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Open access

Ayoade Matthew Adetoye, Samuel Ayodele Adewuyi and Dare Akerele

Abstract

The study examined factors determining forest land use decisions among rural farm households in south-western Nigeria. Primary data on socio-economic and community characteristics as well as land use systems were obtained from 300 farm households using a structured questionnaire through a multistage sampling technique. The study revealed that marital status (P < 0.01), gender (P < 0.01), land tenure security (P < 0.01), dominant crop type (P < 0.05), and preference for tree on farm land (P < 0.01) are factors influencing forest land use decision in either agroforestry, pure cultivation or in both practices. Land use choice proportion estimation shows that 63 % are still willing to retain their existing land use practice (pure cultivation). A total of 32 % are willing to shift completely from their existing land use practice while 4 % of the respondents are willing to practice both “agroforestry and pure cultivation” simultaneously. The study therefore suggests the need for a change in forest land use policy, particularly, with a view influence the pattern of use, limitation on type of crop that can be grown, and compliance to sustainable land use practice. This would go a long way in driving forest land use towards agroforestry – a practice identified as a means of ensuring food security while ensuring safe environment.

Open access

Jarosław Bydłosz and Paweł Hanus

Abstract

Municipal spatial planning is one of the key elements of a national spatial policy and the local land use plan is the most important tool for shaping this policy. The local land use plan, as opposed to the study, is a provision of the local law. The study, however, is mandatory for the whole area of the municipality, while the local land use plan is, in principle, voluntary and subject to certain exceptions.

One of the elements which ought to be included in the spatial policy a municipality is taking into account the threats to the safety of its inhabitants and their property, as well as identifying areas of natural geological hazards. Therefore, both the study and the local land use plan of the municipality should include, among others, areas of particular risk related to the subsidence of soil masses, i.e., landslide areas. Landslide areas are of a limited use for investment purposes, including residential, industrial or service development, as particularly vulnerable to the phenomenon of rock masses, eluvium or sediments sliding down slopes under the force of gravity.

The purpose of this article is to analyze the legal and economic consequences resulting from changes to the local land use plan, related to the qualification of an area as a landslide area. This paper examines the changes to the local land use plan for the town of Wieliczka, located place on the border of the Outer Carpathians and the Carpathian Foredeep. The transition from a mountainous terrain into a plane gives rise to numerous natural forms of relief which are prone to landslides. The study of landslides in the municipality of Wieliczka conducted in 2008, resulted in changing the qualifications of many areas to areas at risk of soil subsidence. The effects of the study have been reflected in the new local land use plan introduced in 2010.

Open access

Piotr Dzieszko

Abstract

Last decades of research have revealed the environmental impacts of Land-Use/Cover Change (LUCC) throughout the globe. Human activities’ impact is becoming more and more pronounced on the natural environment. The key activity in the LUCC projects has been to simulate the syntheses of knowledge of LUCC processes, and in particular to advance understanding of the causes of land-cover change. Still, there is a need of developing case studies regional models to understand LUCC change patterns. The aim of this work is to reveal and describe the main changes in LUCC patterns occurring in Poznań Lakeland Mesoregion according to CORINE Land Cover database. Change analysis was the basis for the identification of the main drivers in land cover changes in the study area. The dominant transitions that can be grouped and modelled separately were identified. Each submodel was combined with all submodels in the final change prediction process. Driver variables were used to model the historical change process. Transitions were modelled using multi-layer perceptron (MLP) method. Using the historical rates of change and the transition potential model scenario for year 2006 was predicted. Corine Land Cover 2006 database was used for model validation.

Open access

Peter Rončák, Evelin Lisovszki, Ján Szolgay, Kamila Hlavčová, Silvia Kohnová, Rózsa Csoma and Jana Poórová

Abstract

The effects of land use management practices on surface runoff are evident on a local scale, but evidence of their impact on the scale of a watershed is limited. This study focuses on an analysis of the impact of land use changes on the flood regime in the Myjava River basin, which is located in Western Slovakia. The Myjava River basin has an area of 641.32 km2 and is typified by the formation of fast runoff processes, intensive soil erosion, and muddy floods. The main factors responsible for these problems with flooding and soil erosion are the basin’s location, geology, pedology, agricultural land use, and cropping practices. The GIS-based, spatially distributed WetSpa rainfall-runoff model was used to simulate mean daily discharges in the outlet of the basin as well as the individual components of the water balance. The model was calibrated based on the period between 1997 and 2012 with outstanding results (an NS coefficient of 0.702). Various components of runoff (e.g., surface, interflow and groundwater) and several elements of the hydrological balance (evapotranspiration and soil moisture) were simulated under various land use scenarios. Six land use scenarios (‘crop’, ‘grass’, ‘forest’, ‘slope’, ‘elevation’ and ‘optimal’) were developed. The first three scenarios exhibited the ability of the WetSpa model to simulate runoff under changed land use conditions and enabled a better adjustment of the land use parameters of the model. Three other “more realistic” land use scenarios, which were based on the distribution of land use classes (arable land, grass and forest) regarding permissible slopes in the catchment, confirmed the possibility of reducing surface runoff and maximum discharges with applicable changes in land use and land management. These scenarios represent practical, realistic and realizable land use management solutions and they could be economically implemented to mitigate soil erosion processes and enhance the flood protection measures in the Myjava River basin.

