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Jolanta Korycka-Skorupa and Tomasz Nowacki

Abstract

Nowadays a lot of people are trying to make maps, and especially digital maps. A wide range of computer tools and high graphic capabilities have together made maps increasingly popular and seemingly easy to prepare for any person who can use a computer. It seems necessary to verify the bases of the cartographic presentation methods. There is a need for a new, formalized view of the method as a sequence of steps from data collection, to correct presentation, to map. Two terms related to cartographic presentation should be distinguished in this article: “methods” and “forms.” A method is understood as the process by which data is transformed into a presentation. A form is understood as the end result of this process, i.e. the resulting graphical image or map. In the article five types of cartographic presentation are indicated. In the successive types, one can observe an increasing degree of complexity of cartographic presentation.

Open access

Jacek Pasławski, Jolanta Korycka-Skorupa, Tomasz Nowacki and Tomasz Opach

Abstract

The online Atlas kartograficznych metod prezentacji [Atlas of cartographic presentation methods, hereinafter the Atlas] is a research project being carried out at the Department of Cartography of the University of Warsaw. The aim of the project is to systematize knowledge about the use of cartographic presentation methods. This study discusses selected issues related to two of the five presentation methods analysed in the project, viz. the choropleth map and the diagram map. A rational application of two quite commonly-used presentation methods leads to a number of problems. These problems are most easily visible during attempts to program its implementation in the web-based Atlas and are largely due to the difficulties with drawing a clear boundary between what is a good and a bad map. For this reason, the system operator’s skill and eye for the graphics of semi-automated visualisation seem to be of key importance.