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  • Author: Vesna Durnev x
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Hemodynamic and Bispectral Changes During Pin Insertion in Craniotomy – Effect of Locally Infiltrated Bupivacaine

Abstract

Introduction Cranial pins insertion is a method for head stabilization and together with the scalp incision is one of the biggest noxious stimulus associated with arousal and rapid increase of the blood pressure leading to pathological increase of the intracranial pressure. The aim of this investigation is to study the superiority of the locally infiltrated anesthetic bupivacaine just before the skull pin insertion and the scalp incision in craniotomy under general anesthesia.

Methods In the study thirty patients of both genders aged 24-72 years were included. They were categorized as ASA 1 and 2 and divided into two group of 15 patients each, group B (bupivacaine) and group S (saline). We recorded the bispectral (BIS) index, the mean arterial pressure (MAP) and the pulse rate (PR) in five time intervals: t 0-2 min before pin insertion; t 1-2 min after pin insertion; t 2-5 min after; t 3-10 min after and t 4-15 min after.

Results Significant difference p<0.05 was achieved in group S for all three followed parameters: blood pressure, heart rate and bispectral index. The difference is present in all four time intervals compared to the initial one before the pin insertion. With further analysis it was demonstrated that the investigated BIS index participates the most in the overall significance in group F.

Conclusion The scalp infiltration with local anesthetic bupivacaine results with stable hemodynamic parameters and stable intracranial pressure during the painful procedures as craniotomy.

Open access
in PRILOZI
Continuous Femoral Nerve Block Versus Fascia Iliaca Compartment Block as Postoperative Analgesia in Patients with Hip Fracture

Abstract

Introduction: Systemic postoperative analgesia is inefficient in most patients with hip fracture, which is the reason for pain, especially during leg movement. Peripheral and plexus nerve blocks are an efficient option for postoperative pain relief.

The aim of this study was to compare the effect and duration of continuous FNB versus a single FIC block as a postoperative analgesia in patients with hip fracture.

Methods: Sixty patients with hip fracture were included and were randomly assigned to two groups of 30 patients: FNB group – patients with continuous femoral nerve block; and FIC group –patients with a single fascia iliaca compartment block. In all patients, pain intensity was measured at rest and in passive leg movement by using VDS (0–4) at several intervals: 1, 2, 12, 24, 36 and 48 hours after intervention. The amount of supplemental analgesia was measured, together with the time when the patient needed it for the first time, as well as the side effects.

Results: The values of VDS were significantly lower in patients with FNB block versus patients with FIC block in rest and movement at the 24-hour intervals (46.67% vs 0% felt moderate pain), after 36 hours (43.33% vs 0% felt moderate pain) and 48 hours after intervention (46.67% vs 3.33% felt moderate to severe pain) for p < 0.05. Patients with FNB block received a significantly lower amount of supplemental analgesia, 23.3% of the FNB group vs 50% of the FIC group (p < 0.05). Registered side effects were were nausea, dizziness and sedation, and they were statistically significantly more frequent in the FIC group (p < 0.05).

Conclusion: Pain relief in the postoperative period was superior in the FNB group versus the FIC group at rest and in movement in patients with hip fracture.

Open access
in PRILOZI
Pediatric enigma in ICU – late treatment of severe sepsis: a case report

Abstract

A surgery of ritual circumcision in healthy young boys is usually a safe procedure. However, an outbreak of severe sepsis a few hours after surgery in patients who underwent this minor procedure is described and analyzed in this report. We describe the clinical course and discuss the causes of the sepsis and septic shock. Contamination of propofol, the intravenous anesthetic agent, was suspected as a probable cause. However, the most important question that had appeared from this case is the prognostic outcome regarding the delayed treatment of severe sepsis

Open access
Effect of Adding Dexamethasone as a Ropivacaine Adjuvant in Ultrasound-Guided Transversus Abdominis Plane Block for Inguinal Hernia Repair

Abstract

Background: The transverses abdominals plane block (TAP) is a regional anesthesia technique that provided analgesia to the parietal peritoneum, skin and muscles of the anterior abdominal wall. The aim of this randomized double-blind study was to evaluate postoperative analgesia on patients undergoing open inguinal hernia repair under general anesthesia (GA), (GA + TAP) block preformed with ropivacaine and (GA + TAP-D) block preformed with ropivacaine and 4 mg dexamethasone.

Methods: 90 (ASA I-II) adult patients for unilateral open inguinal hernia repair were included in this study. In group I (n = 30) patents received only general anesthesia (GA). Patients in group II (n = 30) received GA and unilateral TAP block with 25 ml of 0.5% ropivacaine and the patients in group III (n = 30) received GA and unilateral TAP-D block with 25 ml of 0.5% ropivacaine + 4 mg Dexamethadsone. In this study we assessed the pain score - VAS at rest at 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 hours after the operation and the total analgesic consumption of morphine over 24 hours.

Results: There were statistically significant differences in the VAS scores between group I, group II and group III at all postoperative time points - 2hr, 4hr, 6hr, 12hr and 24hr. (p < 0.00001). The cumulative 24 hours morphine consumption after the operation was significantly lower in group III (5.53 1.21 mg) than in group II (6.16 2.41 mg) and group I (9.26 2.41 mg). This difference is statistically significant (p < 0.00001).

Conclusion: Concerning the inguinal hernia repair we found better postoperative pain scores and 24 hours reduction of the morphine consumption in group III (GA and TAP-D block) compared with group I (GA) and group II (GA + TAP block).

Open access
in PRILOZI