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Open access

Susana Costa e Silva and Lucénio Saraiva

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to understand the international perception of Portugal, as well as the strategies used by Portuguese companies to overcome any possible negative country-of-origin (COO) effect. The paper focuses on companies belonging to different Portuguese businesses: wine, footwear and electromechanical. Cases were chosen because of the dynamic process that was correctly put forward at different levels. The results show that Portuguese companies are interested in getting to know how to accommodate or be part of that dynamic process, as this seems to be crucial if they want to succeed in international markets. The perception of Portugal is improving, and there seems to be signs of a positive COO effect being created in some instances. Most of the achievements are due to the previous success of Portuguese businesses and businesspeople in international markets that have been able to create a positive reputation. The key to success seems to be rooted in how companies combine their unique resources with technological innovations and strategic tools, backed by public policy. This study contributes to enhance the knowledge of managers on the COO effect and its effects on companies, by presenting different levels of analysis: company, industry and country level.

Open access

Tuul Purevdorj and Susana Costa e Silva

Abstract

The present study attempts to understand the use of three information processing mechanisms – cognitive, affective, and normative – to assess the quality of cashmere products made in Mongolia. For attaining the above aims, semi-structured interviews were conducted to test a framework that resulted from literature reviewed on country of origin (COO) effect and information processing mechanisms. Results demonstrate that for Business-to-Business (B2B) clients, the COO is an extremely relevant cue to evaluate the quality of cashmere. Conversely, most of the consumers do not seem to include the COO effect on their information processing and base their evaluation on four distinct product-related attributes: quality, brand, social status, and price. Results are relevant for the Mongolian cashmere industry, as well as for marketers interested in understanding what drives consumers of cashmere in their buying decisions. We also understand these findings to assist in improving the image of Mongolia as one of the world’s best manufacturers of cashmere.

Open access

Susana Costa e Silva, Adriana Monteiro and Paulo Duarte

Abstract

Shoes are probably one of the most difficult products to sell online due to the high need-for-touch (NFT) displayed: people need to experiment the product before buying it, more than in any other item. On another hand, women are more prone than men to buy fashion and apparel products through the web channel. This paper investigates the factors driving women consumers to shop footwear products online. A qualitative research method was used grounded on semi-structured, in-depth interviews that were conducted to corroborate the constructs defined in the proposed conceptual model namely: convenience, recreation, NFT and social e-shopping. The interviews were focused on the demand side to understand the female consumers’ perspective and on the top managers of women’s shoes companies representing the suppliers’ viewpoint. The results show that women highly appreciate the convenience that shopping shoes online provides as well as its recreational nature. The NFT also stands out in the shoe market context mainly due to the particularities related to shoe size. Additionally, social e-shopping was found not be as important for women as anticipated as they see social networks more as a communication platform for brands, and less as a factor that influences their predisposition to shop shoes online. On the suppliers’ side, the interviews revealed that managers believe in bloggers and social media influence and its consideration as part of the overall marketing strategy.

Open access

Susana Costa e Silva and Ana Isabel Tavares Vieira

Abstract

Over the past few years, a large number of projects related to entrepreneurship ideas have appeared daily in the media, due to the fact that they were sold as new solutions for companies or gave origin to new companies. These projects were mainly created by individuals who were students, unemployed persons or working people and, consequently, did not have a company of their own and, in most of the cases, also did not have the means to finance their idea. In some situations, the creation of a crowdfunding project presents itself as a convenient and riskless option for funding and this is frequently the reason why some project initiators decide to launch a campaign. The assessment of each campaign depends on the expectations of the project creator, who is in the best position to decide whether it was actually successful. Untangling how a project owner can assess the performance of its project is of major importance, namely when projects are launched by individuals who ultimately carry all the tasks involved in the initiative. This is a field of research within crowdfunding that remains, to the best of our knowledge, under researched. We propose a framework for the analysis of the success of these projects and we test it on six crowdfunding projects launched in Portugal. Our goal is to shed light to the factors that can be used by project creators in the assessment of the performance of their initiatives.