Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author: Sylwia Terpiłowska x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

Sylwia Tobólska, Sylwia Terpiłowska, Jerzy Jaroszewski and Andrzej Krzysztof Siwicki

Abstract

Introduction

Inosine pranobex (Isoprinosine) stimulates cell-mediated immune responses to viral infections in humans and might have also therapeutic use in animals. The aim of this study was to compare three in vitro cytotoxicity assays on mouse embryo fibroblasts and liver cancer cells and determine their ability to detect early cytotoxic effects for inosine pranobex.

Material and Methods

BALB/3T3 clone A31and HepG2 cells were incubated with inosine pranobex at concentrations from 0.1 to 1,000 μg/mL. Cell viability was determined with the MTT reduction, the LHD release, and the NRU tests.

Results

A decrease in the cell viability was observed after incubating the BALB/3T3 clone A31and HepG2 cells with inosine pranobex.

Conclusions

Based on the cytotoxicity endpoints measured in these investigations in BALB/3T3 clone A31cells, it can be concluded that the cell membrane may be the first part of the cell to be affected by inosine pranobex. The disintegration of lysosomes and mitochondria follows mitochondria damage. In HepG2 cells likewise, the cell membrane may be the first part of the cell to be affected by inosine pranobex. Also in liver cancer cells, the disintegration of mitochondria (assessed with the MTT reduction assay) and next of lysosomes (assessed with the NRU assay) follows mitochondria damage.

Open access

Sylwia Tobólska, Sylwia Terpiłowska, Jerzy Jaroszewski and Andrzej Krzysztof Siwicki

Abstract

Introduction

Inosine pranobex (Methisoprinol, ISO, Isoprinosine) is an immuno-modulatory antiviral drug that has been licensed since 1971 in several countries worldwide. In humans, the drug is approved for the treatment of viral infections, and it might also have therapeutic use in animals. The aims of the presented work were to investigate the genotoxicity of inosine pranobex on BALB/3T3 clone A1 and HepG2 cell lines and to elucidate its mutagenicity using the Ames test.

Material and Methods

The BALB/3T3 clone A1 and HepG2 cells were incubated with inosine pranobex at concentrations from 0.1 to 1,000 μg/mL. The genotoxicity was determined by comet and micronucleus assays, and the mutagenicity was determined by Ames assay.

Results

Inosine pranobex did not induce a significant dose-related increase in the number of comets or micronuclei in BALB/3T3 clone A1 and HepG2 cells. Moreover, based on the results of the Ames test, it was concluded that inosine pranobex is not mutagenic in the Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay.

Conclusion

Based on the results of a comet assay, micronucleus assay, and Ames test, it was concluded that inosine pranobex is neither genotoxic nor mutagenic.

Open access

Sylwia Terpiłowska, Dorota Siwicka-Gieroba and Andrzej Krzysztof Siwicki

Abstract

Introduction

Nickel and iron are very commonly occurring metals. Nickel is used in industry, but nowadays it is also used in medical biomaterials. Iron is an element necessary for cell metabolism and is used in diet supplements and biomaterials, whence it may be released along with nickel.

Material and Methods

BALB/3T3 and HepG2 cells were incubated with iron chloride or nickel chloride at concentrations ranging from 100 to 1,400 μM. The following mixtures were used: iron chloride 200 μM plus nickel chloride 1,000 μM, or iron chloride 1,000 μM plus nickel chloride 200 μM. The cell viability was determined with MTT, LHD, and NRU tests.

Results

A decrease in cell viability was observed after incubating the BALB/3T3 and HepG2 cells with iron chloride or nickel chloride. A synergistic effect was observed after iron chloride 1,000 μM plus nickel chloride 200 μM treatment in all assays. Moreover, the same effect was observed in the pair iron chloride 200 μM plus nickel chloride 1,000 μM in the LDH and NRU assays.

Conclusions

Iron (III) and nickel (II) decrease cell viability. Iron chloride at a concentration of 200 μM protects mitochondria from nickel chloride toxicity.

Open access

Sylwia Terpiłowska, Dorota Siwicka-Gieroba and Andrzej Krzysztof Siwicki

Abstract

Introduction

Iron and molybdenum are essential trace elements for cell metabolism. They are involved in maintaining proper functions of enzymes, cell proliferation, and metabolism of DNA.

Material and Methods

BALB/3T3 and HepG2 cells were incubated with iron chloride or molybdenum trioxide at concentrations from 100 to 1,400 μM. The cells were also incubated in mixtures of iron chloride at 200 μM plus molybdenum trioxide at 1,000 μM or iron chloride at 1,000 μM plus molybdenum trioxide at 200 μM. Cell viability was determined with MTT reduction, LHD release, and NRU tests.

Results

A decrease in cell viability was observed after incubating both cell lines with iron chloride or molybdenum trioxide. In cells incubated with mixtures of these trace elements, a decrease in cell viability was observed, assessed by all the used assays.

Conclusion

Iron (III) and molybdenum (III) decrease cell viability in normal and cancer cells. A synergistic effect of the mixture of these elements was observed.