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The Family of the Prague Patriotic Physician Václav Staněk in the Revolutionary Years 1848 and 1849

Abstract

The article deals with the topic of family in the Czech patriotic milieu of the 19th century on the example of the family of Václav Staněk, a physician and patriot. Václav Staněk was in close contact with Josef Frič and František Ladislav Čelakovský. Before the revolution in 1848, Staněk and his wife Karolina opened a Czech ‘parlour’, one of the first places for women interested in education. The paper focuses on the public activities of the family during the revolution 1848 and presents the work of Václav Staněk at the Imperial Diets in Vienna and Kroměříž. Not only does it pay attention to the political activities of Staněk himself, but it also shows the political opinions of his wife a partly his daughter as well. An important space is dedicated to the everyday life of V. Staněk as a member of the Imperial Diets in Vienna and Kroměříž and to the everyday life of his family in Prague. The main source of information is the rich and unexploited correspondence of the Staněk family, which provides insight into the political and family life at that time.

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The Teaching Episode of a Released Prisoner. František Křelina at the School in Český Dub in January 1966

Abstract

The writer František Křelina (1903-1976) graduated from the teaching institute in Jičin. He first taught at village elementary schools in the Nova Paka and Turnov regions. From the mid-1930s, he was a special subject teacher at the council school in Česky Dub. After the town was occupied following the Munich agreement in 1938, he worked at schools in Prague, where his family had also moved. He considered his teaching profession to be a mission. His success and his popularity are evidenced by the extant correspondence with his former students until the end of his life. His teaching activities were terminated by force in 1951, when he was arrested and subsequently, in 1952, sentenced in a political process to 12 years in prison. He was released on amnesty in 1960, but he was not allowed to return to his profession. He thus worked as a construction labourer, retiring in 1964. In 1965, he was given an unexpected opportunity to work as a substitute teacher at his former school in Česky Dub. Since his rehabilitation proceedings had not been completed, however, he had to leave the school again three days later. In order not to cause problems for the headmaster, he excused his leaving by a pretended illness. Nevertheless, the three days were enough for his personality to leave a deep and lasting impression on the hearts of both his students and his teacher colleagues - their correspondence is full of respect and admiration. The history of the teaching activities of František Křelina, who was not allowed to achieve his full fulfilment, hence demonstrates the violence, malevolence and crimes of Communist totalitarian power.

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From the Legacy of the Landfras Printing Works in the Jindřichův Hradec Archives – a Mirror of Time in Family Correspondence

Abstract

The article studies the set of 27 original letters deposited in the Documentation Collection – Cultural-Historical Archives of the State District Archives of Jindřichův Hradec. This collection contains documents of non-official provenance concerning, among other topics, also remarkable figures of the town. A leading position among them is assumed by the Landfras family, whose members were not only owners of a prosperous printing works, but also patriots, leaders of the town, and supporters of education, societies and culture. The letters provide an insight into the private lives of the members of the Landfras family, in particular its most significant member, Alois Landfras, and people connected with the family. The article deals with an overall comparison of the letters. It studies references to them and to events in their family, and connections with their life in Jindřichův Hradec. It adds some less known information on the studies of Alois Landfras at the university in Prague, providing an insight into his inner world. The article is complemented by a synoptic table of all letters, including the quoted persons and places.

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Karel Havlíček in More Recent Scientific Literature

Abstract

Based on an analysis of monographs and the main scientific studies devoted to Karel Havlíček, the article aims to present the basic topics and directions of research on Karel Havlíček while drawing attention to professional desiderata. It deals with Havlíček’s monumental biography by Karel Kazbunda, which was not published until five decades after it was written, and other, smaller monographic publications on Havlíček. Among other things, the paper describes also other works analysing Havlíček’s other life, his work as a journalist and his involvement in the polemics against the book of poems České listy by Siegfried Kapper, and indicates new impulses for research brought by the editorial preparation and synoptic analysis of Havlíček’s correspondence.

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Following the Traces of Books in the Brisigell Family

Abstract

The Brisigells were one of the families that settled in Bohemia in connection with land acquisitions during the Thirty Years’ War. The family achieved its greatest wealth in the second generation at the turn of the 18th century. The third generation suffered a gradual decline, caused i.a. by financial difficulties and debt. After the middle of the 18th century, the family disappeared from Bohemia. The electronic cataloguing of early printed books with systematically recorded provenances has made it possible to identify in the collections of the Strahov Library and the National Library a small set of books previously owned by individual family members. Not only has the analysis enabled insight into the reading interests of the Brisigell family, but it has also provided information on the wandering of the books within the family as well as within friendly and business relations with other noblemen in the regions of West and Southwest Bohemia.

