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The Effects Of Swimming And Dry-Land Resistance Training Programme On Non-Swimmers

Abstract

Introduction. The aim of the study was to estimate the influence of combined swimming and dry-land resistance training on swimming force, swimming performance and strength in non-swimmers.

Material and methods. Thirty male non-swimmers took part in the research. They were randomly assigned to one of the two groups: experimental (n=17) and control (n=13). The experimental group took part in combined swimming and dry-land resistance training. The control group took part in swimming training only. The swimming and dry-land resistance training programme lasted twelve weeks (48 training sessions of swimming and 36 sessions of dry-land resistance training). Average training volume and intensity were the same for all swimmers throughout the study protocol. The training programme included dominant aerobic work in front crawl.

Results. Dry-land resistance training applied in the experimental group significantly improved the upper body strength. In spite of the theory that dry-land strength training is probably not specific enough to improve the sprint swim performance, the experimental group tended to demonstrate greater improvement in sprint performance. The imitation of the underwater phase of shoulder work during front crawl provided by the ergometer can be a useful training method in non-swimmers.

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Training Program for Military Students for the Improvement of the Freestyle Swimming Method

Abstract

In this paper we wanted to demonstrate that improving swimming performance, even over a short period of time, requires a centralized training program. The subjects of the research were checked on a distance of 50m freestyle before and after the application of the centralized training program, and the results were compared with those from the control group who did not benefit from the centralized training program, the latter ones having participated only in the classes of the approved syllabus. All the results from the research were interpreted objectively, the resulting figures being the actual support of this study. The tests and the program applied proved relevant in view of the purpose of this study

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Motor skill development for children between the ages of 6 to 8 as a result of finishing an initiation level swimming course

Abstract

Introduction: Swimming, as an activity, covers many of the basic humanistic needs by creating a state of wellbeing as well as help form a holistic person by developing their motor skills, cognition and affection through the stresses of training for competition or just by practicing for recreational purposes. Various scientific studies show the importance of the motor skill component when selecting those fit for competitive swimming. Additionally, there are other studies that demonstrate that swimming can have an anthropometric effect over the body. The purpose of our study was to test if an initiation level swimming course would produce a development of basic motor skills in children between the ages of 6 to 8.

Methodology and Participants: for this study we recruited 10 participants out of which 5 were girls and the remaining 5 were boys. Their age (7,1±0,73) is between 6 and 8 where two of the children are 6 years of age, five are 7 years of age and the last three are 8 years of age. In order to conduct the study, we employed a set of tests that rely on 7 events extracted from the stock of EUROFIT tests.

Results: the final results show that the participants have improved their performances with strong statistical significance.

Conclusions: Undergoing an initiation level swimming course results in a noticeable development of motor skills as well as from the homogeneity of the group, which is considerably improved at final testing.

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Qualitative Evaluation of Water Displacement in Simulated Analytical Breaststroke Movements

Qualitative Evaluation of Water Displacement in Simulated Analytical Breaststroke Movements

One purpose of evaluating a swimmer is to establish the individualized optimal technique. A swimmer's particular body structure and the resulting movement pattern will cause the surrounding water to react in differing ways. Consequently, an assessment method based on flow visualization was developed complimentary to movement analysis and body structure quantification. A fluorescent dye was used to make the water displaced by the body visible on video. To examine the hypothesis on the propulsive mechanisms applied in breaststroke swimming, we analyzed the movements of the surrounding water during 4 analytical breaststroke movements using the flow visualization technique.

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The Effect of Depth on Drag During the Streamlined Glide: A Three-Dimensional CFD Analysis

The Effect of Depth on Drag During the Streamlined Glide: A Three-Dimensional CFD Analysis

The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of depth on drag during the streamlined glide in swimming using Computational Fluid Dynamics. The Computation Fluid Dynamic analysis consisted of using a three-dimensional mesh of cells that simulates the flow around the considered domain. We used the K-epsilon turbulent model implemented in the commercial code Fluent® and applied it to the flow around a three-dimensional model of an Olympic swimmer. The swimmer was modeled as if he were gliding underwater in a streamlined prone position, with hands overlapping, head between the extended arms, feet together and plantar flexed. Steady-state computational fluid dynamics analyses were performed using the Fluent® code and the drag coefficient and the drag force was calculated for velocities ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 m/s, in increments of 0.50m/s, which represents the velocity range used by club to elite level swimmers during the push-off and glide following a turn. The swimmer model middle line was placed at different water depths between 0 and 1.0 m underwater, in 0.25m increments. Hydrodynamic drag decreased with depth, although after 0.75m values remained almost constant. Water depth seems to have a positive effect on reducing hydrodynamic drag during the gliding. Although increasing depth position could contribute to decrease hydrodynamic drag, this reduction seems to be lower with depth, especially after 0.75 m depth, thus suggesting that possibly performing the underwater gliding more than 0.75 m depth could not be to the benefit of the swimmer.

