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A digital Jewish history?

Abstract

How can we teach Jewish history in a modern and effective way? In Hamburg, Germany, a school project called Geschichtomat tries to find an answer to that question. With the help of digital media, students explore their Jewish neighbourhood. This one-of-a-kind German program permits students to experience the Jewish past and present life in their hometown. During the project, students explore their neighbourhood to understand its historical figures, places, and events. This way they engage with Jewish life. Under the supervision of experts in the disciplines of history and media education, the students will: research, perform interviews with cultural authorities and contemporary witnesses, visit museums and archives, shoot and cut films, edit photos and write accompanying texts. Finally, their contributions are uploaded to the geschichtomat.de website. Little by little a digital map of Jewish life from the perspective of teenagers will take shape.

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Nineteenth century early childhood institutions in Aotearoa New Zealand: Legacies of enlightenment and colonisation

Abstract

The nineteenth century colonial setting of Aotearoa NZ is the most distant from the cradle of European Enlightenment that sparked new understandings of childhood, learning and education and spearheaded new approaches to the care and education of young children outside of the family home. The broader theme of the Enlightenment was about progress and the possibilities of the ongoing improvement of peoples and institutions. The young child was seen as a potent force in this transformation and a raft of childhood institutions, including the 19th century infant school, kindergarten, and crèche were a consequence. The colonisation and settlement of Aotearoa NZ by European settlers coincided with an era in which the potency of new aspirations for new kinds of institutions for young children seeded. It is useful in the 21st century to reframe the various waves of colonial endeavour and highlight the dynamic interfaces of being colonised for the indigenous populations; being a colonial for the settler populations; and the power and should be purposed of the colonising cultures of Europe. It can be argued that in the context of ECE neither the indigenous nor settler populations of Aotearoa NZ were passive recipients of European ECE ideas but, separately and together, forged new understandings of childhood and its institutions; enriched and shaped by the lessons learned in the colonial setting of Aotearoa NZ.

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The Pedagogical Work of Vieth and GutsMuths

Abstract

Introduction:Philanthropism as it evolved at the end of the 18th century in Germany wanted to break completely with the contemporary methods persisting in education, with the hegemony of classical languages, and with the study of antique authors’ works; instead, it laid emphasis on practical and useful knowledge, on teaching modern languages, on acquiring knowledge based on demonstration, and on an intimate connection to nature. The aim of philanthropist education was to train virtuous citizens who honestly pursue their ordinary profession, in whose training they assigned a central role to physical education.

Purpose:In our paper, which is a part of our research exploring the appearance of the pedagogical ideas of philanthropism in Hungary, we set out to investigate the question: What was the focus of physical education in the philanthropinums? As a first step in our investigation, we give an overview of the philanthropists’ ideas regarding physical education, then we take a close look at how these ideas were put into practice in two selected institutions, namely among the walls of the philanthropinums in Dessau and Schnepfenthal, by relying on the contemporary works of Gerhard Ulrich Anton Vieth and Johann Christoph Friedrich GutsMuths. Finally, we consider their impact in Hungary.

Methods:In this study we apply the source analysis as a traditional research method in the history of education.

Conclusions:The impact of philanthropism on contemporary Hungarian public education, especially in the first half of the 19th century, can be clearly detected, which can be accredited to study trips to Germany and the Hungarian translations of German works. The presence of philanthropism can also be perceived in swimming instruction. Basedow and GutsMuths initiated the instruction of swimming and lifeguarding, and the general institutionalization of swimming instruction. The impact of philanthropists could also be felt in Hungary. Károly (Carl) Csillagh’s textbook on swimming appeared in German in 1841 with the title “Der philantropische Schwimmmeister” (“The Philanthropist Swimming Instructor”). The first book on swimming in Hungarian appeared in 1842.

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Grading of Pupils in History: One-Year Research in the Czech Republic

