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  • Author: Tadeusz Szumiata x
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Abstract

In this paper, the results of the complex examination of the 42CrMo4 steel samples are presented. The samples were taken from the metallurgical forging prepared for the production of the wind turbine main shaft. The samples underwent Mössbauer spectroscopic analysis, as well as the measurement of its mechanical characteristics such as hardness and strength are analysed. Conversion electron Mössbauer spectrometry confirmed phase purity and isotropy of the investigated 42CrMo4 steel. The method provided accurate results, proving Mössbauer spectrometry to be an effective tool for the wind turbine main shaft analysis.

Abstract

The investigations of iron-containing phases existing in fly ashes were performed using transmission Mössbauer spectrometry. The examined samples of fly ashes were collected from different coal combustion systems, that is, stoker-fired boiler in municipal heating plant and pulverized coal boiler in power plant. Several phases are identified in the samples: iron oxides, paramagnetic aluminosilicate glass with Fe3+ ions and Al2O4-type spinel with Fe2+ ions. It was pointed out that proportions of contents of phases strongly depend not only on the combustion temperature but also on the way of ash collection.

Abstract

Several samples of dusts from steel and coke plants (collected mostly with electro filters) were subjected to the investigation of content of mineral phases in their particles. Additionally, sample of bog iron ore and metallurgical slurry was studied. Next, the magnetic susceptibility of all the samples was determined, and investigations of iron-containing phases were performed using transmission Mössbauer spectrometry. The values of mass-specific magnetic susceptibility χ varied in a wide range: from 59 to above 7000 × 10−8 m-3·kg−1. The low values are determined for bog iron ore, metallurgical slurry, and coke dusts. The extremely high χ was obtained for metallurgical dusts. The Mössbauer spectra and X-ray diffraction patterns point to the presence of the following phases containing iron: hematite and oxidized magnetite (in coke and metallurgical dusts as well as metallurgical slurry), traces of magnetite fine grains fraction (in metallurgical dusts), amorphous glassy silicates with paramagnetic Fe3+ and Fe2+ ions, traces of pyrrhotite (in coke dusts), α-Fe and nonstoichiometric wüstite (in metallurgical slurry), as well as ferrihydrite nanoparticles (in bog iron ore). For individual samples of metallurgical dusts, the relative contributions of Fe2+/3+ ions in octahedral B sites and Fe2+ ions in tetrahedral A sites in magnetite spinel structure differs considerably.

Abstract

Raman spectroscopy as well as Mössbauer spectroscopy were applied in order to study the phase composition of iron nanowires and its changes, caused by annealing in a neutral atmosphere at several temperatures ranging from 200°C to 800°C. As-prepared nanowires were manufactured via a simple chemical reduction in an external magnetic field. Both experimental techniques proved formation of the surface layer covered by crystalline iron oxides, with phase composition dependent on the annealing temperature (T a). At higher T a, hematite was the dominant phase in the nanowires.