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Open access

Péter Csáfordi, Andrea Pődör, Jan Bug and Zoltán Gribovsyki

Abstract

- To implement the analysis of soil erosion with the USLE in a GIS environment, a new workflow has been developed with the ArcGIS Model Builder. The aim of this four-part framework is to accelerate data processing and to ensure comparability of soil erosion risk maps. The first submodel generates the stream network with connected catchments, computes slope conditions and the LS factor in USLE based on the DEM. The second submodel integrates stream lines, roads, catchment boundaries, land cover, land use, and soil maps. This combined dataset is the basis for the preparation of other USLE-factors. The third submodel estimates soil loss, and creates zonal statistics of soil erosion. The fourth submodel classifies soil loss into categories enabling the comparison of modelled and observed soil erosion. The framework was applied in a small forested catchment in Hungary. Although there is significant deviation between the erosion of different land covers, the predicted specific soil loss does not increase above the tolerance limit in any area unit. The predicted surface soil erosion in forest subcompartments mostly depends on the slope conditions.

Open access

Edit Nagy Pintérné and Zoltán Pödör

Abstract

We examined the light sources and illuminated environments in Sopron’s public areas and studied the impact they had on the composition of macrolepidopteran moth communities. We employed light traps with three different light sources in three differently illuminated environments (seminatural, transitional, urban) on 60 occasions during the summer period of 2012-2013 and 20 times in the seminatural area in the spring and autumn of 2014. In the first two years, we evaluated the number of individuals; in year three, we evaluated the number of species. In the first two years, the high-pressure sodium light in the seminatural site trapped the largest number of nocturnal lepidopteran specimens (2,569), while the mixed HMLI light trapped the most individuals in the transitional (1,098) and urban (822) areas. Based on the average number of individuals the first two years, we compared the locations and light sources. In terms of average number of specimens collected, significant differences emerged between two light sources and two locations. When we completed the species diversity index, we determined the compact fluorescent tube in spring and the high-pressure sodium light in the autumn showed the greatest values.

Open access

György Csóka, Zoltán Pödör, Gyula Nagy and Anikó Hirka

Abstract

We investigated the canopy recovery of 3 tree species (pedunculate oak, Turkey oak, European beech) at two locations in the Veszprém county (Western Hungary) after severe defoliation by gypsy moth caterpillars in the spring of 2005. The Turkey oak has evidently the best recovery potential, and it almost completely replaced the lost foliage in 4 months. The pedunculate oak and beech needed 2 years to reach the same level of recovery. The pedunculate oak suffered from a heavy infection of Microsphaera alphitoides after defoliation and it probably slowed down its recovery. Neither the presence of Agrilus biguttatus in the oak plot nor the appearance of Agrilus viridis in the beech plot was observed during the study period. Population density of the buprestid Coraebus floerentinus showed a considerable increase in the oak plot, but remained under the damage level. Neither other harmful appearance of other pests nor significant tree mortality were observed within 4 years from the defoliation. These results provide information for the evaluation of longer term influences of the gypsy moth defoliation and may support the decisions concerning pest control.