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Vladimír Slobodník and Roman Slobodník

The summary on raptors and owls ringing in Slovakia in 2009

The article provides basic information about the number, species and recoveries of ringed birds of prey and owl species in Slovakia in 2009. The report follows similar papers from the following periods: 2002-2004, 2005-2006 and 2007-2008. In 2009 a total of 1,222 individuals were ringed in Slovakia, of which 856 individuals were birds of prey (18 species) and 366 individuals were owls (8 species). From the total number, 719 birds of prey and 257 owl nestlings were ringed. In comparison with the previous year the number of ringed birds of prey and owls increased by 43%.

Open access

Vladimír Slobodník and Roman Slobodník

Summary on the ringing of raptors and owls in Slovakia in 2010

This paper presents brief information on the number, species and recoveries of ringed birds of prey and owls in Slovakia in 2010. It follows similar papers from 2002-2004, 2005-2006, 2007-2008 and 2009. In 2010 a total of 552 individual birds of prey and owls were ringed in Slovakia, of which 405 were birds of prey (16 species) and 147 owls (9 species). From the total number ringed, 327 birds of prey and 85 owl were nestlings. In comparison with the previous year (2009) the number of ringed birds decreased by 55%.

Open access

Vladimír Slobodník, Roman Slobodník and Miroslav Dravecký

Summary on raptors and owls ringing in Slovakia in 2007 and 2008

This article provides brief information about the number, species and reports about ringed raptors and owls in Slovakia during the period 2007-2008. It is a continuation of similar results of the ringing of raptors and owls in the periods 2002-2004, 2005-2006. In 2007, from 1346 individuals of raptorial birds, 941 raptors and 405 owls of 24 species (16 species of raptors and 8 species of owls) including 805 raptors' and 218 owls' nestlings were ringed. In 2008, a total of 856 individuals were ringed, including 542 raptors and 314 owls of 25 species (15 species of raptors and 10 species of owls) including 421 raptors' and 113 owls' nestlings. Also in 2008, the number of ringed raptors and owls decreased by 36.4% in comparison to 2007.

Open access

Michal Noga, Luboš Vadel and Roman Slobodník

Abstract

The red-footed falcon (Falco vespertinus) migrates throughout the territory of Slovakia regularly, though it rarely breeds here. In the present paper we have reviewed and summarised its observations between the years 1905–2016, focusing on the spring and autumn migration periods and its occurrence outside the breeding season. In total, we have gathered the data on 799 observations of 3,717 individuals. Considering the unsystematic data collection, the data should be taken with caution and may rather serve for information purposes only. However, they provide useful basic items of information regarding the species’ seasonal dynamics in Slovakia and its phenology, and document the evident increase in the number of individuals observed since 2014.

Open access

Vladimír Slobodník and Roman Slobodník

Abstract

The article provides basic information about the number, species and recoveries of ringed birds of prey and owl species in Slovakia in 2011 . The report follows similar papers from the following periods: 2002-2004, 2005-2006, 2007-2008, 2009 and 201 0. In 2011 a total of 61 0 individuals were ringed in Slovakia, of which 509 individuals were birds of prey (1 6 species) and 1 01 individuals were owls (9 species). From the total number, 426 raptor nestlings and 46 owl nestlings were ringed. In comparison with the previous year 201 0 the number of ringed birds of prey and owls increased by 11%.

Open access

Roman Slobodník, Jozef Chavko, Jozef Lengyel, Michal Noga, Boris Maderič and Michal Baláž

Abstract

The population of the red-footed falcon in Slovakia inhabits the north-western edge of the species' breeding range. This breeding population is relatively small and came near to extinction during the population decline of this species in central Europe in recent decades. Thanks to increasing numbers of breeding pairs in Hungary, the Slovak population began to grow again. Moreover, some differences in breeding biology associated with breeding in nest boxes were found. Here we describe the dependence of the small isolated breeding population in Slovakia on the core population in the more eastern parts of the Carpathian Basin, and the impact of supporting activities (nest boxes) on this raptor species in Slovakia.

Open access

Filip Tulis, Imrich Jakab, Roman Slobodník and Michal Hudec

Abstract

During the years 2010-2012, we observed the spatial activity of long-eared owls by the radio telemetry in an agricultural land. The average home range size of tracked long-eared owls for 100 and 95% minimum convex polygon (MCP) was 415.93 and 350 ha, respectively. Between the breeding and the non-breeding season, we did not record significant differences in the size of home ranges. Open land units (meadows and arable lands) belonged to the most abundant land units in the home ranges of tracked owls (mean for 100 and 95% MCP was 24.6 and 24.3%, respectively). Forest edges with their ecotone character also represented the abundant land unit (mean for 100 and 95% MCP was 11.4 and 10.6%, respectively). An amount of built-inhabited areas in home ranges (mean for 100 and 95% MCP was 8.2 and 10.1%, respectively) correlated positively with their size (Spearman rank correlation: for 100% MCP: rs = 0.83, p <0.05; for 95% MCP: rs = 0.91, p <0.05) that indicates long-eared owls to be avoiding built-inhabited areas as an area of the food getting. Two individuals of long-eared owl changed the winter roosts during one non-breeding season, which were at a distance of 650 m from each other.

