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Negar Aghaali, Mohammad Ghadamyari, Vahid Hosseininaveh and Nasir Saberi Riseh

Abstract

Proteases are one of the most important digestive enzymes in the midgut of Hyphantria cunea Drury. Proteases are responsible for protein digestion. In the present study, we evaluated the efficiency of some plant inhibitors on proteases in the gut of the H. cunea. Last instar larvae were collected from mulberry trees. The digestive system of the larvae was used as an enzyme source. The total proteolytic and trypsin activity were assessed by the hemoglobin and BApNA, respectively, as the substrate. The evaluation of the total proteolytic and trypsin activities in various pHs showed the highest relative activity at a pH of 11. Also, the inhibitory effect of inhibitors extracted from Alhagi maurorum Medik., Lathyrus sativus L., Vicia faba L., Prosopis farcta (Banks & Sol.) Eig., and Panicum miliaceum L. on the digestive protease of the fall webworm was measured. Protease inhibitors extracted from A. maurorum, P. farcta and P. miliaceum showed negligible inhibition but L. sativus was able to inhibit 34.72% and 100% of the total activity of proteolytic and trypsin, respectively. Also, the total proteolytic and trypsin activities were inhibited by the inhibitor from V. faba, at 22.27% and 100%, respectively. The zymogram pattern of trypsin with nitro-cellulose membranes showed 2 isoforms in the gut of H. cunea. The inhibitor from L. sativus completely inhibited both isoforms. Gel electrophoresis of proteolitytic activity revealed at least 6 isoforms the inhibitor extracted from L. sativus; completely inhibiting some of them. The inhibitor from L. sativus was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and gel-filtration. The molecular mass of the inhibitor was determined as 45 kDa. The highest inhibition of trypsin activity by the inhibitor from L. sativus occurred at a pH of 10. The stability of the inhibitor from L. sativus was evaluated at different pHs and temperatures. The results showed that the inhibitor from L. sativus was stable at a pH of 11.0, and showed 45% inhibition on trypsin activity at a pH of 11. Also, this inhibitor revealed stability up to 50°C.

Open access

Seyede Minoo Sajjadian, Vahid Hosseininaveh and Khalil Talebi Jahromi

Abstract

The Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) is a destructive polyphagous pest of many stored products. To interfere with the physiological processes, especially digestion, of the larval pest, more information on the regulatory mechanisms is needed. The brain extract from 1-day-old last instar larvae of P. interpunctella was examined. In the bioassays, the midguts were treated with the brain extract, and the carbohydrase and protease activities were measured. The brain extract showed increasing dose-dependent effects on α-amylase, α-glucosidase, β-glucosidase, α-galactosidase, β-galactosidase, and trypsin secretion in the larval midgut. The extract was further characterised and partially purified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Several peptides were determined in the brain extract regulating hydrolase activities in the larval midgut of the pest.

Open access

Mahboob Ghamari, Vahid Hosseininaveh, Ali Darvishzadeh and Khalil Talebi

Abstract

Podisus maculiventris (Say) is a generalist predator attacking many insect species from different orders. The bug injects saliva into its prey's body. The ingested hemolymph and liquefied internal tissues pass through the bug's alimentary tract. Collagenase working on peptide bonds of collagen and basement membrane proteins, leads to the disintegration of the prey's internal organs. As yet, there is an almost complete lack of knowledge on the collagenase activity in P. maculiventris. The collagenase activity of the salivary glands and midgut was optimum at pH 8.0 which was congruent with the optimal pH of the total proteolytic activity of the salivary glands. More collagenolytic activity was determined in the posterior lobe of the salivary glands and anterior midgut. Significant inhibition of collagenolytic activity by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) revealed the enzyme is a metalloproteinase. The collagenase activity notably decreased when the bug went hungry. The salivary gland collagenase is a vital enzyme in extra-oral digestion and facilitates the action of other digestive enzymes. The midgut collagenase may be involved in the digestion of the ingested muscle fibers. The collagenase probably acts as an intoxicating agent in the saliva (venom) of P. maculiventris. Paralysing toxins are present in the salivary gland secretion.