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  • Author: Zsuzsanna Ajtony x
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Approaching Literature with Linguistic Means: a Few Conclusions

Abstract

This paper is a follow-up of my research carried out on the interface area of language and literature, summarizing the conclusions that can be drawn from the approach of literary works with linguistic means. In my research I have analysed the dramatic works of G. B. Shaw with the help of the latest results of interactional sociolinguistics. After a thorough examination of the Shavian characters’ verbal interaction focusing on the relevance of ethnic features (Britishness, for instance), this article discusses the legitimacy of linguistic methods in the interpretation of literary works.

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Cultural Interchangeability? Culture-Specific Items in Translation

Abstract

This paper summarizes the results of the translation work carried out within an international project aiming to develop the language skills of staff working in hotel and catering services. As the topics touched upon in the English source texts are related to several European cultures, these cultural differences bring about several challenges related to the translation of realia, or culture-specific items (CSIs). In the first part of the paper, a series of translation strategies for rendering source-language CSIs into the target language are enlisted, while the second part presents the main strategies employed in the prepared translations.

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Dilemmas of Cultural Mediation: A Case Study of Tourism

Abstract

Travelling implies the encounter and, in certain cases, the clash of cultures. By interpreting translation as a means of transfer between languages and cultures, the present study looks into the different views on translating culture-specific realia. Through a close analysis of texts with the purpose of informing foreign tourists it offers ways of how to carry out this mediation. The study calls for further research into closely related issues, such as the translator’s cultural awareness of and sensitivity to similarity and difference, identity and alterity in culture.

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Translation of Irony in the Hungarian Subtitles of Downton Abbey

Abstract

This paper proposes to analyse ironic utterances in the British TV series Downton Abbey (Season One) by comparing the English source text (ST) irony found in the script of the film to its subtitled variant of the Hungarian target text (TT). First the literature of the domain is surveyed in order to draw attention to the difficulty of rendering irony in audiovisual subtitles which emphasises that, as a multidisciplinary area, it involves not only audio and visual, but also verbal and non-verbal factors. This section is followed by a brief survey of irony theories highlighting the incongruence factor of irony, which also needs to be rendered in the TT After offering an outline of the story, several examples of ironic utterances are discussed, applying the dynamic equivalence method.

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Taming the Stranger: Domestication vs Foreignization in Literary Translation

Abstract

The translator’s task is to bridge the gap between the source text (ST) and the target text (TT), to mediate between the source culture (SC) and the target culture (TC). Cultural mediation is always more than linguistic mediation: it facilitates understanding between cultures. Cultural mediators need to be extremely aware of their own cultural identity, understanding how their own culture influences perception (ethnocentric attitude). While foreignization introduces the TT audience to the ST culture as much as possible, making the foreign visible, domestication brings two languages and two cultures closer, minimizing the foreignness of the TT, conforming to the TC values, and making the unfamiliar accessible (Venuti 1995, Munday 2016). This paper investigates different ways to find the balance between these two tendencies, offering examples from literary translation.

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The Effective and/or the Reasonable: Border Crossing in Strategic Maneuvering

Abstract

The main aim of an argumentative speech act complex, as defined in argumentation theory, is to resolve a difference of opinion by advancing a constellation of reasons brought up by the arguer in order to justify the acceptability of a standpoint. In order to achieve one’s goal, the arguer is entitled to employ strategic maneuvering, a process through which a balance between reasonableness and effectiveness is to be established, and the aim of which is to move towards the best position in the actual context of argumentation. A prototypical example of applying strategic maneuvering is that of political speeches where speakers frequently achieve their goals by the rhetorical means of persuasion and manipulation, by misleading language use. The speaker’s orientation towards finding the best position will be followed through the analysis of dialogues taken from the TV series House of Cards.

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