Abstract

Introduction: The aim of the research was to point to a wide range of factors of the pupils’ grading in History classes and to find out if this grading on the given sample corresponds with the context of the independently selected variables: pupils’ weight, inclination to the Socratic type of values, type of family, and parents’ education. Methods: A sample of 1819 7th grade pupils was made up of the pupils of randomly addressed primary schools willing to cooperate. In the course of one school year, a questionnaire survey was carried out on this sample: each of the 14 regions of the Czech Republic was represented by 5 to 9% of the respondents. Data were evaluated at a 5% level of significance by means of the Chi-squared test. Results: In all the monitored cases, a statistically significant link was demonstrated between the dependent variable (pupils’ grading) and independent variables, i.e. the results in History have a wide-spectrum effect. Discussion: The research findings correspond with the results obtained by other scholars, and external factors (independent variables) significantly affect the pupils’ school success regardless of their mental and intellectual dispositions. Limitations: School success is simply monitored through numerical grading of pupils, which does not always and completely reflect the pupils’ progress in terms of their development. It was not a longitudinal survey but only a single one-year research from which no major conclusions can be drawn. Conclusions: It was confirmed that the results of pupils in History, or their historical knowledge, represent a broad-spectrum matter in which the multiplication effect of external influences must be counted. In the future, research should be carried out in longer time ranges and with a greater emphasis on the causality of the phenomena.

Open access
The world of female educational institutions

Abstract

Introduction: Philanthropism, as it evolved at the end of the 18th century in Germany, wanted to break completely with the contemporary methods persisting in education, with the hegemony of classical languages, and with the study of antique authors’ works; instead, it laid emphasis on practical and useful knowledge, on teaching modern languages, on acquiring knowledge based on demonstration, and on an intimate connection to nature. The impact of philanthropism on contemporary Hungarian public education, especially in the first half of the 19th century, can be clearly detected, which can be accredited to study trips to Germany and the Hungarian translations of German works. Salzmann’s institution, founded in 1784 was visited by 366 Hungarian educators, among others by Teréz Brunszvik, who also gave an account of her impressions in her memoires. Yet, we also need to mention Samuel Tessedik, who made good use of his experience gained during his journey to Germany in his school in Szarvas. Purpose: In this study, four 19th century female educational institutions were selected and the presence of philanthropist ideas in the training offered there was investigated. Three of these were established for the education of the middle-class, while one was founded specifically for aristocrats. We investigated whether the presence of philanthropism can be detected in the education offered by these four schools. Methods: In the presented study, we applied source analysis as a traditional research method in history of education. Conclusions: All the institutions under scrutiny have it in common that the founding and contributing educators and teachers were provably well-acquainted with the pedagogy of the philanthropists, and they incorporated several of its elements into their programmes. The preparation for the housewife role, conveying knowledge utilizable in practice, practical approach to teaching content, and the application of the method of illustration were all emphasized. These features show that several philanthropist characteristics can be identified in the educational principles and curricula of these institutions. Nevertheless, on closer inspection, it cannot be stated that they would have taken on an institutional character exclusively reminiscent of the “philanthropinums”

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Prof. Aleksandar Josifovich Ignjatovski, Founder and First Director of the Clinic for Internal Medicine and the First Head of the Department of Internal Medicine at the Faculty of Medicine in Skopje, R. Macedonia

Abstract

Aleksandar J. Ignjatovski was born in the Smolensk Region, Russia, on 18.03.1875. He graduated from the Faculty of Medicine in St. Petersburg in 1899 where he started specialization in internal medicine and continued in Berlin, Heidelberg, Munich and Paris. In 1905 he was elected assistant professor in St. Petersburg, continued as an associate professor in Odessa in 1908 and a full-time professor in 1912 in Warsaw. During the October Revolution, he was the Head of the Internal Clinic in Rostov, and in 1920 he emigrated to Belgrade. In 1922 he was appointed full professor and Director of the First Internal Clinic at the Faculty of Medicine in Belgrade, which he established, developed and managed until his retirement in 1946. In 1948 he moved to Skopje as a full professor and first Director of the Internal Clinic at the Faculty of Medicine in Skopje. He studied the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis and first proved it experimentally, and published a paper in 1908, indicating that it was associated with higher blood cholesterol level. He also dealt with immunobiology and infectious diseases, in particular tuberculosis and tetanus. Prof. A. Ignjatovski was an excellent clinician, teacher and scientist, who published over 80 papers. His most important textbooks are “Clinical Semiotics and Symptomatic Therapy”, in two editions, in Russian (1919) and in Serbian (1929-37), and “The Basics of Internal Propedeutics” in three volumes, published in Skopje in 1952, 1954 and 1963. The work of Prof. A. Ignjatovski, as a leading clinician and a great teacher and scientist, is embedded in the development of internal medicine, and medicine in general, in Russia, Serbia and Macedonia. The bright memorial of the founder and first director of the Internal Medicine Clinic and the first Head of the Department of Internal Medicine at the Faculty of Medicine in Skopje has been permanently incorporated in the history of medicine in R. Macedonia. Prof. A. Ignjatovski died on 18.08.1955.

