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  • Author: R. V. Salamon x
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Production of selenium-enriched milk and dairy products

Abstract

Until the middle of the last century, selenium was considered to be toxic, but recently it turned out to be a micronutrient with important physiological effects, whose lack impedes the functioning of several enzymes, while in the case of a prolonged deficiency, disease processes can also occur in the body. Hungary belongs to the selenium-deficient regions in Europe; therefore, our aim was to contribute to the improvement of selenium supply of the population through increasing the selenium content of milk and dairy products. A daily supplementation of 1-6 mg organic selenium to the feed of dairy cows increases the selenium content of milk from the value of 18 μg/kg to 94 μg/kg in 8 weeks, decreasing again to the initial value in 6 weeks after stopping the supplementation.

After producing various products from the control milk (18 μg/kg selenium content) and the selenium-enriched milk (53 μg/kg) obtained from dairy cattle fed on a feed supplemented with 2 mg selenium/day, we concluded that the selenium content of selenium-enriched milk compared to the products produced from the control milk increased from the value of 18.6 to 58.5 μg/kg in the case of yogurt, from 66.0 to 138.1 μg/kg in the case of telemea, from 80.8 to 163.7 μg/kg in the case of orda (urdă) and from 88.6 to 200.0 μg/kg in the case of semi-hard cheese obtained by mixed-coagulation. The selenium content of whey also increased significantly (from 8.8-9.7 μg/kg to 20.1-25.8 μg/kg), which could also be used as a food for people or feed for animals. According to our calculations, the selenium requirements of the developing organism could be satisfied by the consumption of 2-3 dl selenium-enriched milk until the age of 8 and with 4-6 dl selenium-enriched milk until the age of 20.

Open access
Production of highly nutritious functional food with the supplementation of wheat flour with lysine

Abstract

During our research, we added 0.5–2.0% L-lysine to wheat flour in order to increase the quantity of this essential amino acid and the biological value of the wheat protein, producing such a functional, health-protecting, and health-preserving foodstuff that is suitable for satisfying the lysine requirement of humans, assuming normal nutrition. Furthermore, by the increase of the biological value completing the wheat flour with a higher amount of lysine, we could produce such a functional, health-protecting and health-preserving food that is suitable for containing or preventing lysine malnutrition symptoms. During our work, we determined the quantity of the Maillard reaction products (hydroxymethyl-furfural) and the lysine content developed during the baking of the wheat flour used for bread baking and in the bread baked with supplemented or without supplemented lysine, and evaluated the sensory characteristics of the produced functional food and the bread supplemented with lysine.

Open access