Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author: Vorasuk Shotelersuk x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

Pongsathorn Chaiyasap, Chalurmpon Srichomthong, Siraprapa Tongkobpetch, Kanya Suphapeetiporn and Vorasuk Shotelersuk

Abstract

Background

Hearing loss is among the most frequent sensory disorders. Preventable causes include medications given to genetically susceptible individuals. Several families around the world with an A1555G mitochondrial mutation who became profoundly deaf after receiving aminoglycosides have been described. However, none has been reported in Thailand.

Objectives

To identify the cause of hearing loss of a large Thai family with 11 members who reportedly turned deaf after receiving antibiotics.

Methods

We obtained blood samples from 5 members; 4 of whom had hearing loss. Mutation analyses were performed using molecular techniques including polymerase chain reaction, Sanger sequencing, and restriction fragment length polymorphism.

Results

All 4 affected members were found to harbor the same A1555G mitochondrial mutation, while the unaffected had only the wild-type A.

Conclusions

We have identified the mitochondrial mutation leading to aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss in a Thai population. Raising awareness for medical practitioners of this genetic susceptibility in Thailand is warranted. Avoidance of certain medications in these individuals would prevent this acquired permanent hearing loss.

Open access

Rungnapa Ittiwut, Pichit Siriwan, Kanya Suphapeetiporn and Vorasuk Shotelersuk

Abstract

Background

Oral clefts, including cleft lip (CL), CL with cleft palate (CL/CP), and cleft palate only (CPO), are among the most common birth defects, and if left untreated can cause significant morbidity. Causes are complex and involve both genetic and environmental factors. Several studies have demonstrated the highest prevalence of oral clefts being in Asian, white, and African populations. However, there have been very few epidemiological studies of oral clefts in Thais.

Objectives

To describe the epidemiology and factors associated with oral clefts in Thais.

Methods

This retrospective case-control observational study included individuals from numerous regions in Thailand. We reviewed data regarding 784 patients with an oral cleft collected in questionnaires as part of the Thai nationwide Smart Smile and Speech Project from 2006 to 2014. Data regarding patients with oral clefts were analyzed, and compared with data regarding 187 unaffected controls.

Results

Of 784 cases, CL/CP accounted for 59.8%, CPO 21.9%, and CL 18.3%. A family history of oral clefts was detected in all 3 types (P < 0.001). Maternal use of any drugs or herbal medicine not prescribed by physicians during pregnancy in cases of CPO (P = 0.049) and maternal consumption of alcohol during pregnancy in cases of CL/CP (P = 0.047) were significantly higher than that by mothers of controls.

Conclusions

CL/CP is the most common type of oral cleft. A family history of oral clefts, and maternal consumption of alcohol or nonprescribed drugs are positively associated with oral clefts in Thais.

Open access

Paravee Katavetin, Sathida Poonmaksatit, Pairatch Prasongchin, Supatporn Tepmongkol, Kanya Suphapeetiporn and Vorasuk Shotelersuk

Abstract

Background: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inherited connective tissue disorder with defective bone quality leading to increased bone fragility and low bone mass. Menatetrenone has been shown to reduce bone mineral density (BMD) loss as well as the incidence of fractures in patients with osteoporosis.

Objectives: We investigated the effects of menatetrenone in five prepubertal children with OI.

Methods: All patients had been treated with intravenous pamidronate for four to 42 months prior to enrollment in this study. Pamidronate was discontinued at least two months before starting 15 milligrams per day of oral menatetrenone. Menatetrenone was given for 12 months. BMD was measured at baseline and one year after menatetrenone treatment.

Results: During one year of menatetrenone treatment, the incidence of fractures was 1.0 (0.0-2.0) times/year, which was not significantly different from the fracture rate of 1.2 (0.0-1.5) times/year during pamidronate treatment. However, it significantly decreased compared with the fracture rate of 10.4 (2.7-47.6) times/year before pamidronate treatment (P=0.043). After one year of menatetrenone, BMD of lumbar spine and left hip significantly increased in three and two patients, respectively. However, one patient showed a significant decrease in BMD in both regions. Noteworthy, none of the patients developed adverse side effects during menatetrenone treatment.

Conclusions: One-year menatetrenone could maintain the decreased fracture rate of intravenous pamidronate in prepubertal OI patients. No adverse effects were observed. Larger and longer studies to determine the benefit of oral menatetrenone as adjunctive treatment in OI patients are warranted.