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  • Author: Zane Dzirkale x
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Open access

Šimons Svirskis, Linda Klimavičiusa and Zane Dzirkale

Abstract

Search of new approaches for harmless, non-medication treatment of body dysfunctions is still on the agenda of vet and human practitioners and researchers as well. This study presents evaluation of the effect of “Stress Relief” dietary supplement (SR) on mice behaviour under different acute short-term stress conditions and treatment duration. Five experiments were performed and in each 40 animals were randomly split into four (I–IV) groups, where I and II — non-stressed mice, III and IV — stressed animals, I and III received water with trace mineral solution (TMS), II and IV received water with SR. As stress factors, forced swimming, rodent predator odour or both together were applied. Locomotor activity under normal and stress conditions in Open Field were observed and measured by a SMART video-tracking system. Blood glucose level was measured as well. SR showed a reversal of stress-decreased locomotor activity in all stress models — distance walked increased almost twice (p < 0.0001), central zone crossings and time spent in it were 2–4 times greater than in the control group (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0002, respectively), and fast movement episodes and maximal speed increased by 50–200%. In addition, complete normalisation of stress-induced elevation of blood glucose level (p < 0.0001) was noted. These results demonstrate for the first time that the effect of “Stress Relief” formula (water additives–minerals processed by know-how way in Vital Force Technology using Dr. Yury Kronn method) can be observed in laboratory animals, and that the effects are significant and repeatable. SR shows fear- and stress-reducing activity, which does not sufficiently differ between 7-, 9-, 14-, 28- and 32-day treatment regimes.

Open access

Baiba Jansone, Zane Dzirkale, Kaspars Jekabsons, Vladimirs Pilipenko, Ulrika Beitnere, Ingrīda Māgure, Raimonds Skumbiņš, Uģis Klētnieks, Ilona Vanaga, Ruta Muceniece and Vija Kluša

Abstract

Polyprenols (PPs) have been identified in almost all living organisms. The richest source of PPs is the needles of conifer trees. Endogenously, PPs, similarly to cholesterol, are synthesised in human and animal cells via the mevalonate pathway. Previous studies have demonstrated the anti-oxidant properties of PPs. To our knowledge, no studies have been published on the influence of PPs on muscle strength. We hypothesised that administration of PPs could prevent changes in muscle functioning caused by statins (weakness, etc.). In the present study, atorvastatin (80 mg/kg) was used as a model compound. PPs at doses 1, 10 and 20 mg/kg were administered. Both drugs were given per os for 16 days. The influence of atorvastatin, PPs and their combination on behaviour, muscle strength, plasma cholesterol and creatine kinase activity was assessed in female Wistar rats. Our data demonstrated that atorvastatin considerably impaired muscle strength, whereas PPs protected that effect. Neither PPs, nor atorvastatin influenced plasma cholesterol levels, whereas PPs at dose 20 mg/kg elevated creatine kinase activity by about 25%. PPs at the tested doses did not alter behaviour, indicating safety of central nervous system functions. The obtained data suggest usefulness of PPs as a complement in statin therapy to reduce muscle-related side effects.