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Stephanie Eckman

Abstract

Housing unit listing is often used in countries that do not have household or person registries to create frames for household surveys. While several studies have reported the kinds of units and areas that are at risk of overcoverage and undercoverage in such frames, none has looked at variability in the listing process. This article explores this variability by comparing two frames created by trained field staff using the same methods and materials. The overall overlap rate between the two listings is 80%. In nearly all blocks, the listers created different frames, and in more than ten percent of the blocks, the two frames did not overlap at all. In this observational study, the overlap between the two frames is particularly low in the blocks listed using the traditional (from scratch) listing method. There is also evidence that sometimes one lister visited the wrong block. The results show that the listing process can introduce variance into survey data.

Open access

Kristen Himelein, Stephanie Eckman and Siobhan Murray

Abstract

Livestock are an important component of rural livelihoods in developing countries, but data about this source of income and wealth are difficult to collect due to the nomadic and seminomadic nature of many pastoralist populations. Most household surveys exclude those without permanent dwellings, leading to undercoverage. In this study, we explore the use of a random geographic cluster sample (RGCS) as an alternative to the household-based sample. In this design, points are randomly selected and all eligible respondents found inside circles drawn around the selected points are interviewed. This approach should eliminate undercoverage of mobile populations. We present results of an RGCS survey with a total sample size of 784 households to measure livestock ownership in the Afar region of Ethiopia in 2012. We explore the RGCS data quality relative to a recent household survey, and discuss the implementation challenges.

Open access

Stephanie Eckman and Edith de Leeuw