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  • Author: Prateek Mittal x
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Abstract

In this work, we investigate if statistical privacy can enhance the performance of ORAM mechanisms while providing rigorous privacy guarantees. We propose a formal and rigorous framework for developing ORAM protocols with statistical security viz., a differentially private ORAM (DP-ORAM). We present Root ORAM, a family of DP-ORAMs that provide a tunable, multi-dimensional trade-off between the desired bandwidth overhead, local storage and system security.

We theoretically analyze Root ORAM to quantify both its security and performance. We experimentally demonstrate the benefits of Root ORAM and find that (1) Root ORAM can reduce local storage overhead by about 2× for a reasonable values of privacy budget, significantly enhancing performance in memory limited platforms such as trusted execution environments, and (2) Root ORAM allows tunable trade-offs between bandwidth, storage, and privacy, reducing bandwidth overheads by up to 2×-10× (at the cost of increased storage/statistical privacy), enabling significant reductions in ORAM access latencies for cloud environments. We also analyze the privacy guarantees of DP-ORAMs through the lens of information theoretic metrics of Shannon entropy and Min-entropy []. Finally, Root ORAM is ideally suited for applications which have a similar access pattern, and we showcase its utility via the application of Private Information Retrieval.

Abstract

Recent work has shown that Tor is vulnerable to attacks that manipulate inter-domain routing to compromise user privacy. Proposed solutions such as Counter-RAPTOR [29] attempt to ameliorate this issue by favoring Tor entry relays that have high resilience to these attacks. However, because these defenses bias Tor path selection on the identity of the client, they invariably leak probabilistic information about client identities. In this work, we make the following contributions. First, we identify a novel means to quantify privacy leakage in guard selection algorithms using the metric of Max-Divergence. Max-Divergence ensures that probabilistic privacy loss is within strict bounds while also providing composability over time. Second, we utilize Max-Divergence and multiple notions of entropy to understand privacy loss in the worst-case for Counter-RAPTOR. Our worst-case analysis provides a fresh perspective to the field, as prior work such as Counter-RAPTOR only analyzed average case-privacy loss. Third, we propose modifications to Counter-RAPTOR that incorporate worst-case Max-Divergence in its design. Specifically, we utilize the exponential mechanism (a mechanism for differential privacy) to guarantee a worst-case bound on Max-Divergence/privacy loss. For the quality function used in the exponential mechanism, we show that a Monte-Carlo sampling-based method for stochastic optimization can be used to improve multi-dimensional trade-offs between security, privacy, and performance. Finally, we demonstrate that compared to Counter-RAPTOR, our approach achieves an 83% decrease in Max-Divergence after one guard selection and a 245% increase in worst-case Shannon entropy after 5 guard selections. Notably, experimental evaluations using the Shadow emulator shows that our approach provides these privacy benefits with minimal impact on system performance.

Abstract

A key challenge facing the design of differential privacy in the non-interactive setting is to maintain the utility of the released data. To overcome this challenge, we utilize the Diaconis-Freedman-Meckes (DFM) effect, which states that most projections of high-dimensional data are nearly Gaussian. Hence, we propose the RON-Gauss model that leverages the novel combination of dimensionality reduction via random orthonormal (RON) projection and the Gaussian generative model for synthesizing differentially-private data. We analyze how RON-Gauss benefits from the DFM effect, and present multiple algorithms for a range of machine learning applications, including both unsupervised and supervised learning. Furthermore, we rigorously prove that (a) our algorithms satisfy the strong ɛ-differential privacy guarantee, and (b) RON projection can lower the level of perturbation required for differential privacy. Finally, we illustrate the effectiveness of RON-Gauss under three common machine learning applications – clustering, classification, and regression – on three large real-world datasets. Our empirical results show that (a) RON-Gauss outperforms previous approaches by up to an order of magnitude, and (b) loss in utility compared to the non-private real data is small. Thus, RON-Gauss can serve as a key enabler for real-world deployment of privacy-preserving data release.

