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Tongdi Jamir

Abstract

Air pollution is an important issue around the world. Evidence of air pollution and its impact has been well established by the scientific communities. The effects of these changes on the smaller towns in Brahmaputra valley of Assam still need to be investigated. This study concludes that Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) and Respirable Suspended Particulate Matter (RSPM) shows increasing trend in all the seasons except during the monsoon season but significant during the winter season. The study also reveals that RSPM remained above the standards throughout the decade, unlike SPM, which rose above the standards only during the years 2006, 2008 and 2009. It is also observed that during the rainy seasons Coefficient of Variation (CV) is high in maximum numbers of stations. The study concludes that exponential increase in population; vehicular activities, rainfall and wind direction as well as geographical conditions have indirectly influenced the pollutions.

Open access

Tongdimenba Jamir, Alka Gadgil, Uday De and Gaddam Krishnakumar

Abstract

The study examines whether maximum/minimum temperature is responsible for a warming/cooling trend. In order to accomplish this, linear regression was used in temperature series such as mean (Tmean), maximum (Tmax), minimum (Tmin) and diurnal temperature range (DTR). A detailed analysis indicates that 11 out of 13 stations over the West Coast region (WCR) show a significant increase in annual Tmean as a result of an increase in annual Tmax. However, the Northeast region (NER) shows a mixed trend, with 6 stations displaying significant increases in annual Tmean and 2 showing significant decreases. Both these patterns can be ascribed to a decrease or increase either in Tmin or Tmax. In DTR, 85% of the stations over the WCR show a significant increasing trend, while 60% of stations in the NER display a significant decreasing trend. Analysis of meteorological parameters reveals that low/medium cloud, calm days, winds, forest cover and population growth influence Tmax/Tmin for the NER, whereas low cloud cover and wind direction have an influence over the WCR.

Open access

Jamir Tondgimenba, Uday Shankar De and Gaddam Krishnakumar

Abstract

The projected effect of climate change is the increase of both the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events. An attempt has been made to study the extremes in temperature over two regions of India i.e. North-East Region (NER) and West Coast Region (WCR). A detailed analysis indicated that in the NER, ten stations indicate increase in annual extreme minimum but significant at four stations. Post-monsoon season is very predominant where five stations show significant increase. In the WCR, all the stations indicate increasing trend in annual extreme maximum temperature significant at nine stations. Majority of the stations indicate significant increasing trend in all the seasons except monsoon season.

Open access

Masoud Rafiei, A.S. Gadgil, Hemlata Patil and Tongdi Jamir

Abstract

The increases in air pollution over the metropolitan cities are a threat to human health and environment. An attempt has been made to evaluate the health consequences of indoor air pollution induced by Beam Rolling Mills Factory at Ahwaz (Iran). A questionnaire was prepared to obtain information on health of 481 workers, out of which 200 each were selected from exposed and non-exposed category by stratified randomized method. Fisher exact test and chi-square test were used to calculate the values. The study concludes that more than 80% of the workers have high exposure risk to diseases. Analysis of the health impacts reveals that exposed workers are more prone to various diseases as compared to the non-exposed workers. It is also observed that exposure to air pollutants might be the causative factor for various diseases among the smokers but also nonsmoking workers. The analysis also reveals that there is higher relative risk in occupational fatigue and cardio-vascular disease. Further, the study found that percentage of workers having various diseases is much higher in the indoor environment as compared to the outdoor environment