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Open access

Alexander Savchenko and Tatiana Borodina

Abstract

Inclusion of specific rural architectural and planning forms in the urban structure of Moscow is analysed. As a theoretical background, theories of Garden-Cities (Howard, 1902), Rural-urban continuum (Sorokin, Zimmerman, 1929), Slow city (Mayer, Knox, 2009) are considered. Inclusion of rural architectural and planning forms is analysed for different structural elements of Moscow’s urban environment – public spaces, industrial areas, residential areas, street and road network. Authors argue that once included into the structure of the city, rural planning and architectural forms do not disappear, but after the termination of the implementation of their parent species and ways of life, which are really related to agriculture and other “non-urban” activities, they are transformed for integration into urban life and the environment, contributing to an increase in their diversity. This pattern can be traced consistently, at least, from the XVIII century.

Open access

Tatiana Borodina and Alexander Savchenko

Abstract

The impact of the transformation of economic activities and sharp weather and climate changes on the quality of life in rural settlements on peatlands in the Moscow region was analyzed. As theoretical background, an analysis of various interpretations of the concept of the quality of life was carried out, including in the context of sustainable development. The impact of economic and environmental factors of the quality of life in rural settlements on peatlands is considered with respect to their location in the zone of attraction of Moscow. It was concluded that the development of industrialization in the region led to population decline and to increase in the anthropogenic load. This critically increased the vulnerability of peatlands to fluctuations in weather and climate conditions and several times led to serious environmental disasters. At the same time, location in the zone of attraction of Moscow opens up opportunities for improving the quality of life associated with the development of post-industrial recreational use.