Open access
in PRILOZI
Practical Education in Secondary Educational Institutions for Teachers’ Training

Abstract

Between 1950 and 1959, teacher training in secondary schools meant an education to last for four years followed by a specified final exam and a practice period of one year. Trainee teachers were subsequently expected to take a qualifying exam. The objective of the investigation is to present and analyse the forms and the documents related to the regulation in practical training. In the course of the essay we will go into details concerning the difficulties and problems in organising practical training as well as the issue whether the vocational training allowed to contribute to develop trainee teachers’ expertise. The use of primary sources such as curricula and regulations were included during the investigation.

Open access
Functional Literacy in People's Lives

Functional Literacy in People's Lives

The paper presents the results of a qualitative study into the lives of people with inadequate functional literacy skills. The data were collected through a biographical interview with a respondent whose characteristics correspond to those of a hypothetical person likely to exhibit signs of low functional literacy. The characteristics, such as gender, age, parental education achievements and job history, of this hypothetical person have been derived from the results of research into adult functional literacy undertaken in the Czech Republic in 1998-International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS). The analysis of the qualitative data focuses on three domains of the respondent's life, namely her family life, her school years, and her life style. The paper identifies the coping strategies used by the respondent in her everyday life.

Open access
Teacher Attitudes Toward Game-based Learning in History Education

Abstract

Game-based learning (GBL) is an emerging field reaching new contexts. Research has reported about students’ rich use of digital games and the learning potential of GBL in traditional school subjects. Digital games have been tested as educational tools in various subjects in Swedish schools during the last decade, in areas such as teaching and learning of history and foreign languages. However, there is a lack of detailed research on attitudes toward the use of GBL in history education.

Main aim of the study was to examine and discuss attitudes toward an increased use of digital games in formal history education. Earlier studies have analysed students’ opinions and preferences, but this study has a focus on the teacher perspective and on which design factors are important if digital games should be an alternative for self-learning in history education. The research approach has been qualitative cross-sectional study where secondary school teachers have answered questionnaires with open-ended questions on their view of didactics and the use of GBL in formal education. All selected respondents are registered as professional secondary school history teachers. Furthermore, teachers have described their own gaming habits and their game design preferences.

Findings show that a majority of the informants have good knowledge about digital games with historical setting and also a positive attitude toward an increased use of GBL. Secondary school teachers also have a tradition of using various media in their teaching and learning activities and there are neither any regulations against an increased use of digital games. An important aspect of history education, where digital games might not the first choice, is in the description of the main changes and influence of a historical époque. Authors’ recommendation is to use games that can enable tangential learning where the gaming sessions could be seen as appetisers for further and deeper learning.

Open access
History and Development of Anaesthesiology (With Resuscitation and Intensive Medicine) in the Republic of Macedonia

Abstract

Aim: To present a chronological overview of the most important events and actors that have marked the history of anaesthesiology and intensive treatment in R. Macedonia since its beginnings in the 1950s.

Method: Retrospective study based on archive materials, published literature and jubilee publications, as well as the memories of individuals who have worked in the field of anaesthesiology in the past period.

Results: Between the two World Wars the first anaesthesia procedures were handled by surgeons. After World War II, the development of anaesthesia in R. Macedonia could be divided into two periods: before 1965 and after 1965. Before 1965 anaesthesia was mainly given by technicians trained on courses, and after this year anaesthesiology was taken over by anaesthesiologists who had specialized at the Faculty of Medicine in Skopje. In 1985 the number of anaesthesiologists was 100, and today it exceeds 250. The most important figures in the history of Macedonian anaesthesiology are: Dr. Risto Ivanovski, who worked from 1954-78, and Prof. Dr. Vladimir Andonov, who worked as an anaesthesiologist from 1965-99. Both of them are doyens who contributed a lot to the development of the anaesthesiology service and education of anaesthesiologists in R. Macedonia. Intensive treatment had started in 1955, but in real terms it has been performed since 1966, when artificial ventilators were introduced. The modern Intensive Care Department was opened at the Surgical Clinic in 1995 and it was followed in other hospitals in the state. The Department of Anaesthesiology has existed since 1975, and it has made a huge contribution to the education of professionals who apply modern principles in emergency medicine and intensive care.

Conclusion: From modest beginnings in the 1950s, anaesthesiology today in R. Macedonia has developed well organized activity that successfully follow the trends of modern medicine in the field of anesthesiology, resuscitation, intensive care and pain treatment.

Open access
in PRILOZI