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Revitalised geotourism mining heritage potentials in the Posavje Folds

Abstract

The territory of the Posavje Folds offers many geotourism potentials reflecting in particular in rich mining heritage. For a long time, local communities have considered them mainly in the context of local problems, but nowadays we may see individual examples of successful revitalization of cave chambers and mining structures. All that has given rise to fantastic stories about the mining wealth of the underground world and the mining heritage interpreted with modern approaches and new findings. In addition to managers and heritage owners, the revitalization process also includes scientists, artists, architects and educators who, each in their own way, contribute to a holistic perspective of the values of the past in light of contemporary understanding of this type of heritage. As a result, the territory has witnessed the revitalization of the medieval lead and silver mine Padež pri Laškem, the former Laško coal mine machine room, which was transformed into the Strojnica Gallery, and the polymineral mine Sitarjevec within the last five years. All mentioned examples are cases of abandoned mining activities with long-lasting mining tradition, which left an imprint in the area in terms of the diverse social structure of the population and in terms of town development, which also allows us to evaluate from a distance the contribution to the construction of the railway between Vienna and Trieste, which put these towns on the European map of centres of industrial significance in the mid-19th century. Trains that still connect the Austrian capital with the Adriatic coast may in future, in light of sustainable green tourism, attract curious guests to stop and linger a while, which is the ultimate goal of the attempts of local communities to revitalise mining heritage. Meanwhile, the goals set can only be realised with the help of new and attractive tourist products that reflect own creativity related with tradition ranging from design ideas, music events, art installations, popular science evenings; in short, with contents that are suited to visitors of all ages.

Open access
Military Brownfields in the Czech Republic and the Potential for their Revitalisation, Focused on their Residential Function

Abstract

One of the basic transformation processes of the period since 1989 has been that of demilitarisation. Among other things, one of its consequences is the emergence of abandoned military buildings and areas - so-called military brownfields. These kinds of brownfields have a large number of specific features to which their subsequent revitalisation must necessarily be adapted. Since a large number of these areas are situated within municipalities or are directly adjacent to them, it is essential for their revitalisation to be approached with great sensitivity. This contribution deals with chosen examples of Czech revitalised post-military areas with a special view to their residential function, which is presently their dominant functional use.

Open access
Revitalizing urban revitalization in Poland: Towards a new agenda for research and practice

Abstract

As a starting point, this paper recognizes the key role of the notion of ‘revitalization’ in the development of the multi-sectoral approach to urban renewal in Poland over the last 15 years. Thus, while acknowledging the important limitations of revitalization programs to date, it aims not so much to reject or criticize the current model revitalization, but rather to ‘revitalize’ the notion of revitalization itself. Based both on interviews with engaged practitioners of revitalization in Poland and on a review of practices existing elsewhere, this paper seeks to infuse the Polish imaginary of revitalization with transformative policy agendas.

Open access
The Function of Hotels in Revitalizing Rural Areas: Case Studies in Pomerania Province

Abstract

This article indicates optimal local, social, economic and geographical relationships contributing to the effective implementation of hotel investment as a part of rural area revitalisation. This will be undertaken through the case studies of four hotels functioning in revitalized historical buildings in the rural areas of Pomerania Province. A ‘multiple case study’ will be performed based on the following methods: 1) the desk study of the data concerning the activity of the hotels; 2) a micro- and meso-scale cartographic inventory; 3) structured individual in-depth interviews with hotel owners and managers, as well as with the authorities and officials responsible for the promotion of the communes where the hotels are situated.

Open access
in Turyzm
People, Place and Partnership: Exploring Strategies to Revitalise Town Centres

Abstract

More and more town centres in Western Europe are in decline, as indicated by growing shop vacancy rates in shopping streets. To turn the tide, decision makers look for revitalisation strategies. Are there any solutions? Making use of theoretical insights, empirical findings and anecdotal evidence from the Netherlands, we suggest that town centre revitalisation is a matter of connecting people, place and partnership. First, strategies should be based on an understanding of how customers (people) behave. Secondly, redesign of the physical environment (place) might be needed, since visitors prefer compact centres that are built on a human scale and known for a unique profile. Finally, close collaboration between a wide range of local stakeholders (partnership) is essential. We conclude that town centre revitalisation is possible, but takes a lot of energy and patience from the actors involved.

