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  • Author: Sylwester Tabor x
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Abstract

Production capacity is the amount of production with the determined assortment structure possible to achieve by a particular production unit in a determined time at the optimal use of production factors and at maintaining the products quality corresponding to standards. The objective of the paper was to determine the production power and output of particular workstations which constitute an assembly line of dry animal feed. The scope of research covered an assembly line in the establishment which produces dry feed for pet animals. Based on information and documentation obtained from the company manager and on the work schedule determined for particular workstations, the operation time of a machine, human work time (operation of a machine) and operation time of the entire station with its working surface was determined. Research showed that workstations which constituted the assembly line of dry animal feed were loaded within 76 to 86%. The lowest loading was reported in the mill and LP02 assembly line and it was respectively 76 and 78%. Whereas loading of the remaining devices was comparable and was at the level within 84 to 86%.

Abstract

A modern model of agriculture is based on three orders - organic, social and economic. An attempt was made in this paper to apply cluster analysis for assessment of economic and organic sustainability of organic farms. Factors that statistically influenced a decision on which farms should be recognised as sustainable were indicated. Analyses allow the following conclusion: 1) in organic farming, animal production including cattle breeding and rearing must be based on a high acreage of permanent grasslands; 2) neither the performed production processes nor the level of their automation rate or the level of organic balance do not decide on the production effectiveness, but factors of the surrounding including social factors.

Abstract

The modern agriculture model is a model based on the principles of sustainable development, i.e. protecting the environment and the cultural landscape on the one hand, and on the other, ensuring adequate income for residents. It is based on three orders: ecological, social and economic. This paper attempts to use cluster analysis to assess the economic and ecological sustainability of organic farms. It also indicates the factors that statistically influenced the assessment of a farm as sustainable, or not. The first part of the work is dedicated to the characteristics of the problem and the methodology of research and analysis. The second part contains the results of the research and discusses them.