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Károly Rédei, Imre Csiha, Zsolt Keserű and János Gál

Abstract

- Black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) is one of the most important forest tree species in Hungary, covering approximately 23% of the forested land and providing 25% of the annual timber output of the country. One third of these black locust stands are high forests (planted with seedlings) and the remainder coppices. According to the forestry regulations black locust stands can be regenerated both by root suckers and with seedlings in Hungary. This study investigates the influence of different regeneration methods on wood production, stem quality and health. Properly managed regeneration from root suckers produced a higher yield than regeneration from seedlings at a harvest age of 35-37 years. The results show that regeneration of black locust stands from root suckers can be recommended on good and medium quality sites without a decrease in yield or stem quality.

Open access

Zsolt Keserű, Ildikó Balla, Borbála Antal and Károly Rédei

Abstract

Leuce-poplars are a native stand-forming tree species throughout Hungary. Several species or selections of them are used as ornamental plants in parks or to line streets and highways. They cover approximately 4.0 per cent of the total forested area in Hungary (70000 ha). The white (grey) poplar belongs to the Leuce poplars and plays a significant role in sand fixation, regional forestation, and nature conservation. The National Agricultural Research and Innovation Centre, Forest Research Institute or NARIC-FRI (formerly known as the Forest Research Institute) is involved in long-term breeding work for the selection of fast-growing white poplar trees under dry conditions. In vitro multiplication of trees is applied mainly to fruit growing trees in Hungary; in forestry research it is used primarily for selective breeding. This paper presents a short overview of the most important issues concerning the biotechnology of different Populus species, the related research on micropropagation trials, and the results of field investigations of micropropagated Leuce-poplar clone experiments.

Open access

Károly Rédei, János Gál, Zsolt Keserű and Borbála Antal

Abstract

The increasing demand for forest products, diminishing forest land areas, and general concern about the long-term effects of deforestation have increased the need for multipurpose tree species with rapid growth rates. Consequently, information on renewable energy resources is becoming increasingly crucial, and forest biomass determination is becoming a significant part of forestry. Black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) is a fast growing, nitrogen fixing, stress tolerant species with durable and high quality wood that can be used for many purposes including wall panelling; vine props; furniture; pulp and paper; animal feed stock; bee forage; and biomass energy. This article presents the above-ground biomass of black locust, both for individual trees and for stands. Information concerning wet and absolute dry wood for stem, merchantable (d1.3 > 5 cm) and small (d 1.3 < 5 cm) wood, and for other tree parts (foliage, bark) for individual trees and for black locust stands are detailed in dendromass tables by six yield classes.

Open access

Károly Rédei, Zsolt Keserű, Imre Csiha, János Rásó, Ágnes Kamandiné Végh and Borbála Antal

Abstract -

In Hungary black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) is considered as an important exotic stand-forming tree species growing mostly under unfavourable ecological conditions for forest management. Due to climate change effects its importance is increasing in many other countries, too. As a result of a selection programme new black locust clones were tested in clone trials. Juvenile growth and the morphological as well as phenological traits of four micropropagated black locust clones were evaluated in central Hungary under dry site conditions. Significant differences (P<5%) were found for DBH and field survival rate values. At age of 7 the clone R.p. ‘Bácska’ (’KH 56A 2/5’) appears to be especially promising for mass propagation. Tissue culture can be considered as a suitable tool for propagating superior individuals and offers new prospects for the rapid cloning of selected genotypes used for plantation forestry.