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The comparative context and methodology of literary history in Hanuš Jelínek’s Histoire de la littérature tchèque

Abstract

The paper evaluates the importance of the French-written Histoire de la littérature tchèque I–III [The History of Czech Literature] (1930–1935) by Hanuš Jelínek (1878–1944), a leading expert and authority on French–Czech cultural relations. His synthetic work destined for French readers and completed outside the modern methodological context of the 1930s draws on Ernest Denis’ concept of Czech literary development as the ‘literature of struggle’ against the German element, while its composition is inspired by Arne Novák’s history written in German, and his expository method follows in the footsteps of his mentor Jaroslav Vlček. Therefore, Jelínek conceives literary development as a continual motion of ideas within an aesthetic form, as a subject-stratified, multi-layered story unified by the central outlook enabling him on the one hand to emphasise the nationally defensive aspect of Czech literature, and, on the other hand, to present it through parallels and illustrative examples within the European perspective. Jelínek’s Histoire, supplemented with a number of his own translations of Czech authors, is a particular narrative–historical genre – the epitome of the young Czech nation’s cultural policy and an archetype of cordial relations between the Czechoslovak and French cultures.

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‘At thepresent time, it is worth mentioning the Kutná Hora Epistles by Karel Havliček.’ The First Biographer of Karel Havlíček, Ludwig Rittersberg

Abstract

Karel Havlíček (1821–1856), a Czech journalist and literally a symbol of Czech journalism, has been studied by countless authors in texts of various scope and importance. Nevertheless, the journalist and writer Ludwig Rittersberg (1809–1858) will always remain the first to have extensively summarised Havlíček’s life and devoted further attention to him in his Kapesní slovníček novinářský a konverzační [A Pocket Dictionary of Journalism and Conversation], at the time when both Havlíček himself and his work had suffered from actions on the part of the authorities.

Rittersberg admitted that he had not been Havlíček’s absolute ideological supporter during the revolution of 1848 and 1849, yet he presented Havlíček’s professional career, opinions and life story to his readers in his work with considerable respect. Not only did he devote a relatively extensive entry to him, but he also referred to him in other entries. Rittersberg used such a comparison to describe expressively the situation at the time or the political situation gaining ground after the defeat of the revolution of 1848 and 1849, but also the contemporary situation in the press.

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Vilém Gabler’s Library and Alexander the Great

Abstract

The article is divided into three parts. The first one aims to present the figure of Vilém Gabler, a close colleague of Karel Havlíček and František Ladislav Rieger, as a person important for the beginnings of Czech–French relations and for the spread of the knowledge of the Czech language and culture in the Czech milieu. The second part is devoted to the summary of previous research and the reconstruction of the personal library of Vilém Gabler, scattered in the central collection of the National Museum Library. The last, third part discusses Gabler’s article Alexander Veliký [Alexander the Great], written in reaction to the work Alexandre le Grand from the pen of Alphonse de Lamartine and under the impression of the events of 1859. Despite its thematic focus on the ancient commander, it provides abundant information on the author’s view of the recent Austrian-Czech past as well as present. It thus shows a man with his own world of opinion and moral schemes created based on his own experience from 1848 and strongly influenced by the study of French history, especially the period after 1789.

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Personal Libraries in the National Museum – a Valuable Source of Information on the History of Book Culture in the 19th Century and the Early 20th Century

Abstract

Book collections from the 19th century and the first half of the 20th century preserved in the NM are among the richest and most interesting book collections of the Czech Republic. Research into personal book collections of the NM within the NAKI project (2012–2015), including besides the historical book collection also books from the 19th and 20th centuries, has provided valuable information on the history of the entire book culture. The PROVENIO database is an important source of information and knowledge in terms of book owners and ownership provenance, library history, bibliophilia and the reception by readers, as well as the history of book binding, book publishing houses and book trade of the given period.

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Hanuš Jelínek’s Beginnings in Mercure de France

Abstract

The aim of this article is to describe the beginnings of the cooperation between Hanuš Jelínek and the journal and publishing house Mercure de France. In March 1900, Jelínek published, under the pseudonym Jean Otokar, his first study ‘La Poésie moderne tchèque’ in the Parisian journal. For some time, the critic then wrote the column ‘Lettres tchèques’ (August 1900 – February 1903) in Mercure – after Alexandr Bačkovský (alias Jean Rowalski) and before William Ritter. The early origin of the ‘Lettres tchèques’ of Bačkovský and Jelínek as a result of the aesthetic affinity between literary and artistic modernism on the one hand and some French and Francophone circles of the time on the other has the merit of introducing the readers of an important French periodical to Czech production. These columns have their firm place in the history of Czech efforts to gain recognition in France and the French-speaking world.

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