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Open access

Skender Saidi, Sotir Stavridis, Oliver Stankov, Sasho Dohcev and Sasho Panov

Abstract

An increasing tendency has recently emerged for the use of phytotherapeutic agents as alternative to commercial pharmacological agents for the treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of Serenoa repens alcohol extract treatment on BPH patients’ symptoms and major parameters during one-year follow-up.

The study was performed on 70 men aged 40 - 79 years (mean 60.58) with symptomatic BPH that were divided into a group of 40 patients treated with Serenoa repens extract (SRT) and a control group of 30 patients that received no treatment and were observed only. The following parameters were determined at the time of diagnosis (baseline), and after 6 and 12 months: prostate size, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and uroflowmetry parameters including maximum flow rate (MFR), average flow rate (AFR) and post-voiding residual volume (PVRV). In addition, the relevant patient symptoms were evaluated using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) system.

The patients in the SRT group showed a statistically significant increment of the average MFR and AFR values and reduction of PV relative to the control group (p<0.05). The significant differences between the proportion of patients with prostate volume >40 ml in the SRE treated group vs. control group was observed (p<0.05). The mean IPSS score was highly significantly reduced in the SRT group (p<0.01).

The mild improvements of the urine flow, prostate size and IPSS score during 12 months treatment with the Serenoa repens extract indicate possible efficiency of this phytotherapeutic agent in patients with BPH.

Open access

Zivko Popov, Nikola Jankulovski, Oliver Stankov, Sotir Stavridis, Skender Saidi, Marjan Kuzmanoski, Igor Chipurovski, Sasho Banev, Branka Krstevska, Ognen Ivanovski and Chedomir Dimitrovski

Abstract

Introduction: Laparoscopic adrenalectomy has become the preferred approach for removal of the adrenal gland for the management of benign or malignant functioning or nonfunctioning adrenal masses. We aimed to present our initial experience with this procedure. In addition, we compare the clinical outcomes of laparoscopic (LA) vs. the open adrenalectomies (OA) performed at our institutions. Also we report a case of successful laparoscopic treatment of splenic artery aneurism involving laparoscopic splenectomy.

Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis of the data of all patients who underwent adrenalectomy at three institutions, over the last 12-year period, since the laparoscopic adrenal surgery was introduced in our country. All patients were assessed regarding the demographic data, hormonal status, operative time, estimated blood loss, complications, size of the tumor, number of patients requiring blood transfusion, hospital stay and conversion to open surgery for LA.

Results: Thirty five consecutive patients, aged from 33 to 67 (average age 54 years) underwent unilateral LA adrenalectomy during the study period including 14 right and 21 left sided. The laparoscopic procedure was successfully completed in all except 4 cases, which were converted to open surgery to control bleeding from the avulsed adrenal veins. LA proved superior to OA, resulting in less estimated blood loss, shorter operating time, shorter time to resumption of oral intake, shorter postoperative hospital stay and less analgesic requirements. During the follow-up of 3 to 36 months no tumor recurrence and/or metastasis developed.

Conclusions: Our results concur with other retrospective reviews comparing laparoscopic and open adrenalectomy, demonstrating unequivocal advantages in terms of reduced length of hospital stay, blood loss, return of bowel function, functional recovery and post-operative morbidity.

Open access

Irena Rambabova Bushljetik, Jelka Masin Spasovska, Gjulsen Selim, Olivera Stojceva Taneva, Oliver Stankov, Sotir Stavridis, Skender Saidi, Mihail Penev, Saso Dohcev, Trajan Balkanov and Goce Spasovski

