Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author: Sergio Paredes x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

Russel Reiter, Sergio Paredes, Ahmet Korkmaz, Mei-Jie Jou and Dun-Xian Tan

Melatonin combats molecular terrorism at the mitochondrial level

The intracellular environmental is a hostile one. Free radicals and related oxygen and nitrogen-based oxidizing agents persistently pulverize and damage molecules in the vicinity of where they are formed. The mitochondria especially are subjected to frequent and abundant oxidative abuse. The carnage that is left in the wake of these oxygen and nitrogen-related reactants is referred to as oxidative damage or oxidative stress. When mitochondrial electron transport complex inhibitors are used, e.g., rotenone, 1-methyl-1-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine, 3-nitropropionic acid or cyanide, pandemonium breaks loose within mitochondria as electron leakage leads to the generation of massive amounts of free radicals and related toxicants. The resulting oxidative stress initiates a series of events that leads to cellular apoptosis. To alleviate mitochondrial destruction and the associated cellular implosion, the cell has at its disposal a variety of free radical scavengers and antioxidants. Among these are melatonin and its metabolites. While melatonin stimulates several antioxidative enzymes it, as well as its metabolites (cyclic 3-hydroxymelatonin, N1-acetyl-N2-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine and N1-acetyl-5-methoxykynuramine), likewise effectively neutralize free radicals. The resulting cascade of reactions greatly magnifies melatonin's efficacy in reducing oxidative stress and apoptosis even in the presence of mitochondrial electron transport inhibitors. The actions of melatonin at the mitochondrial level are a consequence of melatonin and/or any of its metabolites. Thus, the molecular terrorism meted out by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species is held in check by melatonin and its derivatives.

Open access

Jesús Rivilla-García, Luis Carlos Calvo, Sergio Jiménez-Rubio, Victor Paredes-Hernández, Alejandro Muñoz, Roland van den Tillaar and Archit Navandar

Abstract

The objective of this study was to carry out a detailed quantitative analysis of the very high intensity runs during actual play in the 2013-2014 Spanish First Division, at a general level and according to the specific playing position and half. 380 matches of the Spanish First Division in the 2013 - 2014 season were monitored using the Mediacoach video motion analysis tool. Total distance, very high intensity (above 21 km/h) running distance and the number of runs at very high intensity of 230 players from 20 teams in the Spanish First Division were analysed. The main findings of the study were that the performance indicators at very high intensities decreased from the first half to the second half for all outfield players (covered distance: 4694 ± 538 m vs 4485 ± 437 m, sprint distance: 256 ± 72 m vs 239 ± 67 m, number of sprints: 14.3 ± 3.5 vs 13.2 ± 3.1), except the central defenders (sprint distance: 166 ± 37 vs 166 ± 40 m, number of sprints: 10.0 ± 2.1 vs 9.8 ± 3.8). Secondly, although wide defenders (9759 ± 665 m) and central midfielders (9776 ± 942 m) covered the most distance during matches, it were the wide defenders (30 ± 5), centre-forwards (28 ± 7) and wide midfielders (31 ± 8) who performed the most runs at very high intensity. Consequently, the distance they ran at these very high intensity runs followed the same pattern. Such results enable general and specific profiles by demarcation to be established based on the demands of the game at high-level competitive play.