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  • Author: Plamen Zorovski x
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Cellulose Accumulation in Straw of Triticum Monococcum L., Triticum Dicoccum Sch. and Triticum Spelta L. in Organic Farming Conditions

Summary

In a study conducted in the experimental field of the Agricultural University - Plovdiv accumulation of cellulose in straw of Triticum monococcum L., Triticum dicoccum Sch. and Triticum spelta L., has been tracked as a result of bio fertilizes application in organic farming conditions. The highest cellulose content was found in the straw of Triticum spelta L., followed by Triticum monococcum L. The least accumulation was found in the straw of Triticum dicoccum Sch. With few exceptions, the application of the investigated fertilizes, increases the content of cellulose in a leaf-stalked mass in Triticum dicoccum Sch. and Triticum spelta L. The opposite trend was observed in Triticum dicoccum Sch. A species reaction was found as a result of fertilization on accumulation of cellulose in straw.

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Growth and Development of Triticum Monococcum L., Triticum Dicoccum Sch. and Triticum Spelta L. in Organic Farming Conditions

Summary

During the 2014-2016 period in Agroecological Center at the Agricultural University - Plovdiv, Bulgaria growth and development of three species of wheat in terms of organic farming had been tracked in order to return the species in the crop rotation, maintenance of biodiversity and receiving of cleaner and healthy products from organic farms. The three species of wheat Triticum monococcum L., Triticum dicoccum Sch, and Triticum spelta L., differ between its rate of growth, development, general and productive tillering. In tillering phase the plants reached 12,3 cm of height for Triticum monococcum L., 15,7 cm for Triticum spelta L. and 19,4 cm for Triticum dicoccum Sch. Triticum monococcum L. and Triticum dicoccum Sch, reached ear formation phase 5 days earlier than Triticum spelta L. The interfacial period of stem elongation - ear formation in them, was about 21 days compared to 25 days for Triticum spelta L.. From ear formation to full maturity inter-phase periods were shorter in Triticum dicoccum Sch., which specifies the species as an early mature (6 days earlier) compared to the other two. After phenophase of stem elongation plants were growing the most intensive and in full ripeness reached a height of 94 cm in Triticum monococcum L., 81,5 cm in Triticum dicoccum Sch. and 82,5 cm in Triticum spelta L.

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Allelopathic Effect of Dodder on Different Varieties of Lucerne and Bird’s Foot-Trefoil

Summary

The aim of this study was to evaluate the allelopathic effect of cold aqueous extracts, both fresh and dry biomass of dodder (Cuscuta epithymum L.) on lucerne (Medicago sativa L.) and bird’s foot-trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.). Four different varieties of lucerne “Pleven 6”, “Dara”, “Roly”, “Multifoliolate”) and bird’s foot-trefoil (“Gran San Gabriele”, “Leo”, “Local population 1”, “Local population 2”) were studied in order to find some varieties with allelopathic tolerance. Ex-situ experiment was carried out as follows: 100 seeds of each variety were put in Petri dishes between filter paper, both cold extracts of parasitic weed biomass were pipetted at a ratio of 1:20 as against the seed mass and then were placed in a thermostat-operated device at a temperature of 22 ± 2°С. Distilled water was used as a control. Percentage inhibition, Index of tolerance and Index of plant development were calculated for assessment of the allelopathic effect of dodder on the early seedling growth, biomass synthesis and initial development of experimental varieties. As a whole, dry weed biomass was found as more toxic for the tested plants than the fresh one. Medicago sativa var. multifoliolate and Lotus corniculatus var. Local population 1 and Local population 2 showed a significant tolerance to the allelopathic influence of Cuscuta epithymum in all studied concentrations of aqueous extract of fresh weed biomass (25, 50 and 100 g l−1) and medium tolerance to aqueous extract of dry weed biomass (concentrations of 25 and 50 g l−1).

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