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Open access

Cui-Zhen Fan, Yu-Ping Chu, Ping Wei, Hong Dai and Wenming Chen

Comparison of survival of patients receiving laparoscopic and open radical resection for stage II colon cancer

Background. The aim of the study was to compare the survival of patients receiving laparoscopic vs. open radical resection for stage II colon cancer.

Patients and methods. Two hundred and twenty patients with stage II colon cancer were enrolled from Beijing Chaoyang Hospital of Capital Medical University from January 2000 to December 2009, including 61 patients in the laparoscopic radical resection group and 159 patients in the open radical resection group. The survival data in both groups were compared using the log rank test based on Kaplan-Meier survival curves.

Results. There was no statistically significant difference in the 3-year survival (88.5% vs. 80.5%; X2=1.98, P=0.159) and the 5-year survival (81.9% vs. 69.2%; X2=1.98, P=0.159) between both groups. However, statistically significant difference was found in median overall survival (mOS), which was 102.6 (95% CI: 76.8-122.7) months in the laparoscopic group and 90.0 (95% CI: 70.4-109.6) months in the open radical resection group (X2=4.183, P=0.041). mOS was 96 (95% CI: 68.6-111.4) months and 92.6 (95% CI: 56.8-107.2) months in those with and without postoperative chemotherapy, respectively (X2=6.389, P=0.011). For patients older than 75 years the mOS was 90.0 (95% CI: 25.3-105.0) months and 83.4 (95% CI: 13.1-96.9) months in the laparoscopic and open group, respectively. The difference between the both groups was statistically significant (X2=6.191, P=0.013).

Conclusions. The mOS of patients receiving laparoscopic radical resection was better than open radical resection for stage II colon cancer, especially for patients over 75 years old.

Open access

Shuaishuai Huang, Pinger Cui, Shuangxia Lin, Xuping Yao, Xue Wang, Yu Ren and Guobin Weng

Abstract

Our previous reports showed that the cyclic-AMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) served as a proto-oncogene in the process of tumorigenesis and mediated the growth and metastatic activity of renal cancer cells. Our study, therefore, explored the role of CREB in sorafenib- -inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Renal cancer cells were cultured in medium containing sorafenib for 12, 24, 48 and 72 h. The MTT assay was used to study the cytotoxic effects of sorafenib. Cell invasion and migration were assayed in wound healing and transwell experiments, respectively. Protein expression levels were evaluated by western blotting. The results show that sorafenib treatment decreased cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Sorafenib inhibited cell migration and invasion and decreased the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Moreover, addition of the recombinant plasmid pCI-neo/ CREB (PN) reversed the sorafenib-induced inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion. These results show that CREB is associated with the sorafenib-induced inhibition of proliferation, migration and invasion.

Open access

Wei Li, Cai-Hong Shi, Yi-Ling Sheng, Ping Cui, Yu-Qing Zhao and Xiang-Rong Zhang

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo performance of salbutamol sulfate press-coated tablets for delayed release. The in vitro release behavior of press-coated tablets with the outer layer of PEG 6000/ Eudragit S100 blends (2:1) in pH 1.2 (0.1 mol L-1 HCl) and then pH 6.8 buffer solution was examined. Morphological change of the press-coated tablet during in vitro release was recorded with a digital camera. Release of salbutamol sulfate from press-coated tablets was less than 5 % before 3 h and was completed after 8 h in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer solution. In vivo gamma scintigraphy study carried out on healthy men indicated that the designed system released the drug in lower parts of the GI tract after a lag time of 5 hours. The results showed the capability of the system of achieving delayed release of the drug in both in vitro and in vivo gamma scintigraphy studies.

Open access

Tao Lan, Bao-chun Chen, Li-ping Fu, Zhi-juan Li, Xiang-jun Wu and Nai-qiang Cui

Abstract

Intestinal barrier dysfunction, facilitating translocation of bacteria and bacterial products, plays an important role in the pathophysiology of liver cirrhosis and its complications. Intestinal defense system including microbial barrier, immunologic barrier, mechanical barrier, chemical barrier, plays an important role in the maintenance of intestinal function. Under normal circumstances, the intestinal barrier can prevent intestinal bacteria through the intestinal wall from spreading to the body. Severe infection, trauma, shock, cirrhosis, malnutrition, immune suppression conditions, intestinal bacteria and endotoxin translocation, can lead to multiple organ dysfunction. The intestinal microflora is not only involved in the digestion of nutrients, but also in local immunity, forming a barrier against pathogenic microorganisms. The derangement of the gut microflora may lead to microbial translocation, defined as the passage of viable microorganisms or bacterial products from the intestinal lumen to the mesenteric lymph nodes and other extraintestinal sites. In patients with cirrhosis, primary and intestinal flora imbalance, intestinal bacterial overgrowth, intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction, endotoxemia is associated with weakened immunity.