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Sarah Bro Trasmundi and Matthew Isaac Harvey

Abstract

In this paper we present a micro-analytic description of the role vocalizing plays in a single case of professional dance instruction. We use a novel mix of qualitative and quantitative tools in order to investigate, and more thoroughly characterize, various forms of vocal co-organization. These forms involve a choreographer using vocalization to couple acoustic dynamics to the dynamics of their bodily movements, while demonstrating a dance routine, in order to enable watching dancers to coordinate the intrabodily dynamics of their own simultaneous performances. In addition to this descriptive project, the paper also suggests how such forms of coordination might emerge, by identifying those forms of voice-body coupling as potential instances of “instructional vocal sonification”. We offer a tentative theoretical model of how vocal sonification might operate when it is used in the teaching of movement skills, and in the choreographic teaching of dance in particular. While non-vocal sonification (both physical and computer-generated) is increasingly well-studied as a means of regulating coordinated inter-bodily movement, we know of no previous work that has systematically approached vocal sonification. We attempt to lay groundwork for future research by showing how our model of instructional vocal sonification might plausibly account for some of the effects of vocalization that we observe here. By doing so, the paper both provides a solid basis for hypothesis generation about a novel class of phenomena (i.e., vocal sonification), and contributes to bridging the methodological gap between isolated descriptions and statistical occurrences of a given type of event.

Open access

Sarah Bro Trasmundi and Sune Vork Steffensen

Abstract

This article is an empirically based theoretical contribution to the investigation of meaningmaking in the ecology of human interaction and interactivity. It presents an ecological perspective on meaning-making that pivots on how agents pick up information directly in their organism-environment-system; i.e. as an activity that does not presuppose inner cognitive operations. We pursue this line of thought by presenting an analysis of how a doctor and a nurse make a decision about a specific medical procedure (catheterisation) based on meaning-making activity. As we do not see meaning as a linguistic (symbolic) or a cognitive (representational) phenomenon external to an agent/user, but as emergent in coordinated interaction, we zoom in on how the practitioners recalibrate the organism-environmentsystem by shift ing between a multi-agentive mode and an individual mode. We use Cognitive Event Analysis to investigate how the agents oscillate between being a multi-agent-system with shared, tightly coordinated agency and a loosely coupled dialogical system where the individuals bring forth an understanding based on their professional backgrounds and expertise. On this view, an ecological approach to meaning-making takes a starting point in how local interaction is constrained by previous events, emergent affordances in the environment, and real-time inter-bodily dynamics. Accordingly, meaning-making is seen as a joint activity emerging from the system’s coordinative actions rather than as a result of individual interpretation of symbolic content.