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Open access

Sonja Prćić, Verica Đuran and Dragan Katanić

Abstract

Vitiligo is an acquired, often hereditary skin depigmentation disorder, characterized by discrete, well-circumscribed, chalk-white macules or patches. It affects all age groups, but in more than half of the patients it occurs before the age of twenty, when self-image is being formed and social acceptance is of great importance. Although similar to the disease in adults, vitiligo in children and adolescents does have differences in epidemiology, association with other endocrine and/or autoimmune disorders, and treatment. This is a review of vitiligo in the pediatric population, emphasizing key differences with vitiligo in adults. According to the literature reports, we suggest that children and adolescents with vitiligo, especially non-segmental type, should perform annual screening for thyroid dysfunction, particularly for parameters of autoimmune thyroiditis.

Open access

Milica Subotić and Verica Đuran

Abstract

Acne vulgaris is a common skin disease, which affects individuals of all races and ages. In Caucasians, almost 85% of individuals between 12 and 25 years, as well as 25% of adults, are affected with some forms of acne. The pathophysiology of acne is multifactorial, and thus, the treatment must cover all the possible causes of acne. For this reason, acne therapy is mostly a combination therapy, with the main goal to achieve clinical improvement, without scarring and residuals, as much as possible. The treatment should be planned individually, depending on the clinical appearance, severity and psychological profile of the patient. The treatment usually takes time and requires dedication and patience of both the patient and the physician.

Open access

Milan Matić, Verica Đuran, Marina Jovanović, Zorica Gajinov, Aleksandra Matić, Branislav Đuran, Boža Pal and Neda Mimica-Dukić

Abstract

Traditional medicine credits yarrow (Achillea millefolium) with the ability to accelerate wound healing. The purpose of this research was to determine the effects of yarrow on the epithelization of the lower leg venous ulcers. The study included 39 patients with venous leg ulcers. They were divided into two groups: the first (experimental) group of patients were treated with an ointment containing 7.5% of yarrow extract. In the second (control) group, saline solution dressings were applied to ulcers, within the period of three weeks. In the experimental group, at the beginning of the therapy, the total surface of all the ulcers was 44736 mm2. After three weeks, the total surface of all the ulcers was 27000 mm2 (a decrease of 39.64%). In the control group, at the beginning of the therapy, the total surface of all the ulcers was 46116 mm2. At the end of the study (21 days) the total surface of all the ulcers was 39153 mm2 (a decrease of 15.1%). Herbal preparations are suitable for application in the therapy of venous ulcers, but their efficiency in wound healing is still to be investigated.

Open access

Zorica Gajinov, Milan Matić, Sonja Prćić and Verica Đuran

Abstract

Visual perception of human skin is determined by the light that reflects off the skin surface to retina and interpretation of these information by visual centers in the brain cortex. Skin has a partly translucent and turbid structure and visual perceptions depend on interactions between the light and structures of the skin surface and below it, through absorption, reflection and scattering. Light absorption by the skin depends on the composition, absorption spectra and amount (volume fraction) of chromophores. Subsurface scattering occurs within the skin layers: Rayleigh scattering (subcellular structures sized up to 1/10 of incident wavelength) and Mie scattering (collagen, melanosomes). Due to fluctuations of the refractive index within tissue components and intense scattering, the spatial distribution of light within the skin is diffuse. Skin images are created by the light that reflects off the skin after being color-modified by absorption and being scattered on the skin surface and internal skin structures.

Open access

Sonja Prćić, Verica Đuran, Zorica Gajinov, Matild Čeke, Jelena Tomić, Gordana Vijatov and Mirjana Anđelić

Abstract

Nodular forms of mastocytosis are rather rare skin diseases, especially when localized on the vulva. A 9-year-old girl presented with urticaria pigmentosa type lesions since her 4th year, associated with several solitary or confluent vulvar nodules, varying in size from a pea to a walnut, and mild systemic symptoms. Diagnosis of mastocytosis was confirmed by histology, and apart from splenomegaly, no signs of systemic spread or associated hematologic disorders were detected. Therapeutic response of nodular lesions was rather poor, and further follow up is necessary.