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María Mar Delgado-Serrano and José Ángel Hurtado-Martos

Abstract

Land is an essential resource and plays a vital role in providing food and food security, water, ecosystem services and territorial resilience. However, the past few decades have generated enormous and increasingly unsustainable pressures on land use. The objective of this research is to analyse the main land use changes in Spain between 1987 and 2011 using data provided by the Corine Land Cover (CLC) project. The general trends in land use change at CLC level 1 in this period, and more specifically the changes occurring at CLC level 3 in land destined for agricultural use are analysed. The main reasons that explain these changes, including policy influences, are then identified. The results show that the area occupied by buildings and infrastructure has doubled, agricultural land has decreased and irrigated land has increased; forested areas have also increased, but their ecological quality has been degraded. These trends question the future sustainability of that land use in the analysed period.

Open access

Ndidzulafhi Innocent Sinthumule

Abstract

Transfrontier Conservation Areas (TFCAs) have recently emerged as the 21st century approach to managing protected areas in southern Africa. Unlike national parks and other protected areas that place emphasis only on the protection of plant and animal species within their borders, transfrontier conservation areas promote conservation beyond the borders of protected areas. Consequently, this mega-conservation initiative encourage multiple land-use practices with the purpose of improving rural livelihoods whilst promoting biodiversity conservation. Thus, land parcels under different forms of tenure are brought together into a common nature conservation project. This study argues that the integration of various land-use practices within one area benefits conservation goals at the expense of local communities and irrigation farmers. To substantiate this argument, the study draws on fieldwork material collected in the Greater Mapungubwe Transfrontier Conservation Area spanning parts of Botswana, South Africa and Zimbabwe. The study concludes that multiple-land use practices in transfrontier conservation areas is only promoted by wildlife managers to gain access to extra land.

Open access

Tajuddin, Supratman, Darmawan Salman, Yusran Yusran and Muhammad Alif K. Sahide

Abstract

In the past few decades, forest policies have caused changes in forest landscape and community lifescape in the study area of Walanae Forest Management Unit (KPH Walanae), South Sulawesi Province. This research aims to analyze forest policy dynamics and their impacts on landscape and lifescape dynamics. We quantify landscape dynamics using land use and land cover change and landscape metrics in interpreting remote sensing results of four data sets obtained in 1990, 2000, 2009, and 2016. Furthermore, we investigate lifescape dynamics using qualitative/quantitative description. We found a rapid land use change in forest landscapes within the past 26 years. A significant change showed that, in 1990–2000, the primary forest that changed into the secondary forest and shrubs has changed into dry land agriculture mix shrubs. The decreased area of the forest brought an increase in economic income for people on one side and large disturbances and forest fragmentation on the other. Various forest policies influenced the forest composition and cover but were insufficiently successful in protecting the natural forest. Results showed that several forest policies that considerably impact the landscape and lifescape conditions include forest land designation, industrial forest plantation, and restoration activities. The policies on establishing KPH and social forest program have not shown the maximum result on the landscape and lifescape improvements and, therefore, must be supported.

Open access

Piotr Werner, Piotr Korcelli and Elżbieta Kozubek

Abstract

Land use is defined as a spatial distribution of individual forms of land cover patches, utilised or not utilised by humans within the framework of mutual and spatial relationships. It refers to the functional character of a given terrain, and is also identified with a socio-economic description of the land surface. Changes in land use can be interpreted as a complex and, to some extent, a random process. These assumptions serve as a point of departure in an attempt to evaluate spatial and temporal differences in land use changes in the metropolitan areas of Poland, using the entropy formula. The analysis focuses on population development as a factor that impacts upon land use change. The approach proposed here allows us to study land use dynamics in detail, with the help of cartographic visualisation.

Open access

Linda Kauškale and Ineta Geipele

Abstract

The research focus is the examination of key aspects of the land use for the detection of urgent problems in the context of sustainable development. The comparison, data analysis and logical access methods have been used in the study, and the recommendations on the improvement of the situation in the longer term have been developed. Land use management, legal side of regulation and the efficiency of land use are essential guidelines for the sustainable development of the territory in the country.

Open access

Jarosław Bydłosz and Paweł Hanus

Abstract

Municipal spatial planning is one of the key elements of a national spatial policy and the local land use plan is the most important tool for shaping this policy. The local land use plan, as opposed to the study, is a provision of the local law. The study, however, is mandatory for the whole area of the municipality, while the local land use plan is, in principle, voluntary and subject to certain exceptions.

