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Open access

Somchit Jaruratanasirikul and Wassana Khotchasing

Abstract

Background

The Royal College of Pediatricians of Thailand requires that all its residents complete a full thesis before their final Thai Pediatric Board Examination. The Department of Pediatrics of the Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University (PSU) has been certified for pediatric residency training since 1985.

Objectives

To determine the number of articles published in medical journals that are based on the theses of residents during 25 years of pediatric resident training, and how long after finishing their residency training the articles were published.

Methods

Medical journal databases were searched for the names of former pediatric residents. The faculty staff who had supervised them during their training were asked to confirm whether the residents had published their work.

Results

During the 25 years (1988–2012), we found records of 34 articles based on the theses of 130 residents published in a medical journal (26%). In the early phase (1988–2002), 15 articles from 67 theses (22%) were published: 10 (67%) in Thai or regional English language journals, and 5 (33%) in international peer-reviewed journals. In the second phase (2003–2012), 19 articles from 63 theses (30%) were published: 6 (32%) in regional English language journals, and 13 (68%) in peer-reviewed international journals.

Conclusions

The publication rate of PSU pediatric residency research theses during the 25 years was 26%. We recommend that our faculty devote more time to ensuring supervision of the thesis writing component of the residency training to increase the publication rate of research theses by our residents.

Open access

Somchit Jaruratanasirikul and Wassana Khotchasing

Abstract

Background: The Department of Pediatrics, Prince of Songkla University (PSU) with 7-10 pediatric residents per year has implied a 360-degree evaluating instrument for residency training since 2007.

Objective: We determined the competency ratings of pediatric residents during their training.

Methods: During 2007-2011, 23 pediatric residents finished the pediatric residency program. At each ward rotation, each pediatric resident was rated for competency skills by four different categories of raters: attending staff, nurses, medical students, and the patients’ parents. The average score of each competency given by each category of raters was calculated, and was compared to scores of multiple-choice questions (MCQ) and constructed response questions (CRQ) of Thai Board of Pediatric Examination.

Results: The mean overall scores of each resident rated by the attending staff, nurses, medical students, and patients’ parents increased with year of residency training. The mean overall scores of each resident rated by attending physicians were positively correlated with the MCQ (r = 0.42, p = 0.04) and CRQ (r = 0.71, p < 0.001) scores of the Thai Board of Pediatrics Examination.

Conclusion: The 360-degree assessments with ratings by attending physicians during the pediatric training are reliable for assessment the medical knowledge of the residents.

Open access

Piyawut Kreetapirom and Somchit Jaruratanasirikul

Abstract

Background

Primary hyperparathyroidism is a common disease in adults, but extremely rare in the pediatric age group. To our knowledge, pediatric primary hyperparathyroidism has never been reported in Thailand.

Objectives

To describe 3 cases of primary hyperparathyroidism presenting in Thai children with different clinical manifestations.

Methods

Cases of primary hyperparathyroidism in 3 Thai pediatric patients are reported herein, with a brief literature review.

Results

Three patients are described. The first patient, a 14-year-old Thai girl, presented with progressively worsening bowlegs and lordosis of the spine for 1.5 years. The second patient, a 15-year-old Thai boy, presented with a history of hip pain and constipation for 3 years. The third patient, an obese 11-year-old Thai boy, presented with acute abdominal pain, which was initially incorrectly diagnosed as acute pancreatitis.

Conclusions

The clinical symptoms of hyperparathyroidism in Thai children are nonspecific at an early stage of the disease. The diagnoses are usually delayed and the patients therefore suffer complications of long-term hypercalcemia such as bone deformities or renal nephrocalcinosis. We recommend initial laboratory screening in pediatric patients with nonspecific symptoms and complaints of persistent bone pain. Appropriate investigations to confirm or eliminate primary hyperparathyroidism should be made, as an early diagnosis can facilitate early treatment and prevent the organ damage that can result from delayed diagnosis.