Abstract

Introduction. Assessment of renal function is a crucial component of donor evaluation. The higher measured donor GFR is independently associated with a better allograft outcomes in living donor kidney transplantation (LDKT). Monitoring graft function and estimation of GFR is a recommended method for patients’ follow-up in posttransplantation period. The aim of our study was to investigate the correlation of directly measured GFR of donated kidney with estimated GFR through creatininebased formulas and to detect impact factors on the graft function at 12 months posttransplantation. Methods. Fifty LDKT patients (related and nonrelated donors) with stable renal function in a period of 12 months after transplantation were included in our study. The mean recipient age was 30.7±9.6 years, and donor age 55.45±9.41 years. The mean directly measured donated kidney GFR was 47.61±5.72 ml/min. Graft function was estimated at 3, 6 and 12 months by 3 formulas: Cockcroft- Gault (C-G), MDRD 6 variables and Nankivell. Direct correlation of estimated with measured radiolabeled 99mTc DTPA GFR was performed. Various impact factors such as donor age, dialysis vintage and different calcineurin inhibitors as a part of immunosupression were evaluated. Results. Estimated GFR at 12 months with MDRD, Cockroft Gault, and Nankivell formulas was 72.65±22.6, 94.25±36.42, and 81.78±17.89 ml/min, respectively. The highest estimated GFR was obtained with C-G formula at all three time points. The estimated allograft GFR did not correlate with directly measured GFR of donated kidney. Donor age well correlated with the graft function at 12 months. Allografts from standard criteria donors-SCD (<60 years) had better function than allografts form expanded criteria donors-ECD (>60 years). The highest GFR was estimated with C-G equation (106.08±39.26 ml/min), while GFR estimated with Nankivell was 86.86±15.30 ml/min, and with MDRD 79.67±20.28 ml/min, presenting patients in stage 2 of chronic kidney disease. Duration of hemodialysis treatment under 24 months showed better graft function estimated by C-G at 12 months (102.23±38.86 ml/min), compared to that above 24 months of HD (77.84±18.11 ml/ min). Different type of calcineurin inhibitors did not influence on the graft function at any time point. Conclusion. Creatinine-based formulas for estimation of the graft function did not correlate with directly measured function of the donated kidney with radiolabeled isotopes, nor between each other. Hence, the monitoring of the graft function should be done by a single formula in the posttransplantation period. Expectedly, a better graft function was observed in young donors (standard criteria) and in patients with shorter hemodialysis treatment.

Open access

Irena Rambabova Bushljetikj, Gjulsen Selim, Olivera Stojcheva Taneva, Sasho Dohchev, Oliver Stankov, Sotir Stavridis, Skender Saidi, Kocho Dimitrovski, Beti Zafirova Ivanovska, Nikolina Basic Jukic and Goce Spasovski

Abstract

Introduction. Monitoring of graft function by creatinine concentrations in serum and calculated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is recommended after kidney transplantation. KDIGO recommendations on the treatment of transplant patients advocate usage of one of the existing mathematical equations based on serum creatinine. We compared clinical application of three equations based on serum creatinine in monitoring the function of transplanted kidney. Methods. A total number of 55 adult patients who received their first renal allograft from living donors at our transplant center in between 2011-2014 were included into the study. Renal allograft GFR was estimated by the Cockroft-Gault, Nankivell and MDRD formula, and correlated with clinical parameters of donors and recipients. Results. The mean age of recipients was 35.7±9.5 (range 16-58), and the mean age of donors was 55.5±9.0 (34- 77) years. Out of this group of 55 transplant patients, 50(90.91%) were on hemodialysis (HD) prior to transplantation. HD treatment was shorter than 24 months in 37(74%) transplant patients. The calculated GFR with MDRD equation showed the highest mean value at 6 and 12 months (68.46±21.5; 68.39±24.6, respectively) and the lowest at 48 months (42.79±12.9). According to the Cockroft&Gault equation GFR was the highest at 12 months (88.91±24.9) and the lowest at 48 months (66.53±18.1 ml/min). The highest mean level (80.53±17.7) of the calculated GFR with the Nankivell equation was obtained at 12 months and the lowest (67.81±16.7 ml/min) at 48 months. The values of Pearson’s correlation coefficient between the calculated GFR and the MDRD at 2 years after transplantation according to donor’s age of r=-0.3224, correlation between GFR and the Cockfroft & Gault at 6 and 12 months and donor’s age (r=-0.2735 and r=-0.2818), and correlation between GFR and the Nankivell at 2 years and donor’s age of r=-0.2681, suggested a conclusion that calculated GFR was lower in recipients who had an older donors. Conclusion. Our analysis showed difference in the calculated GFR with different equations at the same time points. Using one mathematical equation during the total post-transplantation period would be a recommended method in order to eliminate the discrepancy in determining the stage of kidney failure.