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  • Author: Tomasz Zawiła-Niedźwiecki x
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Addo Koranteng and Tomasz Zawila-Niedzwiecki

Abstract

Forest losses amid land use dynamics have become issues of outermost concern in the light of climate change phenomenon which has captivated the world’s attention. It is imperative to monitor land use change and to forecast forms of future land use change on a temporal and spatial basis. The main thrust of this study is to assess land use change in the lower half of the Ashanti Region of Ghana within a 40 year period. The analysis of land use change uses a combination method in Remote Sensing (RS) and Geographic Information System (GIS). Cellular Automata and Markov Chain (Cellular Automata-Markov) are utilized to predict for land use land cover (LULC) change for 2020 and 2030. The processes used include: (i) a data pre-processing (geometric corrections, radiometric corrections, subset creation and image enhancement) of epoch Landsat images acquired in 1990, 2000, and Disaster Monitoring Constellation (DMC) 2010; (ii) classification of multispectral imagery (iii) Change detection mapping (iv) using Cellular Automata-Markov to generate land use change in the next 20 years. The results illustrate that in years 2020 to 2030 in the foreseeable future, there will an upsurge in built up areas, while a decline in agricultural land use is envisaged. Agricultural land use would still be the dominant land use type. Forests would be drastically reduced from close to 50% in 1990 to just fewer than 10% in 2030. Land use decision making must be very circumspect, especially in an era where Ghana has opted to take advantage of REDD+. Studies such as this provide vital pieces of information which may be used to monitor, direct and influence land use change to a more beneficial and sustainable manner

Open access

Addo Koranteng, Isaac Adu-Poku and Tomasz Zawila-Niedzwiecki

Abstract

Land-use and land-cover change in both forest reserves and off-reserves is a critical issue in sub Saharan Africa. Deforestation and conversion of forest land to agricultural land continue to be one of the major environmental problems in Africa, and for that matter, Ghana cannot be exceptional; and its resultant effect is the loss in the ecological integrity and the quality of forests, resulting in carbon loss and the resultant climate change effects (FAO 2016). The study area covers the Community Resource Management Areas (CREMA) of the Mole National Park in Ghana, and this study reveals that the area is well endowed with a diverse composition and structure of woodland including dense, open and riverine stretches, which – under the national definition of forest – qualifies as forest. The results reveal that there had been an annual deforestation rate of 0.11% over the period of review. It was concluded from the study that woodland had high carbon stocks with an average carbon of 80 tC/ha, the highest being 194 tC/ha and the lowest being 7 tC/ha, which was recorded in the dense woodland and grassland respectively. The fluxes within the land sector in the study area are moderate and the potential of the area to qualify for as REDD+ is very high. However, the drivers of deforestation, especially bush fires and illegal timber harvesting, are challenges that need to be addressed.

Open access

Addo Koranteng, Isaac Adu-Poku and Tomasz Zawiła-Niedźwiecki

Abstract

Forest plantation is reckoned to accounts for 7% of total global forest cover and has the potential to provide 75% of the global industrial round wood supply. The study analyzed forest resource use trend, mapped out areas of high biodiversity conservation, and made recommendations to promote and sustain large-scale plantation development against the background of anthropogenic pressure on vulnerable ecosystems and biodiversity management.

The methodology adopted for the study involved the application of geographic information system (GIS) and remote sensing techniques, field survey and community interactions. Major findings of the assessment include substantial land use/land cover conversion from one category to another within the past 20 years as a result of agricultural expansion, urbanisation, charcoal production and wood fuel harvesting; dense woodland and riverine forest experienced decline for the 20-year period whilst agriculture open woodland/grassland and settlement were appreciated; floral diversity was high in the dense woodlands with low regeneration potential because of persistent annual wild fires; significant socio-economic and environmental impacts resulting in the conversion of woodlands and removal of riverine vegetation leading to drying out of streams; charcoal production and shifting cultivation leading to decrease in soil productivity and poor crop yields that promotes poverty amongst the inhabitants.

Open access

Aneta Modzelewska, Krzysztof Stereńczak, Monika Mierczyk, Sylwia Maciuk, Radomir Bałazy and Tomasz Zawiła-Niedźwiecki

Abstract

The main goal of this research is to shed further light on the sensitivity of the vegetation indices to spatial changes of stand parameters. The analysis was done within mountain forests in the Sudetes and the Beskids in southern Poland. Some 1327 stands were analysed with more than 70 percent of spruce contribution in the species composition. The response of selected vegetation indices was verified in relation to the alterations of spruce participation, stand height, volume, stand density and diameter. The following indices were analysed: Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, Normalized Difference Red Edge Index, Green Normalized Difference Vegetation Index and Wide Dynamic Range Vegetation Index. Indices were calculated based on the Rapid Eye (Black Bridge) images. All the analysed stand characteristics influence the values of vegetation indices. In general: mean height, diameter at breast height, volume and spruce participation are the most negatively correlated with the indices. Density is a variable that, in general, cannot directly be used for indices correction, because it is hard to find any stable trend. NDRE is the most stable index for the analysis of stand characteristics.