Abstract

Over the last decade, differential privacy (DP) has emerged as the gold standard of a rigorous and provable privacy framework. However, there are very few practical guidelines on how to apply differential privacy in practice, and a key challenge is how to set an appropriate value for the privacy parameter ɛ. In this work, we employ a statistical tool called hypothesis testing for discovering useful and interpretable guidelines for the state-of-the-art privacy-preserving frameworks. We formalize and implement hypothesis testing in terms of an adversary’s capability to infer mutually exclusive sensitive information about the input data (such as whether an individual has participated or not) from the output of the privacy-preserving mechanism. We quantify the success of the hypothesis testing using the precision- recall-relation, which provides an interpretable and natural guideline for practitioners and researchers on selecting ɛ. Our key results include a quantitative analysis of how hypothesis testing can guide the choice of the privacy parameter ɛ in an interpretable manner for a differentially private mechanism and its variants. Importantly, our findings show that an adversary’s auxiliary information - in the form of prior distribution of the database and correlation across records and time - indeed influences the proper choice of ɛ. Finally, we also show how the perspective of hypothesis testing can provide useful insights on the relationships among a broad range of privacy frameworks including differential privacy, Pufferfish privacy, Blowfish privacy, dependent differential privacy, inferential privacy, membership privacy and mutual-information based differential privacy.

Abstract

The popularity of Tor has made it an attractive target for a variety of deanonymization and fingerprinting attacks. Location-based path selection algorithms have been proposed as a countermeasure to defend against such attacks. However, adversaries can exploit the location-awareness of these algorithms by strategically placing relays in locations that increase their chances of being selected as a client’s guard. Being chosen as a guard facilitates website fingerprinting and traffic correlation attacks over extended time periods. In this work, we rigorously define and analyze the guard placement attack. We present novel guard placement attacks and show that three state-of-the-art path selection algorithms—Counter-RAPTOR, DeNASA, and LASTor—are vulnerable to these attacks, overcoming defenses considered by all three systems. For instance, in one attack, we show that an adversary contributing only 0.216% of Tor’s total bandwidth can attain an average selection probability of 18.22%, 84× higher than what it would be under Tor currently. Our findings indicate that existing location-based path selection algorithms allow guards to achieve disproportionately high selection probabilities relative to the cost required to run the guard. Finally, we propose and evaluate a generic defense mechanism that provably defends any path selection algorithm against guard placement attacks. We run our defense mechanism on each of the three path selection algorithms, and find that our mechanism significantly enhances the security of these algorithms against guard placement attacks with only minimal impact to the goals or performance of the original algorithms.

Abstract

An important line of privacy research is investigating the design of systems for secure input and output (I/O) within Internet browsers. These systems would allow for users’ information to be encrypted and decrypted by the browser, and the specific web applications will only have access to the users’ information in encrypted form. The state-of-the-art approach for a secure I/O system within Internet browsers is a system called ShadowCrypt created by UC Berkeley researchers []. This paper will explore the limitations of ShadowCrypt in order to provide a foundation for the general principles that must be followed when designing a secure I/O system within Internet browsers. First, we developed a comprehensive UI attack that cannot be mitigated with popular UI defenses, and tested the efficacy of the attack through a user study administered on Amazon Mechanical Turk. Only 1 of the 59 participants who were under attack successfully noticed the UI attack, which validates the stealthiness of the attack. Second, we present multiple attack vectors against Shadow-Crypt that do not rely upon UI deception. These attack vectors expose the privacy weaknesses of Shadow DOM—the key browser primitive leveraged by ShadowCrypt. Finally, we present a sketch of potential countermeasures that can enable the design of future secure I/O systems within Internet browsers.

Abstract

Many recent proposals for anonymous communication omit from their security analyses a consideration of the effects of time on important system components. In practice, many components of anonymity systems, such as the client location and network structure, exhibit changes and patterns over time. In this paper, we focus on the effect of such temporal dynamics on the security of anonymity networks. We present Tempest, a suite of novel attacks based on (1) client mobility, (2) usage patterns, and (3) changes in the underlying network routing. Using experimental analysis on real-world datasets, we demonstrate that these temporal attacks degrade user privacy across a wide range of anonymity networks, including deployed systems such as Tor; pathselection protocols for Tor such as DeNASA, TAPS, and Counter-RAPTOR; and network-layer anonymity protocols for Internet routing such as Dovetail and HORNET. The degradation is in some cases surprisingly severe. For example, a single host failure or network route change could quickly and with high certainty identify the client’s ISP to a malicious host or ISP. The adversary behind each attack is relatively weak – generally passive and in control of one network location or a small number of hosts. Our findings suggest that designers of anonymity systems should rigorously consider the impact of temporal dynamics when analyzing anonymity.