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  • Author: Renata Pietrzak-Fiećko x
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Renata Pietrzak-Fiećko

Abstract

Introduction: Reports that the presence of persistent organic pollutants in fat may affect fatty acid metabolism prompted this research aiming to study the relationship between the contents of γ-HCH and DDT, DDE, DDD, and ΣDDT, and fatty acid composition of milk fat.

Material and Methods: The material consisted of 50 samples of cow and mare milk, collected in 2015. Ludwicki’s and the Röse-Gottlieb and IDF Standard methods were used to prepare the samples. Statistical analyses were conducted using Statistica 12.0.

Results: There was a negative correlation between the content of γ-HCH and C16:1, C17:1, C18:1c9, C18:1c9c12, and ΣMUFA in cow milk fat and C13:0, C14:0, and C10:1 in mare milk fat. A positive correlation was observed between γ-HCH and C6:0 to C12:0, C14:0, C18:1t16, and ΣSFA in cow milk fat, and between this compound and C14:0iso, C16:1, C17:1, C18:1c9,11, and ΣMUFA in mare milk fat. A negative correlation between the contents of ΣDDT and C16:1, C17:1, C18:1c9,11,13 and ΣMUFA in cow milk fat and C16:0iso, C17:0, and C18:3 in mare milk fat was noted. A positive correlation was found between the contents of ΣDDT and saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids and ΣSFA and ΣPUFA in cow milk fat, and C18:2c9c12 in mare milk fat.

Conclusion: The correlation between the content of selected organochlorine compounds and the composition of fatty acids in cow and mare milk fat indicates the strong influence of these environmental pollutants on the nutritional value of milk fat.

Open access

Renata Pietrzak-Fiećko and Jarosław Parol

Abstract

The aim of the study was to determine the content of chlorinated hydrocarbon residues in fat of different assortment of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The research material consisted of 108 fish from six different producers. Thirty-six fish were analysed as fresh, 36 fish as frozen after six months storage, and 36 fish as traditionally smoked. Chromatographic determination of γ-HCH, DDT, DDD, and DDE was performed with an Agilent Technologies 6890N. The presence of the compounds was detected in all tested fat samples. The content of γ-HCH was five-fold higher in frozen fish (average 2.11 ng/g of fat) than in fresh and smoked fish (0.42 ng/g of fat and 0.43 ng/g of fat, respectively). Total DDT (ΣDDT) content was found higher after refrigerated storage but did not exceed acceptable levels, indicating that the fat in the meat of rainbow trout is an attractive nutritional compound with a low concentration of tested chemical pollutants.

Open access

Renata Pietrzak-Fiećko, Michalina Gałgowska, Sylwia Bakuła and Barbara Felkner-Poźniakowska

Abstract

The aim of the study was to determine and compare the concentrations of chlorinated hydrocarbons residues (DDT, DDE, DDD, γ-HCH) in the milk fat of selected species of farm animals. The experiment was carried out on cow’s, sheep’s, goat’s, and mare’s milk samples originating from different parts of north-eastern Poland. The samples were prepared using Röse-Gottlieb’s and Ludwicki’s methods. The determination of the compounds was conducted with gas chromatography. All tested samples contained the residues of chlorinated hydrocarbons. The results varied depending on the animal species as well as the places of sample collections. The highest content of γ-HCH and ΣDDT was determined in cow’s milk (22.75; 53.12 μg/kg of fat, respectively). The lowest level of γ-HCH and ΣDDT was observed in sheep’s milk (0.25; 5.94 μg/kg of fat, respectively). The content of chlorinated hydrocarbons did not exceed the maximum acceptable levels of these compounds.

Open access

Zdzisław Zakęś, Renata Pietrzak-Fiećko, Mirosław Szczepkowski, Monika Modzelewska-Kapituła and Barbara Jankowska

Abstract

The aim of the study was to determine the impact pike fishing season (before spawning in fall (group A) and after spawning in spring (group B)) had on the slaughter yield and fillet fatty acid profile. The slaughter yield of fillets with skin and skinned fillets from the group B fish was significantly lower (by approximately 7.5% of body weight). The fatty acid profile of the fish meat from the groups examined differed significantly. The fillets of pike caught before spawning were dominated by unsaturated fatty acids (UFA), while those from fish caught after spawning had mainly saturated fatty acids (SFA). The share of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the fillets of fish that had spawned was sixfold lower, and the n-3 PUFA differences were nearly ninefold. The content of eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) fatty acids in fillets of fish that had spawned was ninefold lower than in those that had not yet done so. Consequently, the ratio of n-3 PUFA/n-6 PUFA in pike from group A was over three times higher than that in the fish that had spawned (2.61 vs 0.82). Fillets from pike that have spawned are a significantly poorer source of valuable fatty acids for consumers.