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Altitude Training and its Influence on Physical Endurance in Swimmers

Altitude Training and its Influence on Physical Endurance in Swimmers

It is possible to plan an altitude training (AT) period in such a way that the enhanced physical endurance obtained as a result of adaptation to hypoxia will appear and can be used to improve performance in competition. Yet finding rationales for usage of AT in highly trained swimmers is problematic. In practice AT, in its various forms, is still controversial, and an objective review of research concentrating on the advantages and disadvantages of AT has been presented in several scientific publications, including in no small part the observations of swimmers. The aim of this article is to review the various methods and present both the advantageous and unfavourable physiological changes that occur in athletes as a result of AT. Moreover, AT results in the sport of swimming have been collected. They include an approach towards primary models of altitude/hypoxic training: live high + train high, live high + train low, live low + train high, as well as subsequent methods: Intermittent Hypoxic Exposure (IHE) and Intermittent Hypoxic Training (IHT). Apnoea training, which is descended from freediving, is also mentioned, and which can be used with, or as a substitute for, the well-known IHE or IHT methods. In conclusion, swimmers who train using hypoxia may be among the best-trained athletes, and that even a slight improvement in physical endurance might result in the shortening of a swimming time in a given competition, and the achievement of a personal best, which is hard to obtain by normal training methods, when the personal results of the swimmer have reached a plateau.

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The Swimming Ability of Children with Asthma

Summary

This paper reports on findings of a pilot research to determine the level of swimming ability of children with weak respiratory system aged between 10 - 11 years, who attended special classes for asthmatics. Swimming ability was assessed by 25 m free style swimming test. The results of asthmatics were compared with healthy peers (Benčuriková 2006; Kováčová 2010; Labudová 2011). The results confirmed that the level of swimming capability of asthmatic children, despite their handicap, is significantly higher than their healthy peers.

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The Ontogenetic Development Prerequisites of Physical Activities in the Aquatic Environment in Early Childhood

Summary

The text deals with neurophysiological and kinesiological developmental principles associated with the early development of young children as the fundamental prerequisites for physical education in the aquatic environment. Swimming in infancy and early childhood using the developmental principles and understanding of individual variability represent enormous potential to create a positive attitude of the child to exercise in aquatic environments. We believe that the experience with these basic tasks can play a key role in future exercise habits and swimming literacy of the individual. Parents attending infant swimming courses led by an instructor acquire practical skills and deeper insight into principles of their child's motor learning. All activities in the aquatic environment at an early age should allow transfer of child’s experiences to preswimming education and result in full swimming literacy.

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Reconstruction Error of Calibration Volume's Coordinates for 3D Swimming Kinematics

Reconstruction Error of Calibration Volume's Coordinates for 3D Swimming Kinematics

The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy and reliability of above and underwater 3D reconstruction of three calibration volumes with different control points disposal (#1 - on vertical and horizontal rods; #2 - on vertical and horizontal rods and facets; #3 - on crossed horizontal rods). Each calibration volume (3 × 2 × 3 m) was positioned in a 25 m swimming pool (half above and half below the water surface) and recorded with four underwater and two above water synchronised cameras (50 Hz). Reconstruction accuracy was determined calculating the RMS error of twelve validation points. The standard deviation across all digitisation of the same marker was used for assessing the reliability estimation. Comparison among different number of control points showed that the set of 24 points produced the most accurate results. The volume #2 presented higher accuracy (RMS errors: 5.86 and 3.59 mm for × axis, 3.45 and 3.11 mm for y axis and 4.38 and 4.00 mm for z axis, considering under and above water, respectively) and reliability (SD: underwater cameras ± [0.2; 0.6] mm; above water cameras ± [0.2; 0.3] mm) that may be considered suitable for 3D swimming kinematic analysis. Results revealed that RMS error was greater during underwater analysis, possibly due to refraction.

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Anaerobic endurance of young swimmers aged 12 years

Anaerobic endurance of young swimmers aged 12 years

Study aim: To assess the effects of swimming training on anaerobic endurance, swimming velocity and chest girth in children aged 12 years.

Material and methods: Two groups of children aged 12 years were studied. Group S (14 boys and 6 girls) training swimming at a sport-oriented school 3 days a week, 90 min per session, and Group R (6 boys and 6 girls) engaged in competitive swimming for 4 years. Children from Group S were subjected twice (in September and in February) to a swimming test consisting of 6 bouts of swimming the 12.5-m distance, spaced by 30-s intermissions. Mean and maximum swimming velocities in the entire test were recorded together with their ratio (Performance Index, PI). In children from Group R the swimming velocity at one 12.5-distance was recorded.

Results: Apart from somatic indices, significant increases over the 5-month training period were noted in mean swimming velocity in boys and girls (p<0.001) and in maximum velocity in boys (p<0.01). No significant changes were noted in the performance index or in heart rate.

Conclusions: Performance index as a measure of anaerobic endurance may serve as a useful tool in assessing the adaptive performance changes in young swimmers.

Open access