Open access
Management of invasive plant species in the valley of the River Ślepiotka in Katowice – the example of the REURIS project

Abstract

In recent years, programmes aimed at improving environmental conditions in river valleys within urban spaces have been initiated in many of the European Community countries. An example is the project “Revitalization of Urban River Spaces – REURIS” which was implemented in 2009-2012. Its main aim was to revitalize a part of the valley of the River Ślepiotka in Katowice. One of the tasks of the project was a comprehensive treatment to combat invasive plant species occurring in this area, carried out by using a combination of chemical and mechanical methods. Chemical treatment involved the application of herbicide mixtures, and mechanical treatment included, among others, mowing and/or removal of the undesirable plants. The work focused primarily on reducing the spread of two species of the Impatiens genus: I. glandulifera and I. parviflora, and the species Padus serotina, Reynoutria japonica and Solidago canadensis. Currently, the maintenance works on this section of the river are performed by the Urban Greenery Department in Katowice, which continues the elimination of invasive plants, according to the objectives of the REURIS program. In 2012 the Department of Botany and Nature Protection at the Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection started to monitor the implementation and the effects of the implemented actions for elimination and participated in the action of removal of selected invasive plant species: Impatiens parviflora and Reynoutria japonica within specific areas. These actions led to a reduction in the area occupied by invasive plants and a weakening of their growth rate and ability to reproduce.

Open access
Various Aspects of the Genesis and Perspectives on Agricultural Brownfields in the Czech Republic

Abstract

Abandoned agricultural objects from the period of large-scale agricultural production in the socialist era represent a peculiar topic in the former communist countries of Eastern Europe, surpassing the experience of the EU15 countries or USA that have extensive and long-standing practice in brownfields redevelopment. The question of brownfields resulting from the transformation of the agricultural sector during the transition period of the Czech Republic is presented in this paper. Agricultural brownfields are the most frequently occurring brownfields in the Czech Republic (especially in some regions), but their area share is much lower, indicating their spatial disposition in the landscape. Some aspects of agricultural brownfields regeneration, including possibilities of its funding, are discussed in the paper. We also deal with geographical, environmental and historical aspects of the existence of these localities in the Czech Republic in the context of potential financial resources and possibilities for funding their revitalization.

Open access
Revitalisation of spoil tips and socio-economic polarisation – a case study of Ruhr area (Germany)

Abstract

The paper discusses issues about the revitalisation of spoil tips, socio-economic polarisation and social exclusion in the field of municipal recreational activities based on an example of the largest post-industrial region in Europe – the Ruhr area in Germany. Revitalisation of brownfield areas very often leads to the creation of leisure facilities of various types (with a range of entrance fees) and because of this it may mitigate, or exacerbate, the severity of these negative phenomena. In the Ruhr area there are 104 spoil tips of different origins (mine tips, slag heaps, rubbish dumps), sizes and shapes (from conical heaps, through table mountains shaped tips and intentionally shaped for landscape tips, to major tips) and state of preservation. The research has shown that it is possible to use the majority of these spoil tips in the Ruhr area (87 of them) as leisure facilities as they have been changed into green areas, parks, playgrounds, locations for sports activities and tourist attractions after their restoration. Furthermore, they are mostly accessible free of charge and may serve a wide range of people – from locals to visitors, from children to senior citizens etc., regardless of their income. As such they may mitigate the socio-economic polarisation tendencies in the region.

Open access
Linear revitalization – problems and challenges. Discursive article

Summary

The aim of the article, defined by the author as discursive, is to give the answer as to whether within ‘revitalization’ we should distinguish the notion of ‘linear revitalization’ – not yet defined in Polish and English-language literature. The author presents the thesis that we should do so by presenting the idea, its specific character and its role. This kind of action seems to have, in the author’s opinion, a positive influence on contemporary cities regarding the growing problems that result from fragmentation and lack of physical, social, economic and ecological connectivity. The general overview of revitalization provides the basis for proving the necessity of specific solutions relating to degraded linear structures. Linear revitalization, as presented, relates to different city structures which need renewal. It may become an important tool for sustainable city development and may improve the quality of life. Theoretical deliberations, presenting the reasons, needs, ideas, draft classifications, tasks and positive effects of linear revitalization have been supplemented by some case studies from Poland and abroad. The benefits to whole city structures of carrying out linear revitalization are presented. They justify the creation of a new definition and further research. The approach presented, being in the author’s opinion the beginning of the discussion, meets the need to look for effective new methods and tools within urban revitalization, solving the problems and fulfilling the new challenges of contemporary cities.

Open access
Restoring the riverside in a city: an examination of best practices for port revitalisation

Abstract

Rivers have been an important element of urban development for centuries, affecting human life and providing a number of functions connected with commerce, defence, transport, communication and culture. Today’s river-city relationship takes on a completely different dimension and is considered through the prism of the beauty which shapes the urban landscape and is a key element in integrating its inhabitants. It affects the city’s economic fabric, for instance through increased tourism and investment. Besides, it provides an impetus for the implementation of numerous architectural and urban projects whose task is to integrate its space or, as is often the case, insure the future viability of the riverside, including former port areas.

Therefore the aim of this paper is to analyse projects which represent so-called best practice in the restoration of city riverside areas using examples from Western European cities which have experienced the implementation of such projects. The paper presents an analysis of cities selected due to the availability of source materials: Düsseldorf, the largest revitalised area, followed by London and Hamburg, the smallest. It should be emphasised that the author will continue her research on the former port areas, focusing mainly on the German sites.

Open access