One of the elements which ought to be included in the spatial policy a municipality is taking into account the threats to the safety of its inhabitants and their property, as well as identifying areas of natural geological hazards. Therefore, both the study and the local land use plan of the municipality should include, among others, areas of particular risk related to the subsidence of soil masses, i.e., landslide areas. Landslide areas are of a limited use for investment purposes, including residential, industrial or service development, as particularly vulnerable to the phenomenon of rock masses, eluvium or sediments sliding down slopes under the force of gravity.

The purpose of this article is to analyze the legal and economic consequences resulting from changes to the local land use plan, related to the qualification of an area as a landslide area. This paper examines the changes to the local land use plan for the town of Wieliczka, located place on the border of the Outer Carpathians and the Carpathian Foredeep. The transition from a mountainous terrain into a plane gives rise to numerous natural forms of relief which are prone to landslides. The study of landslides in the municipality of Wieliczka conducted in 2008, resulted in changing the qualifications of many areas to areas at risk of soil subsidence. The effects of the study have been reflected in the new local land use plan introduced in 2010.

Open access

Himmat Singh, Robin Marwal, Anusha Mishra and Karam Vir Singh

Abstract

The breeding of Culex (Lutzia) fuscanus WIEDEMAN was recorded during entomological surveys in Jodhpur, Bikaner, Jaisalmer and Bikaner. A detailed study of its biology has been carried out with reference to seasonal variation and breeding. Stable breeding populations of Culex fuscanus, a mosquito whose larvae are predacious and feed on other mosquito larvae, were found at seven localities in Jodhpur. Its larvae were found breeding in association with Anopheles, Aedes and Culex species in outdoor cemented tanks, mostly in the shade of trees. This is the first report of this species from the desert district of western Rajasthan.

Open access

Andrzej Misztal and Marcin Kuczera

The impact of land use on the water quality of foothill microcatchment areas

The impact of land use on the water quality of foothill microcatchment areas. In this paper a comparison is made between the impact of land use methods on the quality of water in the streams which drain various catchment areas. For this purpose three microcatchments were selected which are located in agricultural, rural settlements, and forested areas. Water samples were physically and chemically analysed in order to determine: nitrates, nitrites, ammonia, phosphates, sulphates, chlorides, calcium, magnesium, dissolved oxygen, reaction and conductivity. The above studies were conducted in the 2006 and 2007. Our analysis of the collected materials allows us to affirm that land use methods have a significant impact on the water quality of the streams which drain the area. Rural settlement has the most negative influence on the water quality, followed by typical agricultural use. Based on the direct quality evaluations of single water samples, it has been found that only water from forested areas can be qualified as belonging to the 1st cleanness class.

Open access

Agnieszka Józefowska and Anna Miechówka

Abstract

The number of soil mesofauna and enzymatic activity of soils are good indicators of changes in soil influenced by cultivation. The aim of this study was to compare density of enchytraeids and the activity of dehydrogenases (ADh), urease (AU), and invertase (AI) in the soils of grassland and arable land. Relationships that exist between those biological parameters and the basic soil properties (the content of total organic carbon (TOC) and nitrogen (TN), pH, texture, and total porosity) were defined. In the research, soil material from humus horizon of 12 soils which were located in the Mały Beskid and Silesian Foothills (S Poland) was used. The main density of enchytraeids in grassland soils (12 982 ind⋅m-2) was twice higher than in arable land soils (6099 ind⋅m-2), and the differences were statistically significant. Grassland soils were characterised by higher enzymatic activity than arable land soils. However, only ADh, which were almost three times higher in grassland than in arable soils (2024 and 742 μmol TPFkg-1h-1, respectively), showed significant differences. In grassland soils more favourable edaphic conditions for the development of soil organisms occurred in comparison with arable land.

Open access

Ayoade Matthew Adetoye, Samuel Ayodele Adewuyi and Dare Akerele

Abstract

The study examined factors determining forest land use decisions among rural farm households in south-western Nigeria. Primary data on socio-economic and community characteristics as well as land use systems were obtained from 300 farm households using a structured questionnaire through a multistage sampling technique. The study revealed that marital status (P < 0.01), gender (P < 0.01), land tenure security (P < 0.01), dominant crop type (P < 0.05), and preference for tree on farm land (P < 0.01) are factors influencing forest land use decision in either agroforestry, pure cultivation or in both practices. Land use choice proportion estimation shows that 63 % are still willing to retain their existing land use practice (pure cultivation). A total of 32 % are willing to shift completely from their existing land use practice while 4 % of the respondents are willing to practice both “agroforestry and pure cultivation” simultaneously. The study therefore suggests the need for a change in forest land use policy, particularly, with a view influence the pattern of use, limitation on type of crop that can be grown, and compliance to sustainable land use practice. This would go a long way in driving forest land use towards agroforestry – a practice identified as a means of ensuring food security while ensuring safe environment.