Open access

Roman Slobodník, Filip Tulis, Jozef Chavko and Jozef Lengyel

Abstract

The rook is a species inhabiting open agricultural landscape whose non-active nests are also used by other bird species for nesting. It is the decline in rook colonies that has been posited as one of the reasons for decrease in the red-footed falcon (Falco vespertinus) population in Slovakia since the 1970s. During the period from 2012 till 2016, four monitorings of rook colonies were carried out in south-western Slovakia (Diakovce, Nitrianska Osada, Sokolce and Tvrdošovce). In the colony at Tvrdošovce, supporting activity involving provisioning of rooks with nest material was under way from 2014 until 2016. While the colonies at Diakovce and Nitrianska Osada have been showing a slight decrease in the number of nesting rooks, despite larger interannual differences the colony at Sokolce has been showing an upward trend. The size of the colony at Tvrdošovce has been stable since the beginning of the supporting activity. This activity had a statistically significant positive effect on the width of rook nests. In 74 cases in the studied rook colonies we have recorded nesting by three other bird species – Eurasian kestrel (Falco tinnunculus) 43.8%, western jackdaw (Corvus monedula) 39.7% and long-eared owl (Asio otus) 16.4%. In 2015 two female redfooted falcons were observed in the colony at Tvrdošovce.

Open access

Filip Tulis, Roman Slobodník, Vladimír Langraf, Michal Noga, Zuzana Krumpálová, Zbyšek Šustek and Anton Krištín

Abstract

The red-footed falcon and Eurasian falcon represent two syntopical falcon species. While the Eurasian falcon is considered a common and numerous species in Slovakia, the red-footed falcon population has undergone a considerable decline during the past few decades. Nowadays it nests in a single locality in Slovakia, the Sysľovské polia Special Protection Area, which forms the northern and fragmented border of the species distribution area in Europe. By analysing prey remains from 9 nests (from 1998, 2001, 2013, 2014 and 2016), we identified 433 prey items belonging to 35 taxa and 9 orders. Every year, invertebrates made up the major part of the diet spectrum, in which Calosoma auropunctatum, Tettigonia viridissima, Zabrus tenebrioides, Anisoplia aegetum and Rhizotrogus sp. were the most frequent species of prey. Of the vertebrates, Microtus arvalis was the most hunted prey species. By supplementary analysis of 21 photos, we extended our knowledge on the diet by other 6 taxa. The peak of the M. arvalis population growth in 2014 did not manifest itself in the red-footed falcon diet composition. In 1998, 2014 and 2016 we also studied the diet of a syntopical species, the Eurasian kestrel. By analysing prey remains in 22 nests, we identified 1,151 prey items belonging to 37 taxa and 7 orders. In 1998 and 2014 vertebrates predominated, especially the common vole, however in 2016 invertebrates prevailed. This fact could be a reaction to the M. arvalis population peak in 2014 and its decline in 2016. These results suggest that this variability in the foraging behaviour of the Eurasian kestrel, an opportunistic predator, during the hunting of invertebrates increases the diet similarity and overlapping of the food niche of both studied falcon species.

Open access

Jozef Chavko, Roman Slobodník, Lucia Deutschová, Ján Lipták, Jozef Mihók, Ján Obuch and Vladimír Nemcek

Abstract

From October 201 0 until December 201 4 the LIFE09 NAT/HU/000384 project was implemented in four Special Protected Areas in Slovakia. The recent project was complementary to a previous LIFE project implemented between 2006 and 201 0. Both projects supported regular monitoring of the population of saker falcon and new approaches to conservation of the species. The LIFE09 project helped to increase knowledge about the prey composition and the behaviour of the species. The population was strongly affected in 201 3 by extremely bad weather conditions (1 .79 fledglings/breeding attempt). Although the total number of saker falcon pairs in Slovakia is thought to be higher, 31 pairs were breeding in 201 4. By analysis of the diet (2991 individuals), 47 prey species were identified, from which birds were predominant (80%). More than half of the diet consisted of feral pigeons (Columba livia f. domestica) (59%)