implementation of the pro-innovation policy.

Open access

Sebastian Schulz

Abstract

An innovation-driven agenda in regional development policy has emerged in the European Union against the backdrop of peripheralisation, especially in Central and Eastern Europe. Using a discursive analytical framework, the article investigates the ways in which peripheralisation is manifested through language, practices and power-rationalities in Estonian innovation policy discourse. The analysis is footed on key strategic policy documents and semi-structured expert interviews. Findings suggest that Estonian innovation policy’s main narrative of the ‘knowledge-based economy’ accepts growing disparities on sub-national level in order to overcome peripherality at European scale and narrows the range of policy solutions perceived as suitable.

Open access

Miroslav Šipikal

Abstract

The aim of the present paper is to investigate channels of innovation and knowledge transfer in the development of the automotive and wood processing sectors in Slovakia and identify suitable policies to support these innovations. We follow the conceptual framework of innovation patterns and try to identify adequate support policies for different regional innovation patterns. We used interviews with several relevant actors in both sectors to identify their innovation activities and the role the external environment plays in them. We found that better functioning support tools in the region are aimed at key channels of knowledge and innovation transfer.We also support the need for a thematically=regionally focused innovation policy approach, as both sectors and regions require different kinds of innovation policies.

Open access

Vladislav Čadil

Smart specialisation is a main pillar of the Europe 2020 strategy, which creates the basic strategic framework for individual EU policies including the cohesion policy and the research, development and innovation policy for the new programming period. The concept can be defined as a discovery of national/regional strengths in the field of research, development and innovation. Its key characteristic is an accent on innovation and concentration of human and financial resources allocated to research and development into several globally competitive fields, which can become a basis for the next economic growth and prosperity. Each region or state should prepare new innovation strategies based on smart specialisation since such strategies are conditionality for negotiation of new operational programmes. Because the concept is relatively new in the Czech Republic, the article aims at introducing it on the basis of foreign literature and official EU documents, and discussing some problems that should be taken into account in designing the strategy.

Open access

Dawid Szutowski and Julia Szułczyńska

Abstract

Purpose: Despite the importance of innovation, the full innovation potential of companies operating in the industrial sector of Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) seems not to have been unlocked yet. Thus, the primary purpose of the study was to explore the key elements of company innovation policies applied on the way to successful innovation. Methodology: The study is based on qualitative methods. The aim of the study has been achieved through 24 semi-structured interviews conducted with senior management, project leaders, and R&D specialists employed at companies operating in the industrial sector in CEE. The time frame covers the period of the fourth quarter of 2016 and the first quarter of 2017. Findings: Managing disruption consists of focusing on innovation development stage and following market imperatives by making the innovation try to address the market needs. Balancing portfolio requires considering product and process innovation jointly. Furthermore, 62% of the interviewees say that breakthrough innovation results ultimately from numerous incremental advancements. As far as policy integration is concerned, achieving competitive advantage through internal research is common amongst technological leaders, while market contenders turn to external cooperation. Moreover, incorporating CSV principles into the concept of innovation policy appears to be a necessity. Managing intangibilities comes down to patents. Research limitations: The research was burdened with such limitations as respondents experiencing time pressure and the use of only one source of information (the interviewees). Originality: Despite much general evidence, the study attempts to complement the rare qualitative studies on innovation in CEE. It was carried out as a response to the lack of an in-depth study covering such recurrent challenges in the field of company innovation policies as disruption, portfolio balancing, integration, intangibilities’ management, and play.

Open access

Marek Wróblewski and Leszek Kwieciński

Abstract

Nowadays, regional pro-innovation policy concentrates on the creation of endogenous economic resources that are intended to become the main driving force for regional economic growth. In current economic conditions, this resource refers primarily to the paradigm of the knowledge economy. Hence the crucial importance of regional policy is to support the development of innovative enterprises. At the same time, a prerequisite for the more dynamic development of innovative enterprises, and thus the development of the region, is to implement efficient pro-innovation policy instruments. Therefore the main research aim of this paper is to define how the technology parks in Poland, as a regional tool of the public pro-innovation policy, could stimulate innovations as well as competitiveness of SME. The article will be based mostly on the empirical approach, presenting selected results of the nationwide research project financed by the National Science Centre of Poland. The obtained initial empirical data suggest that technology parks in Poland expand highly-specialized services for their tenant enterprises to a very limited extent and focus on basic and routine aspects of their operations (rental, day-to-day administration of premises and equipment etc). In effect, the technology parks in Poland have played so far a very limited role in practice as a stimulus of innovativeness of SME. The study used the method of systemic analysis and also the empirical method (PAPI) for primary data collections.

Open access

Marek Gajewski

Abstract

In the context of increasing globalization, global competition and rapid change the EU sees innovation and its commercialization as an effective way to build long-term global competitive advantage. Innovation policy is a link between research and technological development policy and industrial policy and makes it possible to create conditions conducive to bringing ideas to the market. It is also closely linked to other EU policies regarding e.g. employment, competitiveness, environment, industry and energy. This paper presents the evolution, conditions and objectives of the innovation policy of the European, and describes the main assumptions of the Lisbon and Europe 2020 strategies. Additionally it indicates possible ways of assessing the measures undertaken within the above-mentioned policies and of determining the tools necessary to implement the strategies.

Open access

Amanda Anthony

Abstract

University entrepreneurship is an idea that has gained a significant amount of support globally in the last 30 years and is seen as promoting reinvention, revitalisation, and simply remuneration for the universities themselves and their regions at large. But as universities begin to ramp up their technology transfer activities and start to commercialise their research, it is important to consider the regional context and the regional impacts that this can have. Technology transfer is important, but to truly transform economic “catch-up” regions to future leading regions, it cannot be the only goal of university entrepreneurship. As a result, larger perspective and more government, business, and university collaboration is needed. Using Poland as a focus area, this paper will summarise the concept and development of the entrepreneurial university and the policies needed for success, and show that the technology transfer activity of the university should be considered just one element of regional development strategies. It concludes with policy recommendations that may be useful for Poland and other regions.

Open access

Robert Hassink, Oliver Plum and Arne Rickmers

Abstract

Regional innovation policies have been criticised for being too standardised, one-size-fits-all and place-neutral in character. Embedded in these debates, this paper has two aims: first, to analyse whether industries with different knowledge bases in regions in Germany have different needs for regional innovation policies, and secondly, to investigate whether knowledge bases can contribute to the fine-tuning of regional innovation policies in particular and to a modern, tailor-made, place-based regional innovation policy in general. It concludes that although needs differ due to differences in knowledge bases, those bases are useful only to a limited extent in fine-tuning regional innovation policies