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Una rassegna bibliografica sui traduttori romeni dell’Inferno (1883-2015): considerazioni di tipo metodologico e deontologico

Abstract

This paper is intended as part of a larger research that aims to the realization of a monographic study dedicated to the Romanian translations of Dante's Inferno, from 19th to 21th century. It is a historical and critical approach, intended as an interdisciplinary study, to be placed at the crossing of disciplines like translation history, translation criticism, reception theory, history of literature, history of literary language, cultural history. The bibliographical selection we propose is complete with some methodological and deontological considerations of utility in the study of the history of translation.

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Shakespow

Abstract

In my paper, I look at the reception of Shakespeare in wartime, under circumstances that challenge and foreground the notion of national borders and territories within Europe. By looking at several Shakespeare cults during the Great War, I seek to illustrate how notions of the nation and of Europe are variable, and with it the concept of “European Shakespeare.”

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Conspiracy Theory as Therapy in Philip Roth’s “The Plot Against America”?

Abstract

By focusing on a passage in Philip Roth’s book, this paper strives to outline how conspiratorial beliefs can have a therapeutic function for the community which has experienced a traumatic event. Fictitious groups depicted in such texts serve as the ultimate causes of humanity’s misgivings: from natural disasters and diseases that plague it to the inherent flaws of political and social systems. Such beliefs, however, are likely to become as dangerous as the cure, a threat Roth hints at in his work. The second part of the paper will look at the viability of conspiracism as a means to address traumatizing issues, in the context of the postmodern condition and the diffusion of motifs until recently present only in the radical texts of popular culture

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Shakespeare’s Cultural Diversity

Abstract

400 hundred years of Shakespeare's presence in world-wide theatres, schools, literature, film, and even languages must give us pause. It is worth reflecting on what there is in the texts that have come down to us that answers this great and obviously most diversified horizon of reception. The paper will try to present Shakespearean plots, characters and themes and examine them for their potential to become appropriated into the very centres of multiple cultural polysystems.

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From Woods and Water to the Gran Bazaar: Images of Romania in English Travelogues after WWI

Abstract

Although globalization brings different countries and cultures in closer and closer contact, people are still sensitive when it comes to aspects such as cultural specificity or ethnicity. The collapse of communism and the extension of the European Union have determined an increase of interest in Romania’s image, both on the part of foreigners and of Romanians themselves. The purpose of this paper is to follow the development of Romania’s image in English travelogues in the last hundred years, its evolution from a land of “woods and water” in the pre-communist era to a “grand bazaar” in the post-communist one, with clear attempts, in recent years, to re-discover a more idyllic picture of the country, one that should encourage ecological tourism. The article is also intended to illustrate the extra-textual (historical, economic, cultural) factors that have impacted, in different ways, on this image evolution.

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Acerca de la metodología en la historia de la traducción. Caso de estudio: las traducciones entre el catalán y el rumano

Abstract

The present paper examines concisely the recent evolution of the history of translation studies, in order to explain a methodology of historical research in this specific area. More exactly, we focus on several key studies on the subject matter, among which are the Sabio Pinilla’s publications (2006). In this respect, we resume the application proposed by the Spanish author, formulated as a series of essential steps for any historical research, using data provided from our Ph.D. thesis in the history of translations between Catalan and Romanian.

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Wallachia and Moldavia as Seen by William Wilkinson, Late British Consul Resident at Bukorest (1820)

Abstract

This article analyzes the way William Wilkinson, a Levant Company member, perceives two Romanian countries situated at the edge of the Ottoman Empire, one of the British Oriental Others, in his An Account of the Principalities of Wallachia and Moldavia with Various Political Observations Relating to Them, published in London in 1820 and written after several years of official residence mainly in Bucharest (1813-1816). Since the book has not been previously analyzed, except for the theme of religion by Professor James Brown, this article proposes to approach it from several different points of view: the author, the Company and the image of the Turks; economic opportunities, prohibition, organization; Romanian history; cities, monuments, travelling system, inhabitants. What this study wishes to demonstrate is that, through both criticism and appreciation, Wilkinson’s book is one of sympathy and mercy towards the Romanian people – a pledge for their freedom.

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Inchbald’S Kotzebue: The Wise Man of the East (1799) and Social Assemblage Theory

Abstract

This article argues that Lord Mansfield's judgement in favour of the actor Charles Macklin in 1775 wrought a profound change on noisy and disruptive theatre auditoriums. Mansfield ruled that persons returning to theatres to repeatedly disrupt performances were guilty of conspiracy and performers' lost earning were assessed as felonies in English common law. Those found guilty might have substantial damages awarded against them and might be liable for a prison sentence. The paper traces that Garrick's Drury Lane was repeatedly disrupted but with no action being taken, even though ringleaders had been identified. Macklin's case, arising from his engagement at Covent Garden, suppressed repeatedly rowdy evenings. The paper suggests that Sarah Siddons's rise at Drury Lane from 1782 onwards was linked to these changes in the legal environment for stage performers.

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Down the Rabbit Hole 11/22/63: Stephen King’s Historical Changeling

Abstract

Once something becomes a story and it is appropriated in some way, that story experiences an additional, altered life. The adaptation might echo the original, but it does so in such a way that the original is forever changed. The original becomes a “changeling.” On a personal level we view events that we have “witnessed” through the lens of our own experiences. This is even true when one revisits the past through fiction. The reader or spectator experiences the past through the lens of the adapter. Stephen King admitted to being emotionally invested in the events surrounding the assassination of President John Fitzgerald Kennedy in 1963, and this emotional investment is reflected in his adaptation. Stephen King’s novel, 11-22-63, and its TV adaptation, serve as compelling examples of how emotional responses to the past can inform their adaptations, alter how their audiences explore and re-visit the past, and demonstrate how history and adaptations become changelings. King’s adaptation additionally demonstrates his ability to integrate the Kennedy assassination back into popular culture, inviting and allowing a “new” younger audience (who were not alive at the time of the assassination) to “experience” history by accompanying his characters down the rabbit hole of history.

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Stories as Silt in Graham Swift’s Waterland

Abstract

The essay analyses Graham Swift’s Waterland and shows that history and identity are subject to a process of reconstruction within stories which evince their author’s power to build on the past based on his vision and cultural experience. We associate the process of recreating the world of the past through stories with the process of recreating a new world through siltation. The same as silt develops land and a new world on the already existing pieces of land reclaimed from water, stories reconstruct history and the past. Both silt and stories reconstruct the past.

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