Open access

Ankana

Abstract

Remote sensing and Geographical Information System (GIS) are the most effective tools in spatial data analysis. Natural resources like land, forest and water, these techniques have proved a valuable source of information generation as well as in the management and planning purposes. This study aims to suggest possible land and forest management strategies in Chakia tahsil based on land use and land cover analysis and the changing pattern observed during the last ten years. The population of Chakia tahsil is mainly rural in nature. The study has revealed that the northern part of the region, which offers for the settlement and all the agricultural practices constitutes nearly 23.48% and is a dead level plain, whereas the southern part, which constitute nearly 76.6% of the region is characterized by plateau and is covered with forest. The southern plateau rises abruptly from the northern alluvial plain with a number of escarpments. The contour line of 100 m mainly demarcates the boundary between plateau and plain. The plateau zone is deeply dissected and highly rugged terrain. The resultant topography comprises of a number of mesas and isolated hillocks showing elevation differences from 150 m to 385 m above mean sea level. Being rugged terrain in the southern part, nowadays human encroachment are taking place for more land for the cultivation. The changes were well observed in the land use and land cover in the study region. A large part of fallow land and open forest were converted into cultivated land.

Open access

Daniel Klich, Sylwia Gielarek and Magdalena Antosiewicz

Abstract

The aim of this paper was to indicate the main directions in cover changes and land use in Western Bieszczady Mts. Two areas differing in altitudes, were taken into analysis: part of Bieszczady Wysokie Mts (for years 1852 and 2004) and Baligrod Forest District area (for years 1938 and 1996). Changes in land cover were estimated based on map overlapping, and using indices of changes. Transformations related to almost 40% of Baligrod Forest District area and insignificantly less in Bieszczady Wysokie Mts. Within the study areas, regions with considerable stability and also regions with intensive changes on vast areas appeared. The origin of differences in the land use of both study areas emerged not only from natural changes, but also from historical, social and economic changes.

Open access

Pavel Ondr, Jiří Pečenka, Jakub Polenský and Jiří Ciml

Abstract

The changes in the landscape during past years were affected mainly by political and financial conditions in the agricultural sector as well as the future changes probably will be. For this study various scenarios of changes in land use in the small catchment caused by human activity were simulated. Several scenarios were focused on changes of agricultural area to urbanized landscape and also on industrial use of several plots. The aim of this study was to model and assess the impact of human-induced landscape changes on run-off from small catchments in the traditional agricultural area. It can be said, that more than the change of land use itself, changed management of these areas affects the water run-off more. The hypothetical transfer of significant part of the catchment area or the localities with infiltration vulnerable zones into urbanized paved space is the only exception. This change mainly affects the rate of discharge.

Open access

Petr Komzák and Jiří Kroča

Abstract

Beraeamyia hrabei Mayer, 1937 is a relatively rare species occurring in the Czech Republic only locally and in low abundances. New data on its distribution with some ecological notes are presented in this paper.

Open access

Agnieszka Sosnowska

Abstract

The aim of this article is to establish how land use change influences soil organic matter content in the loess landscape. The research was conducted near Krasnystaw in the Lublin Upland, in forest, on arable land and on abandoned lands at various stages of secondary succession.

During the field research, samples were collected from the upper soil layer and analyzed for organic carbon content, fractional composition of humus compounds and soil reaction. The results obtained indicate that the impact of land use change manifests itself in a change of the soil reaction, which turns from neutral or slightly acid into acid. The tillage system reduces organic matter in the soil and increases the humic acids ratio, whereas abandonment of the land causes an evident increase in the soil’s organic matter content and the fulvic acids ratio. These results allow us to state that land use change has a rapid impact on the geochemical properties of the landscape (which can be noticed as soon as 5 years after the land is abandoned).

Open access

T. Bubová, M. Kulma, D. Koleška and V. Vrabec

Abstract

In the second half of the 20th century, change of land use in the name of intensive agriculture was one of the most important factors caused significant loss of butterfly diversity in Europe. Phengaris nausithous and Phengaris teleius belong among the flagship species associated with wet meadows and are directly threatened by the intensive agriculture practises or management abandonment. Due to their very specific lifecycle, they are closely linked to their habitats and appropriate mowing management on their patches is thus crucial for their survival. Our research took place in Dolní Labe, Děčín, Czech Republic, on 16 patches and has been performed using Mark-Release-Recapture since 2009. This paper will illustrate how intensive mowing management, applied on only one of the patches, which forms only 9.4% of total locality size, can influence the entire local Phengaris metapopulation. The selected patch was intentionally mowed in the middle of flight season annually for four years. Even though, no significant effect was identified after the first year of study, after the second and third seasons, there was evidence of population decline of both studied species.