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  • Author: V. Baruš x
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Note on morphology of two nematode species Ascaridia hermaphrodita and Ascaridia platyceri (Nematoda): scanning electron microscope study

Abstract

Morphological features of adult specimens of Ascaridia hermaphrodita and A. platyceri (Nematoda: Ascaridida), parasitizing parrots (Psittaciformes), were studied for the first time using scanning electron microscopy. The morphology of A. hermaphrodita, the type species of Ascaridia, coincides fully with the generic diagnosis. The shape of the labial inner structure (two spoon-like projections), cervical alae and spicule with cuticular wings were typical for this species. A. hermaphrodita has been found in the Czech Republic for the first time in a new host, Amazona pretrei, from Brazil. The morphology of Ascaridia platyceri does not correspond with the generic diagnosis in all aspects, as some variation was found, mainly in the presence of interlabia, small teeth in the inner ribbon of the lips and long lateral alae. These morphological characteristics in other species of Ascaridia are discussed. The generic diagnosis is to include the statement “interlabia very rarely present”.

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Oochoristica koubeki n. sp. (Cestoda, Anoplocephalidae) from African Chamaeleo senegalensis (Chamaeleonidae) and emendation of the genus Oochoristica Lühe, 1898

Abstract

During a survey of species diversity and ecology of selected West African vertebrates in the Niokolo Koba National Park, Senegal, two Chamaeleo senegalensis Daudin, 1802 (Chamaeleonidae) were collected and examined for parasites. A new species, Oochoristica koubeki n. sp., anoplocephalidian cestode of the genus Oochoristica Lühe, 1898 is described from the intestine of this host. The new species is related to O. theileri Fuhrmann, 1924; O. theileri Fuhrmann, 1924 f. major Baer, 1933; O. celebensis Yamaguti, 1954 and O. rostellata Zschokke, 1905 var. agamicolla Dollfus, 1957. All the forenamed species share characteristic strobila with proglottids wider than long. Oochoristica koubeki n. sp. differs from these species in different proportions of scolex, cirrus sac, ovarium and vitellarium, further differences are in number of testes and presence of reinforced genital atrium. Only O. theileri shares two last mentioned features, however it differs in shape of testes (rounded) and in distribution of testes (two clusters). The new species differs from all other species in extremely high number of egg’s capsules, different host species and zoogeographic distribution. Emendation of genus diagnosis sensu Beveridge (1994) is provided.

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Nematodes of Cithariniella (Pharyngodonidae) from freshwater fishes in Senegal, with a key to species

Abstract

Three nematode species of Cithariniella (Pharyngodonidae), C. citharini, C. khalili, and C. gonzalesi, were recorded from the recta of squeaker (Mochokidae: Siluriformes) and citharinid (Citharinidae: Characiformes) fishes from Senegal, West Africa. Morphological characteristics obtained by scanning electron microscopy (form of oral aperture and cephalic papillae, presence of lateral alae, distribution and form of cloacal papillae, simple or paired papillae on tail of males, eggs with numerous long filaments on each pole in females) correspond well to the generic diagnosis and represent species differences. The shape and size of the cephalic papillae and lips were identified as a new determination feature. C. gonzalesi is reported for the first time from Senegal and its host, Paradistichodus dimidiatus, represents a new host record. A tentative simple key for differentiating C. citharini, C. khalili, C. gonzalesi and C. petterae is provided based upon these results.

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Two remarkable pinworms (Nematoda: Enterobiinae) parasitizing orangutan (Pongo abelii) in the Sumatra (Indonesia) including Lemuricola (Protenterobius) pongoi n.sp.

Abstract

Two species of pinworms (Enterobiinae) were collected from fresh faeces of semi-wild orangutans Pongo abelii Lesson living in northern Sumatra (Indonesia). The female of Enterobius (Enterobius) buckleyi Sandosham, 1950 is redescribed. Lemuricola (Protenterobius) pongoi n. sp. is described on the basis of females (no males are available) and distinguished from L. (P.) nycticebi (Baylis, 1928) by cephalic and mouth morphology (head and teeth superstructures), body (9.85–15.46 mm) and tail (2.34–2.95 mm) length, smaller eggs (48–56 x 22–28 μm), longer vulva distance from anterior extremity (2.05–3.09 mm) and other features. Characteristic is the total body length/oesophagus length ratio (1: 15.3–22.0). Both nematode species were studied using scanning electron microscopy for the first time.

Open access
A new nematode, Pongobius hugoti gen. et sp. n. from the orangutan Pongo abelii (Primates: Hominidae)

Abstract

Light and scanning electron microscopical examination and molecular analysis of pinworm samples collected from the Sumatran orangutan (Pongo abelii) from Sumatra (Indonesia) revealed the presence of a new taxon, Pongobius hugoti gen. et sp. n. (Oxyuridae: Enterobiinae). The monotypic genus Pongobius is characterised by the presence of a triangular mouth, three rounded teeth and three chisel-like inner teeth in the buccal cavity, an oesophagus with a long pharyngeal part, corpus posteriorly slightly enlarged and continuing as a pyriform bulb, isthmus absent. These features differentiate P. hugoti from all members of the subfamily Enterobiinae. The male has a long caudal appendix (> 50% of total tail length). Molecular analysis of the new taxon is presented for more precise identification.

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Subulura mackoi n. sp. (Nematoda: Subuluridae) and the zoogeography of subulurids parasitizing birds

Abstract

A new nematode species, Subulura mackoi n. sp., is described based on specimens from the colon and caecum of the Eurasian Scops Owl Otus scops (L.) (Aves: Strigiformes) from the Czech Republic, collected in 2011. Males are characterized by 10 pairs of caudal papillae, a single papilla on the upper lip of the cloaca, and small unequal spiculae; female distinguishing features are body length, distance of the vulva from the anterior extremity, tail length, and egg dimension.

Analysis of the zoogeographical distribution and host specialization (in the bird orders) of 68 valid species from the genus Subulura Molin, 1860 shows significantly high species diversity in the tropical zones. Only one species, S. brumpti, is a cosmopolitan parasite of Gallus gallus f. domestica and other domesticated gallinaceous birds. Zoogeographical-host interactions may be utilized to support the identification of morphospecies of the genus Subulura.

Open access